Australian New Crops Info 2016
Supported by the Rural Industries Research and Development Corporation

Listing of Interesting Plants of the World:

Kalmia microphylla

 

 

This species is usually known as:

Kalmia microphylla, Kalmia microphylla subsp. occidentalis

 

This species has also been known as:

Kalmia microphylla var. occidentalis

 

Common names:

Alpine Laurel, Bog Laurel, Swamp-Laurel, Western Bog-Laurel, Western Laurel

 

 

Trends (five databases) 1901-2013:
[Number of papers mentioning Kalmia microphylla: 15]

 

 

Popularity of Kalmia microphylla over time
[Left-hand Plot: Plot of numbers of papers mentioning Kalmia microphylla (histogram and left hand axis scale of left-hand plot) and line of best fit, 1901 to 2013 (equation and % variation accounted for in box); Right-hand Plot: Plot of a proportional micro index, derived from numbers of papers mentioning Kalmia microphylla as a proportion (scaled by multiplying by one million) of the approximate total number of papers available in databases for that year (frequency polygon and left-hand axis scale of right-hand plot) and line of best fit, 1901 to 2013 (equation and % variation accounted for in box)] 

[For larger charts showing the numbers of papers that have mentioned this species over years, select this link; there are links to come back from there]

 

Keywords

[Total number of keywords included in the papers that mentioned this species: 50]

 

traditional medicines (British Columbia) (3), Ethnopharmacology (British Columbia) (2), [delta]15N (1), activated charcoal clinical efficacy and Rhododendron ingestion (1), Alnus rubra (1), Amelanchier alnifolia (1), antibiotic activity (1), Antifungal activity (1), Antiviral activity (1), Artemisia ludoviciana (1), Artemisia tridentata (1), British Columbia (1), Cardamine angulata (1), Conocephalum conicum (1), Dark septate endophytes (1), density compensation (1), deuteromycetes (1), ecology (1), fungi (1), Geum macrophyllum (1), gradient (1), grayanotoxin detection and thin-layer chromatography GS/MS (1), Ipomopsis aggregata (1), leaf (1), Lomatium dissectum (1), Lysichiton americanum (1), Mahonia aquifolium (1), Moneses uniflora (1), mycorrhizas (1), Nitrogen source (1), Oplopanax horridus (1), peat bog (1), Peatland (1), plant (1), plasticity (1), Polypodium glycyrrhiza (1), Potentilla arguta (1), Pseudomonas aeruginosa (1), rhododendrons and grayanotoxins (1), root endophytes (1), Rosa nutkana (1), Sambucus racemosa (1), specific leaf area (1), Sphagnum (1), Stable isotope (1), Staphytococcus aureus (1), Verbascum thapsus (1)

 

[If all keywords are not here (as indicated by .....), they can be accessed from this link; there are links to come back from there]

 

 

Most likely scope for crop use/product (%):
[Please note: When there are only a few papers mentioning a species, care should be taken with the interpretation of these crop use/product results; as well, a mention may relate to the use of a species, or the context in which it grows, rather than a product]

 

turf (65.41), oilseed/fat (13.56), medicinal (7.31), poison (1.48), fruit (1.45), weed (1.10), ornamental (0.92), starch (0.66), timber (0.64), cereal (0.46)…..

 

[To see the full list of crop use/product outcomes, from searching abstracts of the papers that have mentioned this species, select this link; details of the analysis process have also been included; there are links to come back from there]

 

 

Recent mentions of this species in the literature:
[since 2012, with links to abstracts; The references from 1901-2013 which have been used for the trend, keyword and crop use/product analyses below, are listed below these references]

 

Lacourse T and Davies MA (2015) A multi-proxy peat study of Holocene vegetation history, bog development, and carbon accumulation on northern Vancouver Island, Pacific coast of Canada. The Holocene 25, 1165-1178. http://hol.sagepub.com/cgi/content/abstract/25/7/1165

Huntley MJ, Mathewes RW and Shotyk W (2013) High-resolution palynology, climate change and human impact on a late Holocene peat bog on Haida Gwaii, British Columbia, Canada. The Holocene 23, 1572-1583. http://hol.sagepub.com/cgi/content/abstract/23/11/1572

Burrows GE and Tyrl RJ (2012) Ericaceae Juss. In Toxic Plants of North America (Ed.^(Eds  pp. 434-449. (Wiley-Blackwell). http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/9781118413425.ch33

Wiese JL, Meadow JF and Lapp JA (2012) Seed weights for northern Rocky Mountain native plants: With an Emphasis on Glacier National Park. NPJ 13, 39-50. http://npj.uwpress.org/cgi/content/abstract/13/1/39

 

 

References 1901-2013 (and links to abstracts):
[Number of papers mentioning Kalmia microphylla: 15; Any undated papers have been included at the end]

 

Wiese JL, Meadow JF and Lapp JA (2012) Seed weights for northern Rocky Mountain native plants: With an Emphasis on Glacier National Park. NPJ 13, 39-50.  http://npj.uwpress.org/cgi/content/abstract/13/1/39

Barceloux DG (2008) Rhododendrons and Grayanotoxins. In ‘Medical Toxicology of Natural Substances’ (Ed.^(Eds  pp. 870-873. (John Wiley & Sons, Inc.). http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/9780470330319.ch152

Asada T, Warner BG and Aravena R (2005) Nitrogen isotope signature variability in plant species from open peatland. Aquatic Botany 82, 297-307.  http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0304377005001105

(2004) Mountain Laurel. In ‘Sax’s Dangerous Properties of Industrial Materials’ (Ed.^(Eds  pp. (John Wiley & Sons, Inc.). http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/0471701343.sdp18120

Burns KC (2004) Patterns in specific leaf area and the structure of a temperate heath community. Diversity and Distributions 10, 105-112.  http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1366-9516.2004.00058.x

Turunen C and Turunen J (2003) Development history and carbon accumulation of a slope bog in oceanic British Columbia, Canada. The Holocene 13, 225-238.  http://hol.sagepub.com/cgi/content/abstract/13/2/225

Harris SA (2001) Twenty Years of Data on Climate–Permafrost–Active Layer Variations at the Lower Limit of Alpine Permafrost, Marmot Basin, Jasper National Park, Canada. Geografiska Annaler: Series A, Physical Geography 83, 1-13.  http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.0435-3676.2001.00140.x

Slaton MR, Raymond Hunt E, Jr. and Smith WK (2001) Estimating near-infrared leaf reflectance from leaf structural characteristics. Am. J. Botany 88, 278-284.  http://www.amjbot.org/cgi/content/abstract/88/2/278

Jumpponen ARI and Trappe JM (1998) Dark septate endophytes: a review of facultative biotrophic root-colonizing fungi. New Phytologist 140, 295-310.  http://dx.doi.org/10.1046/j.1469-8137.1998.00265.x

McCutcheon AR, Roberts TE, Gibbons E, Ellis SM, Babiuk LA, Hancock REW and Towers GHN (1995) Antiviral screening of British Columbian medicinal plants. Journal of Ethnopharmacology 49, 101-110.  http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/0378874195900373

McCutcheon AR, Ellis SM, Hancock REW and Towers GHN (1994) Antifungal screening of medicinal plants of British Columbian native peoples. Journal of Ethnopharmacology 44, 157-169.  http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/0378874194011834

McCutcheon AR, Ellis SM, Hancock REW and Towers GHN (1992) Antibiotic screening of medicinal plants of the British Columbian native peoples. Journal of Ethnopharmacology 37, 213-223.  http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/037887419290036Q

Styan WB and Bustin RM (1983) Petrographyof some fraser river delta peat deposits: Coal maceral and microlithotype precursors in temperate-climate peats. International Journal of Coal Geology 2, 321-370.  http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/0166516283900162

Kingsbury JM (1958) Plants Poisonous to Livestock. A Review. Journal of Dairy Science 41, 875-907.  http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0022030258910208

Evans C (1938) A phytochemical study of kalmia polifolia, ericaceć. Journal of the American Pharmaceutical Association 27, 681-689.  http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/jps.3080270813

 


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Grateful acknowledgment is made to the following: for plant names: Australian Plant Name Index, Australian National Herbarium http://www.anbg.gov.au/cpbr/databases/apni-search-full.html; ; The International Plant Names Index, Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew/Harvard University Herbaria/Australian National Herbarium http://www.ipni.org/index.html; Plants Database, United States Department of Agriculture, National Resources Conservation Service http://plants.usda.gov/;DJ Mabberley (1997) The Plant Book, Cambridge University Press (Second Edition); JH Wiersma and B Leon (1999) World Economic Plants, CRC Press; RJ Hnatiuk (1990) Census of Australian Vascular Plants, Australian Government Publishing Service; for information: Science Direct http://www.sciencedirect.com/; Wiley Online Library http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/advanced/search; High Wire http://highwire.stanford.edu/cgi/search; Oxford Journals http://services.oxfordjournals.org/search.dtl; USDA National Agricultural Library http://agricola.nal.usda.gov/booleancube/booleancube_search_cit.html; for synonyms: The Plant List http://www.theplantlist.org/; for common names: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page; etc.


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Latest update March 2017 by: ANCW