Australian New Crops Info 2016
Supported by the Rural Industries Research and Development Corporation

Listing of Interesting Plants of the World:

Narcissus X

 

 

This species name was not found in The Plant List

 

This species has no synonyms in The Plant List

 

No common names have been found

 

 

Trends (five databases) 1901-2013:
[Number of papers mentioning Narcissus X: 13]

 

 

Popularity of Narcissus X over time
[Left-hand Plot: Plot of numbers of papers mentioning Narcissus X (histogram and left hand axis scale of left-hand plot) and line of best fit, 1901 to 2013 (equation and % variation accounted for in box); Right-hand Plot: Plot of a proportional micro index, derived from numbers of papers mentioning Narcissus X as a proportion (scaled by multiplying by one million) of the approximate total number of papers available in databases for that year (frequency polygon and left-hand axis scale of right-hand plot) and line of best fit, 1901 to 2013 (equation and % variation accounted for in box)] 

[For larger charts showing the numbers of papers that have mentioned this species over years, select this link; there are links to come back from there]

 

Keywords

[Total number of keywords included in the papers that mentioned this species: 46]

 

Narcissus (4), hybrids (3), Spain (3), identification (2), new taxa (2), asexual fitness (1), Asparagales (1), cox3 (1), cpDNA (1), ecosystem engineer (1), exotic species (1), hybridization (1), hydrogeomorphic disturbance (1), interspecific hybridization (1), invasibility (1), ITS (1), Mediterranean riparian system (1), mtDNA (1), narcissus x neocarpetanus nothovar. romanensis (1), narcissus x susannae nm. toletanus (1), niche competition (1), niche modeling (1), parental extirpation (1), plant breeding (1), plant genetics (1), Plant mitochondria (1), plant–plant interactions (1), pollen (1), Portugal (1), Retroprocessing events (1), RNA editing loss (1), rps13 (1), sexual fitness (1), species richness (1), transplant experiments (1), varieties (1), wild plants (1)

 

[If all keywords are not here (as indicated by .....), they can be accessed from this link; there are links to come back from there]

 

 

Most likely scope for crop use/product (%):
[Please note: When there are only a few papers mentioning a species, care should be taken with the interpretation of these crop use/product results; as well, a mention may relate to the use of a species, or the context in which it grows, rather than a product]

 

boundary (50.87), timber (24.09), fruit (8.85), medicinal (2.35), poison (1.70), weed (1.30), ornamental (1.09), starch (0.78), cereal (0.55), nutraceutical (0.54)…..

 

[To see the full list of crop use/product outcomes, from searching abstracts of the papers that have mentioned this species, select this link; details of the analysis process have also been included; there are links to come back from there]

 

 

Recent mentions of this species in the literature:
[since 2012, with links to abstracts; The references from 1901-2013 which have been used for the trend, keyword and crop use/product analyses below, are listed below these references]

 

Huang L, Wang Y, Meng ZY, Du L, Werner P and Dai X (2015): An open source continuous-time quantum Monte Carlo impurity solver toolkit. Computer Physics Communications 195, 140-160. //www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0010465515001629

Jackiw RN, Mandil G and Hager HA (2015) A framework to guide the conservation of species hybrids based on ethical and ecological considerations. Conservation Biology 29, 1040-1051. http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/cobi.12526

Corenblit D, Steiger J, Tabacchi E, González E and Planty-Tabacchi AM (2014) ECOSYSTEM ENGINEERS MODULATE EXOTIC INVASIONS IN RIPARIAN PLANT COMMUNITIES BY MODIFYING HYDROGEOMORPHIC CONNECTIVITY. River Research and Applications 30, 45-59. http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/rra.2618

Corenblit D, Steiger J, Tabacchi E, González E and Planty-Tabacchi AM (2012) ECOSYSTEM ENGINEERS MODULATE EXOTIC INVASIONS IN RIPARIAN PLANT COMMUNITIES BY MODIFYING HYDROGEOMORPHIC CONNECTIVITY. River Research and Applications, n/a-n/a. http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/rra.2618

Marques I, Nieto Feliner G, Martins-Loução MA and Fuertes Aguilar J (2012) Genome size and base composition variation in natural and experimental Narcissus (Amaryllidaceae) hybrids. Annals of botany. 109, 257-264.

 

References 1901-2013 (and links to abstracts):
[Number of papers mentioning Narcissus X: 13; Any undated papers have been included at the end]

 

Corenblit D, Steiger J, Tabacchi E, González E and Planty-Tabacchi AM (2012) ECOSYSTEM ENGINEERS MODULATE EXOTIC INVASIONS IN RIPARIAN PLANT COMMUNITIES BY MODIFYING HYDROGEOMORPHIC CONNECTIVITY. River Research and Applications, n/a-n/a.  http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/rra.2618

Marques I, Nieto Feliner G, Martins-Loução MA and Fuertes Aguilar J (2011) Fitness in Narcissus hybrids: low fertility is overcome by early hybrid vigour, absence of exogenous selection and high bulb propagation. Journal of Ecology 99, 1508-1519.  http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1365-2745.2011.01876.x

Marques I, Feliner G, Draper Munt D, Martins-Loucao M and Aguilar J (2010) Unraveling cryptic reticulate relationships and the origin of orphan hybrid disjunct populations in Narcissus. Evolution 64, 2353-68.

Marques I, Feliner GN, Draper Munt D, Martins-Loução MA and Aguilar JF (2010) UNRAVELING CRYPTIC RETICULATE RELATIONSHIPS AND THE ORIGIN OF ORPHAN HYBRID DISJUNCT POPULATIONS IN NARCISSUS. Evolution 64, 2353-2368.  http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1558-5646.2010.00983.x

Lopez L, Picardi E and Quagliariello C (2007) RNA editing has been lost in the mitochondrial cox3 and rps13 mRNAs in Asparagales. Biochimie 89, 159-167.  http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0300908406002148

(2003) Glossary. In ‘Encyclopedia of Rose Science’ (Ed.^(Eds Editor-in-Chief:   Andrew VR) pp. 841-1450. (Elsevier: Oxford). http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/B0122276205900120

Bastida J, Viladomat F and Codina C (1997) Narcissus alkaloids. In ‘Studies in Natural Products Chemistry’ (Ed.^(Eds Atta ur R) pp. 323-405. (Elsevier). http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1572599597800348

Dora H and Fernandez Casas J (1987) Narcissus X turgaliensis, a new wild prickly oak. Narcissus X turgaliensis, nuevo mesto silvestre. Boletim da Sociedade Broteriana., 60.

Fernandez Casas J and Luceno M (1986) A new Narcissus in Toledo. Un nuevo mesto de Narcissus en Toledo. Anales del Jardin Botanico de Madrid., 1.

Urena Plaza JF (1986) A new nothovariety of Narcissus. Una nueva notovariedad de Narcissus. Anales del Jardin Botanico de Madrid., 1.

Fernandes A (1983) Two spontaneous Narcissus hybrids in Portugal [Narcissus X Christianssenii, Narcissus rupicola X Narcissus triandrus subsp. triandrus as the parnets, Narcissus X brevitubulosus, Narcissus asturiensis X Narcissus bulbocodium as the parents]. Deut hybrides de Narcissus spontanes au Portugal. Anuario da Sociedade Broteriana., 49.

Fernandes A (1977) On the caryology of Narcissus X Hannibalis. Sur la caryologie de Narcissus X Hannibalis. Boletim 2, 51.

Stant MY (1952) The Shoot Apex of Some Monocotyledons: I. Structure and Development. Ann. Bot. 16, 115-129.  http://aob.oxfordjournals.org/cgi/content/abstract/16/1/115

Marques I, Feliner GN, Draper Munt D, Martins-Loucao MA and Aguilar JF Unraveling cryptic reticulate relationships and the origin of orphan hybrid disjunct populations in Narcissus. Evolution 64, 2353-68.

 


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Grateful acknowledgment is made to the following: for plant names: Australian Plant Name Index, Australian National Herbarium http://www.anbg.gov.au/cpbr/databases/apni-search-full.html; ; The International Plant Names Index, Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew/Harvard University Herbaria/Australian National Herbarium http://www.ipni.org/index.html; Plants Database, United States Department of Agriculture, National Resources Conservation Service http://plants.usda.gov/;DJ Mabberley (1997) The Plant Book, Cambridge University Press (Second Edition); JH Wiersma and B Leon (1999) World Economic Plants, CRC Press; RJ Hnatiuk (1990) Census of Australian Vascular Plants, Australian Government Publishing Service; for information: Science Direct http://www.sciencedirect.com/; Wiley Online Library http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/advanced/search; High Wire http://highwire.stanford.edu/cgi/search; Oxford Journals http://services.oxfordjournals.org/search.dtl; USDA National Agricultural Library http://agricola.nal.usda.gov/booleancube/booleancube_search_cit.html; for synonyms: The Plant List http://www.theplantlist.org/; for common names: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page; etc.


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