Australian New Crops Info 2016
Supported by the Rural Industries Research and Development Corporation

Listing of Interesting Plants of the World:

Kennedia prorepens

 

 

This species is usually known as:

Kennedia prorepens

 

This species has no synonyms in The Plant List

 

No common names have been found

 

 

Trends (five databases) 1901-2013:
[Number of papers mentioning Kennedia prorepens: 7]

 

 

Popularity of Kennedia prorepens over time
[Left-hand Plot: Plot of numbers of papers mentioning Kennedia prorepens (histogram and left hand axis scale of left-hand plot) and line of best fit, 1901 to 2013 (equation and % variation accounted for in box); Right-hand Plot: Plot of a proportional micro index, derived from numbers of papers mentioning Kennedia prorepens as a proportion (scaled by multiplying by one million) of the approximate total number of papers available in databases for that year (frequency polygon and left-hand axis scale of right-hand plot) and line of best fit, 1901 to 2013 (equation and % variation accounted for in box)] 

[For larger charts showing the numbers of papers that have mentioned this species over years, select this link; there are links to come back from there]

 

Keywords

[Total number of keywords included in the papers that mentioned this species: 90]

 

Australian plants (3), Internet resource (3), Kennedia (3), Plant secondary compounds (3), Rumen fermentation (3), antimicrobial activity (2), Australia (2), Australian plant extracts (2), Campylobacter jejuni (2), Kennedia prorepens (2), Lactic acidosis (2), Methane (2), minimal inhibitory concentration (2), phosphorus (2), Rumen (2), 16S rRNA (1), alfalfa (1), beef cattle (1), Bioactive plants (1), Carboxylate exudation (1), cattle diseases (1), dairy cattle (1), disease prevention (1), Eremophila (1), Eremophila glabra (1), feeds (1), forage crops (1), forage evaluation (1), forage legumes (1), gas production (biological) (1), glycemic effect (1), in vitro digestion (1), Indigenous and exotic legumes (1), lactates (1), lactic acid bacteria (1), Lotus (1), Lotus australis (1), Medicago sativa (1), monocalcium phosphate (1), Native Australian legumes (1), North-west Western Australia (1), novel crops (1), nutrient availability (1), perennial (1), Perennial herbaceous legume (1), perennials (1), pH (1), phenology (1), phosphatases (1), plant nutrition (1), Polymerase chain reaction (1), rhizosphere (1), Rhizosphere pH (1), Rhynchosia (1), Root diameter (1), root growth (1), Root surface area (1), root systems (1), rooting (1), rooting depth (1), Root-nodule bacteria (1), rumen fluids (1), ruminal acidosis (1), Serrulatane diterpenes (1), soil fertility (1), soil treatment (1), spatial distribution (1), Specific root length (1), Swainsona (1), Total root length (1)

 

[If all keywords are not here (as indicated by .....), they can be accessed from this link; there are links to come back from there]

 

 

Most likely scope for crop use/product (%):
[Please note: When there are only a few papers mentioning a species, care should be taken with the interpretation of these crop use/product results; as well, a mention may relate to the use of a species, or the context in which it grows, rather than a product]

 

pesticide (32.28), cereal (30.78), dietary fibre (12.66), cane/bamboo (6.31), grain legume (4.23), essential oil (2.65), medicinal (1.59), fruit (1.16), poison (1.15), weed (0.88)…..

 

[To see the full list of crop use/product outcomes, from searching abstracts of the papers that have mentioned this species, select this link; details of the analysis process have also been included; there are links to come back from there]

 

 

Recent mentions of this species in the literature:
[since 2012, with links to abstracts; The references from 1901-2013 which have been used for the trend, keyword and crop use/product analyses below, are listed below these references]

 

Boldt-Burisch K, Naeth MA, Schneider BU and Hüttl RF (2015) Linkage between root systems of three pioneer plant species and soil nitrogen during early reclamation of a mine site in Lusatia, Germany. Restoration Ecology 23, 357-365. http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/rec.12190

Durmic Z, Moate PJ, Eckard R, Revell DK, Williams R and Vercoe PE (2014) In vitro screening of selected feed additives, plant essential oils and plant extracts for rumen methane mitigation. Journal of the Science of Food and Agriculture 94, 1191-1196. http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/jsfa.6396

Bell LW, Ryan MH, Bennett RG, Collins MT and Clarke HJ (2012) Growth, yield and seed composition of native Australian legumes with potential as grain crops. Journal of the Science of Food and Agriculture 92, 1354-1361. http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/jsfa.4706

Kurekci C, Bishop-Hurley SL, Vercoe PE, Durmic Z, Al Jassim RAM and McSweeney CS (2012) Screening of Australian Plants for Antimicrobial Activity against Campylobacter jejuni. Phytotherapy Research 26, 186-190. http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ptr.3526

 

 

References 1901-2013 (and links to abstracts):
[Number of papers mentioning Kennedia prorepens: 7; Any undated papers have been included at the end]

 

Bell LW, Ryan MH, Bennett RG, Collins MT and Clarke HJ (2012) Growth, yield and seed composition of native Australian legumes with potential as grain crops. Journal of the Science of Food and Agriculture 92, 1354-1361.  http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/jsfa.4706

Kurekci C, Bishop-Hurley SL, Vercoe PE, Durmic Z, Al Jassim RAM and McSweeney CS (2012) Screening of Australian Plants for Antimicrobial Activity against Campylobacter jejuni. Phytotherapy Research 26, 186-190.  http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ptr.3526

Kurekci C, Bishop-Hurley SL, Vercoe PE, Durmic Z, Al Jassim RAM and McSweeney CS (2011) Screening of Australian Plants for Antimicrobial Activity against Campylobacter jejuni. Phytotherapy Research, n/a-n/a.  http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ptr.3526

Durmic Z, Hutton P, Revell DK, Emms J, Hughes S and Vercoe PE (2010) In vitro fermentative traits of Australian woody perennial plant species that may be considered as potential sources of feed for grazing ruminants. Animal Feed Science and Technology 160, 98-109.  http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0377840110002282

Hutton P, White CL, Durmic Z and Vercoe PE (2009) Eremophila glabra is an Australian plant that reduces lactic acid accumulation in an in vitro glucose challenge designed to simulate lactic acidosis in ruminants. Animal : an international journal of animal bioscience. 3, 1254-1263.  http://journals.cambridge.org/

Denton MD, Sasse C, Tibbett M and Ryan MH (2006) Root distributions of Australian herbaceous perennial legumes in response to phosphorus placement. Functional plant biology : FPB. 33, 12.  http://www.publish.csiro.au/journals/fpb/

Yates RJ, Howieson JG, Nandasena KG and O’Hara GW (2004) Root-nodule bacteria from indigenous legumes in the north-west of Western Australia and their interaction with exotic legumes. Soil Biology and Biochemistry 36, 1319-1329.  http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0038071704001300

Durmic Z, Hutton P, Revell DK, Emms J, Hughes S and Vercoe PE In vitro fermentative traits of Australian woody perennial plant species that may be considered as potential sources of feed for grazing ruminants. Animal Feed Science and Technology 160, 98-109.  http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0377840110002282

Durmic Z, Hutton PG, K.Murray and Vercoe PE Inclusion of selected levels of Australian native plant Eremophila glabra in fermentation substrate can influence events leading to rumen lactic acidosis in in vitro and in vivo carbohydrate-challenged systems. Animal Feed Science and Technology 178, 57-66.  http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0377840112003409

Hutton PG, Durmic Z, Ghisalberti EL, Flematti GR, Duncan RM, Carson CF, Riley TV and Vercoe PE Inhibition of ruminal bacteria involved in lactic acid metabolism by extracts from Australian plants. Animal Feed Science and Technology 176, 170-177.  http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0377840112002532

Pang J, Ryan MH, Tibbett M, Cawthray GR, Siddique KHM, Bolland MDA, Denton MD and Lambers H Variation in morphological and physiological parameters in herbaceous perennial legumes in response to phosphorus supply. Plant and soil. 331, 241-255.  http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11104-009-0249-x

 


RIRDC Farm Diversity Website: http://www.farmdiversity.com.au/

 

Rural Industries Research and Development Corporation (RIRDC)
Home Page

RIRDC New and Developing Plant Industries
Home Page

includes publications and project reports

RIRDC New Crop Industries Handbook
530 pages
as pdf download


RIRDC
essential oils, tea tree oil, wildflowers and natives, bioenergy, organic farming


Grateful acknowledgment is made to the following: for plant names: Australian Plant Name Index, Australian National Herbarium http://www.anbg.gov.au/cpbr/databases/apni-search-full.html; ; The International Plant Names Index, Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew/Harvard University Herbaria/Australian National Herbarium http://www.ipni.org/index.html; Plants Database, United States Department of Agriculture, National Resources Conservation Service http://plants.usda.gov/;DJ Mabberley (1997) The Plant Book, Cambridge University Press (Second Edition); JH Wiersma and B Leon (1999) World Economic Plants, CRC Press; RJ Hnatiuk (1990) Census of Australian Vascular Plants, Australian Government Publishing Service; for information: Science Direct http://www.sciencedirect.com/; Wiley Online Library http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/advanced/search; High Wire http://highwire.stanford.edu/cgi/search; Oxford Journals http://services.oxfordjournals.org/search.dtl; USDA National Agricultural Library http://agricola.nal.usda.gov/booleancube/booleancube_search_cit.html; for synonyms: The Plant List http://www.theplantlist.org/; for common names: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page; etc.


All information is included in good faith but this website does not warrant or guarantee the accuracy of any information on these pages, nor does the website accept responsibility for any loss arising from the use of this information.  Views and opinions are those of the authors themselves.  Every effort has been made to respect copyright owners' rights. 


Contact: Webmaster, Australian New Crops Website
australiannewcrops@gmail.com
Latest update March 2017 by: ANCW