Australian New Crops Info 2016
Supported by the Rural Industries Research and Development Corporation

Listing of Interesting Plants of the World:

Kennedia eximia

 

 

This species is usually known as:

Kennedia eximia

 

This species has no synonyms in The Plant List

 

No common names have been found

 

 

Trends (five databases) 1901-2013:
[Number of papers mentioning Kennedia eximia: 5]

 

 

Popularity of Kennedia eximia over time
[Left-hand Plot: Plot of numbers of papers mentioning Kennedia eximia (histogram and left hand axis scale of left-hand plot) and line of best fit, 1901 to 2013 (equation and % variation accounted for in box); Right-hand Plot: Plot of a proportional micro index, derived from numbers of papers mentioning Kennedia eximia as a proportion (scaled by multiplying by one million) of the approximate total number of papers available in databases for that year (frequency polygon and left-hand axis scale of right-hand plot) and line of best fit, 1901 to 2013 (equation and % variation accounted for in box)] 

[For larger charts showing the numbers of papers that have mentioned this species over years, select this link; there are links to come back from there]

 

Keywords

[Total number of keywords included in the papers that mentioned this species: 45]

 

Plant secondary compounds (3), Rumen fermentation (3), antimicrobial activity (2), Australian plant extracts (2), Australian plants (2), Campylobacter jejuni (2), Methane (2), minimal inhibitory concentration (2), Australia (1), beef cattle (1), cattle diseases (1), Conjugated linoleic acids (1), dairy cattle (1), disease prevention (1), Eremophila (1), Eremophila glabra (1), feeds (1), forage evaluation (1), gas production (biological) (1), glycemic effect (1), in vitro digestion (1), Internet resource (1), Kennedia (1), Kennedia prorepens (1), lactates (1), lactic acid bacteria (1), Lactic acidosis (1), pH (1), Plant extract (1), Rumen (1), Rumen bacteria (1), rumen fluids (1), Rumen hydrogenation (1), ruminal acidosis (1), Serrulatane diterpenes (1)

 

[If all keywords are not here (as indicated by .....), they can be accessed from this link; there are links to come back from there]

 

 

Most likely scope for crop use/product (%):
[Please note: When there are only a few papers mentioning a species, care should be taken with the interpretation of these crop use/product results; as well, a mention may relate to the use of a species, or the context in which it grows, rather than a product]

 

pesticide (78.44), essential oil (13.89), timber (2.05), medicinal (0.75), fruit (0.55), poison (0.54), weed (0.41), ornamental (0.35), starch (0.25), cereal (0.17)..

 

[To see the full list of crop use/product outcomes, from searching abstracts of the papers that have mentioned this species, select this link; details of the analysis process have also been included; there are links to come back from there]

 

 

Recent mentions of this species in the literature:
[since 2012, with links to abstracts; The references from 1901-2013 which have been used for the trend, keyword and crop use/product analyses below, are listed below these references]

 

Hallett LM, Standish RJ, Jonson J and Hobbs RJ (2014) Seedling emergence and summer survival after direct seeding for woodland restoration on old fields in south-western Australia. Ecological Management & Restoration 15, 140-146. http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/emr.12110

Hutton PG, Durmic Z, Ghisalberti EL, Flematti GR, Duncan RM, Carson CF, Riley TV and Vercoe PE (2012) Inhibition of ruminal bacteria involved in lactic acid metabolism by extracts from Australian plants. Animal Feed Science and Technology 176, 170-177. http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0377840112002532

Kurekci C, Bishop-Hurley SL, Vercoe PE, Durmic Z, Al Jassim RAM and McSweeney CS (2012) Screening of Australian Plants for Antimicrobial Activity against Campylobacter jejuni. Phytotherapy Research 26, 186-190. http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ptr.3526

 

 

References 1901-2013 (and links to abstracts):
[Number of papers mentioning Kennedia eximia: 5; Any undated papers have been included at the end]

 

Kurekci C, Bishop-Hurley SL, Vercoe PE, Durmic Z, Al Jassim RAM and McSweeney CS (2012) Screening of Australian Plants for Antimicrobial Activity against Campylobacter jejuni. Phytotherapy Research 26, 186-190. http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ptr.3526

Kurekci C, Bishop-Hurley SL, Vercoe PE, Durmic Z, Al Jassim RAM and McSweeney CS (2011) Screening of Australian Plants for Antimicrobial Activity against Campylobacter jejuni. Phytotherapy Research, n/a-n/a. http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ptr.3526

Durmic Z, Hutton P, Revell DK, Emms J, Hughes S and Vercoe PE (2010) In vitro fermentative traits of Australian woody perennial plant species that may be considered as potential sources of feed for grazing ruminants. Animal Feed Science and Technology 160, 98-109. http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0377840110002282

Hutton P, White CL, Durmic Z and Vercoe PE (2009) Eremophila glabra is an Australian plant that reduces lactic acid accumulation in an in vitro glucose challenge designed to simulate lactic acidosis in ruminants. Animal : an international journal of animal bioscience. 3, 1254-1263. http://journals.cambridge.org/

Durmic Z, McSweeney CS, Kemp GW, Hutton P, Wallace RJ and Vercoe PE (2008) Australian plants with potential to inhibit bacteria and processes involved in ruminal biohydrogenation of fatty acids. Animal Feed Science and Technology 145, 271-284. http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0377840107002829

Durmic Z, Hutton P, Revell DK, Emms J, Hughes S and Vercoe PE In vitro fermentative traits of Australian woody perennial plant species that may be considered as potential sources of feed for grazing ruminants. Animal Feed Science and Technology 160, 98-109. http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0377840110002282

Hutton PG, Durmic Z, Ghisalberti EL, Flematti GR, Duncan RM, Carson CF, Riley TV and Vercoe PE Inhibition of ruminal bacteria involved in lactic acid metabolism by extracts from Australian plants. Animal Feed Science and Technology 176, 170-177. http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0377840112002532

 


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Grateful acknowledgment is made to the following: for plant names: Australian Plant Name Index, Australian National Herbarium http://www.anbg.gov.au/cpbr/databases/apni-search-full.html; ; The International Plant Names Index, Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew/Harvard University Herbaria/Australian National Herbarium http://www.ipni.org/index.html; Plants Database, United States Department of Agriculture, National Resources Conservation Service http://plants.usda.gov/;DJ Mabberley (1997) The Plant Book, Cambridge University Press (Second Edition); JH Wiersma and B Leon (1999) World Economic Plants, CRC Press; RJ Hnatiuk (1990) Census of Australian Vascular Plants, Australian Government Publishing Service; for information: Science Direct http://www.sciencedirect.com/; Wiley Online Library http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/advanced/search; High Wire http://highwire.stanford.edu/cgi/search; Oxford Journals http://services.oxfordjournals.org/search.dtl; USDA National Agricultural Library http://agricola.nal.usda.gov/booleancube/booleancube_search_cit.html; for synonyms: The Plant List http://www.theplantlist.org/; for common names: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page; etc.


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Latest update March 2017 by: ANCW