Australian New Crops Info 2016
Supported by the Rural Industries Research and Development Corporation

Listing of Interesting Plants of the World:

Kalmiopsis leachiana

 

 

This species is usually known as:

Kalmiopsis leachiana

 

This species has no synonyms in The Plant List

 

Common names:

North Umpqua Kalmiopsis, Kalmiopsis

 

 

Trends (five databases) 1901-2013:
[Number of papers mentioning Kalmiopsis leachiana: 10]

 

 

Popularity of Kalmiopsis leachiana over time
[Left-hand Plot: Plot of numbers of papers mentioning Kalmiopsis leachiana (histogram and left hand axis scale of left-hand plot) and line of best fit, 1901 to 2013 (equation and % variation accounted for in box); Right-hand Plot: Plot of a proportional micro index, derived from numbers of papers mentioning Kalmiopsis leachiana as a proportion (scaled by multiplying by one million) of the approximate total number of papers available in databases for that year (frequency polygon and left-hand axis scale of right-hand plot) and line of best fit, 1901 to 2013 (equation and % variation accounted for in box)] 

[For larger charts showing the numbers of papers that have mentioned this species over years, select this link; there are links to come back from there]

 

Keywords

[Total number of keywords included in the papers that mentioned this species: 28]

 

Bejarieae (2), Bryantheae (2), Classification (2), Empetreae (2), Ericeae (2), Ericoideae (2), Molecular phylogeny (2), Phyllodoceae (2), Rhodoreae (2), Amaryllidaceae (1), correlation with secretory structures. (1), disassortative mating (1), distribution (1), Flavonoids (1), free aglycones (1), heterostyly (1), morph ratios (1), population size (1), stigma-height dimorphism (1)

 

[If all keywords are not here (as indicated by .....), they can be accessed from this link; there are links to come back from there]

 

 

Most likely scope for crop use/product (%):
[Please note: When there are only a few papers mentioning a species, care should be taken with the interpretation of these crop use/product results; as well, a mention may relate to the use of a species, or the context in which it grows, rather than a product]

 

fruit (88.83), medicinal (1.50), poison (1.09), weed (0.83), ornamental (0.70), starch (0.50), timber (0.48), cereal (0.35), nutraceutical (0.35), grain legume (0.34)…..

 

[To see the full list of crop use/product outcomes, from searching abstracts of the papers that have mentioned this species, select this link; details of the analysis process have also been included; there are links to come back from there]

 

 

Recent mentions of this species in the literature:
[since 2012, with links to abstracts; The references from 1901-2013 which have been used for the trend, keyword and crop use/product analyses below, are listed below these references]

 

Ikeda H, Yakubov V, Barkalov V and Setoguchi H (2014) Molecular evidence for ancient relicts of arctic-alpine plants in East Asia. New Phytologist 203, 980-988. http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/nph.12863

Luna T (2014) Conserving US temperate forest plant diversity: a case example with forest-floor Aristolochiaceae. NPJ 15, 236-246. http://npj.uwpress.org/cgi/content/abstract/15/3/236

 

 

References 1901-2013 (and links to abstracts):
[Number of papers mentioning Kalmiopsis leachiana: 10; Any undated papers have been included at the end]

 

Popp M, Mirre V and Brochmann C (2011) A single Mid-Pleistocene long-distance dispersal by a bird can explain the extreme bipolar disjunction in crowberries (Empetrum). PNAS 108, 6520-6525.  http://www.pnas.org/cgi/content/abstract/108/16/6520

Barrett SCH (2010) Darwin’s legacy: the forms, function and sexual diversity of flowers. Phil Trans R Soc B 365, 351-368.  http://rstb.royalsocietypublishing.org/cgi/content/abstract/365/1539/351

Gillespie E and Kron K (2010) Molecular phylogenetic relationships and a revised classification of the subfamily Ericoideae (Ericaceae). Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution 56, 343-354.  http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1055790310000965

Li A-M, Wu X-Q, Zhang D-X and Barrett SCH (2010) Cryptic dioecy in Mussaenda pubescens (Rubiaceae): a species with stigma-height dimorphism. Ann. Bot. 106, 521-531.  http://aob.oxfordjournals.org/cgi/content/abstract/106/4/521

Baker AM, Thompson JD and Barrett SCH (2000) Evolution and maintenance of stigma-height dimorphism in Narcissus. I. Floral variation and style-morph ratios. Heredity 84, 502-513.  http://dx.doi.org/10.1046/j.1365-2540.2000.00651.x

Barrett SCH, Jesson LK and Baker AM (2000) The Evolution and Function of Stylar Polymorphisms in Flowering Plants. Ann. Bot. 85, 253-265.  http://aob.oxfordjournals.org/cgi/content/abstract/85/suppl_1/253

Gift N and Stevens PF (1997) Vagaries in the Delimitation of Character States in Quantitative Variation—An Experimental Study. Syst Biol 46, 112-125.  http://sysbio.oxfordjournals.org/cgi/content/abstract/46/1/112

Wollenweber E and H. Dietz V (1981) Occurrence and distribution of free flavonoid aglycones in plants. Phytochemistry 20, 869-932.  http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/0031942281830014

Harborne JB and Williams CA (1973) A chemotaxonomic survey of flavonoids and simple phenols in leaves of the Ericaceae. Botanical Journal of the Linnean Society 66, 37-54.  http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1095-8339.1973.tb02159.x

Harborne JB (1969) Occurrence of flavonol 5-methyl ethers in higher plants and their systematic significance. Phytochemistry 8, 419-423.  http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0031942200854424

Gillespie E and Kron K Molecular phylogenetic relationships and a revised classification of the subfamily Ericoideae (Ericaceae). Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution 56, 343-354.  http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1055790310000965

Li A-M, Wu X-Q, Zhang D-X and Barrett SCH Cryptic dioecy in Mussaenda pubescens (Rubiaceae): a species with stigma-height dimorphism. Ann. Bot. 106, 521-531.  http://aob.oxfordjournals.org/cgi/content/abstract/106/4/521

 


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Grateful acknowledgment is made to the following: for plant names: Australian Plant Name Index, Australian National Herbarium http://www.anbg.gov.au/cpbr/databases/apni-search-full.html; ; The International Plant Names Index, Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew/Harvard University Herbaria/Australian National Herbarium http://www.ipni.org/index.html; Plants Database, United States Department of Agriculture, National Resources Conservation Service http://plants.usda.gov/;DJ Mabberley (1997) The Plant Book, Cambridge University Press (Second Edition); JH Wiersma and B Leon (1999) World Economic Plants, CRC Press; RJ Hnatiuk (1990) Census of Australian Vascular Plants, Australian Government Publishing Service; for information: Science Direct http://www.sciencedirect.com/; Wiley Online Library http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/advanced/search; High Wire http://highwire.stanford.edu/cgi/search; Oxford Journals http://services.oxfordjournals.org/search.dtl; USDA National Agricultural Library http://agricola.nal.usda.gov/booleancube/booleancube_search_cit.html; for synonyms: The Plant List http://www.theplantlist.org/; for common names: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page; etc.


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Latest update March 2017 by: ANCW