Australian New Crops Info 2016
Supported by the Rural Industries Research and Development Corporation

Listing of Interesting Plants of the World:

Nematolepis squamea

 

 

This species is usually known as:

Nematolepis squamea, Nematolepis squamea subsp. coriacea, Nematolepis squamea subsp. retusa

 

This species has no synonyms in The Plant List

 

Common names:

Satinwood

 

 

Trends (five databases) 1901-2013:
[Number of papers mentioning Nematolepis squamea: 12]

 

 

Popularity of Nematolepis squamea over time
[Left-hand Plot: Plot of numbers of papers mentioning Nematolepis squamea (histogram and left hand axis scale of left-hand plot) and line of best fit, 1901 to 2013 (equation and % variation accounted for in box); Right-hand Plot: Plot of a proportional micro index, derived from numbers of papers mentioning Nematolepis squamea as a proportion (scaled by multiplying by one million) of the approximate total number of papers available in databases for that year (frequency polygon and left-hand axis scale of right-hand plot) and line of best fit, 1901 to 2013 (equation and % variation accounted for in box)] 

[For larger charts showing the numbers of papers that have mentioned this species over years, select this link; there are links to come back from there]

 

Keywords

[Total number of keywords included in the papers that mentioned this species: 95]

 

Tasmania (4), Wildfire (4), Regeneration (3), Variable retention (3), Australia (2), biodiversity (2), Bryophyte (2), Conservation (2), Cool temperate eucalypt forest (2), Ectomycorrhizal (2), Epigeous (2), Eucalyptus obliqua (2), Fire intensity (2), Floristic composition (2), Ground-beetles (2), Macrofungi (2), Mechanical disturbance (2), Mixed forest (2), Native eucalypt forest (2), Old growth (2), Reservation (2), Set-asides (2), Succession (2), Wildlife corridors (2), adaptation (1), altitudinal gradient (1), Brown Barrel (1), Bryophyta (1), Bryophytes (1), Chrysanthemoides monilifera ssp. rotundata (1), Climate change (1), Control (1), Decadal change (1), Diameter (1), dispersal limitation (1), ecological community (1), edge effect (1), Epiphyte succession (1), Eucalyptus fastigata (1), Exotic (1), habitat fragmentation (1), habitat loss (1), insect (1), invertebrate (1), island biogeography (1), Lichens (1), Logging (1), long-term monitoring (1), mass effects (1), Multi-cohort forest (1), neutral theory (1), Oldgrowth forest (1), Oldgrowth indicators (1), Propagule (1), quantitative analysis (1), Recruitment (1), Regeneration burning (1), Seedbed (1), Silvicultural systems (1), species assemblage (1), Species richness (1), Stand replacing (1), Tall open-forest (1), Tree age (1), Vascular plants (1)

 

[If all keywords are not here (as indicated by .....), they can be accessed from this link; there are links to come back from there]

 

 

Most likely scope for crop use/product (%):
[Please note: When there are only a few papers mentioning a species, care should be taken with the interpretation of these crop use/product results; as well, a mention may relate to the use of a species, or the context in which it grows, rather than a product]

 

ornamental (78.37), timber (8.22), medicinal (1.88), fruit (1.37), poison (1.36), starch (0.62), weed (0.60), cereal (0.44), nutraceutical (0.43), grain legume (0.43)..

 

[To see the full list of crop use/product outcomes, from searching abstracts of the papers that have mentioned this species, select this link; details of the analysis process have also been included; there are links to come back from there]

 

 

Recent mentions of this species in the literature:
[since 2012, with links to abstracts; The references from 1901-2013 which have been used for the trend, keyword and crop use/product analyses below, are listed below these references]

 

Herr A, Dambacher JM, Pinkard E, Glen M, Mohammed C and Wardlaw T (2016) The uncertain impact of climate change on forest ecosystems How qualitative modelling can guide future research for quantitative model development. Environmental Modelling & Software 76, 95-107. //www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1364815215300815

Baker SC, Garandel M, Deltombe M and Neyland MG (2013) Factors influencing initial vascular plant seedling composition following either aggregated retention harvesting and regeneration burning or burning of unharvested forest. Forest Ecology and Management 306, 192-201. //www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0378112713003952

Bowman DMJS, Wood SW, Neyland D, Sanders GJ and Prior LD (2013) Contracting Tasmanian montane grasslands within a forest matrix is consistent with cessation of Aboriginal fire management. Austral Ecology 38, 627-638. http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/aec.12008

Hindrum L, Hovenden MJ, Neyland MG and Baker SC (2012) The effects of mechanical disturbance and burn intensity on the floristic composition of two-year old aggregated retention coupes in Tasmanian wet eucalypt forests. Forest Ecology and Management 279, 55-65. http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0378112712002587

 

 

References 1901-2013 (and links to abstracts):
[Number of papers mentioning Nematolepis squamea: 12; Any undated papers have been included at the end]

 

Hindrum L, Hovenden MJ, Neyland MG and Baker SC (2012) The effects of mechanical disturbance and burn intensity on the floristic composition of two-year old aggregated retention coupes in Tasmanian wet eucalypt forests. Forest Ecology and Management 279, 55-65. http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0378112712002587

Gates GM, Mohammed C, Ratkowsky DA, Wardlaw T and Davidson NJ (2011) Diversity and ecology of epigeous ectomycorrhizal macrofungal assemblages in a native wet eucalypt forest in Tasmania, Australia. Fungal Ecology 4, 290-298. http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1754504811000201

Turner PAM, Kirkpatrick JB and Pharo EJ (2011) Dependence of bryophyte species on young, mature and old growth wet eucalypt forest. Biological Conservation 144, 2951-2957. http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0006320711003375

Driscoll DA, Kirkpatrick JB, McQuillan PB and Bonham KJ (2010) Classic metapopulations are rare among common beetle species from a naturally fragmented landscape. Journal of Animal Ecology 79, 294-303. http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1365-2656.2009.01609.x

Simon J G (2010) Do wildlife habitat strips act as refuges for mature-forest carabid beetle assemblages? A case-study in Tasmanian wet eucalypt forest, Australia. Forest Ecology and Management 259, 496-504. http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S037811270900807X

Kendall P and Snelson B (2009) The role of floristic survey data and quantitative analysis in identification and description of ecological communities under threatened species legislation: A case study from north-eastern New South Wales. Ecological Management & Restoration 10, S16-S26. http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1442-8903.2009.00454.x

Neyland M, Hickey J, Beadle C, Bauhus J, Davidson N and Edwards L (2009) An examination of stocking and early growth in the Warra silvicultural systems trial confirms the importance of a burnt seedbed for vigorous regeneration in Eucalyptus obliqua forest. Forest Ecology and Management 258, 481-494. http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0378112708008153

Turner PAM, Balmer J and Kirkpatrick JB (2009) Stand-replacing wildfires?: The incidence of multi-cohort and single-cohort Eucalyptus regnans and E. obliqua forests in southern Tasmania. Forest Ecology and Management 258, 366-375. http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0378112709003260

Turner PAM and Kirkpatrick JB (2009) Do logging, followed by burning, and wildfire differ in their decadal scale effects on tall open-forest bryophytes and vascular plants? Forest Ecology and Management 258, 679-686. http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0378112709003387

Mason TJ, French K and Russell KG (2007) Moderate impacts of plant invasion and management regimes in coastal hind dune seed banks. Biological Conservation 134, 428-439. http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0006320706003752

Kantvilas G and Jarman SJ (2004) Lichens and bryophytes on Eucalyptus obliqua in Tasmania: management implications in production forests. Biological Conservation 117, 359-373. http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0006320703003124

Doran NE, Balmer J, Driessen M, Bashford R, Grove S, Richardson AM, Griggs J and Ziegeler D (2003) Moving with the times: baseline data to gauge future shifts in vegetation and invertebrate altitudinal assemblages due to environmental change. Organisms Diversity & Evolution 3, 127-149. http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S143960920470063X

Gates GM, Mohammed C, Ratkowsky DA, Wardlaw T and Davidson NJ Diversity and ecology of epigeous ectomycorrhizal macrofungal assemblages in a native wet eucalypt forest in Tasmania, Australia. Fungal Ecology 4, 290-298. http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1754504811000201

Grove SJ Do wildlife habitat strips act as refuges for mature-forest carabid beetle assemblages? A case-study in Tasmanian wet eucalypt forest, Australia. Forest Ecology and Management 259, 496-504. http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S037811270900807X

Hindrum L, Hovenden MJ, Neyland MG and Baker SC The effects of mechanical disturbance and burn intensity on the floristic composition of two-year old aggregated retention coupes in Tasmanian wet eucalypt forests. Forest Ecology and Management 279, 55-65. http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0378112712002587

Turner PAM, Kirkpatrick JB and Pharo EJ Dependence of bryophyte species on young, mature and old growth wet eucalypt forest. Biological Conservation. http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0006320711003375

 


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Grateful acknowledgment is made to the following: for plant names: Australian Plant Name Index, Australian National Herbarium http://www.anbg.gov.au/cpbr/databases/apni-search-full.html; ; The International Plant Names Index, Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew/Harvard University Herbaria/Australian National Herbarium http://www.ipni.org/index.html; Plants Database, United States Department of Agriculture, National Resources Conservation Service http://plants.usda.gov/;DJ Mabberley (1997) The Plant Book, Cambridge University Press (Second Edition); JH Wiersma and B Leon (1999) World Economic Plants, CRC Press; RJ Hnatiuk (1990) Census of Australian Vascular Plants, Australian Government Publishing Service; for information: Science Direct http://www.sciencedirect.com/; Wiley Online Library http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/advanced/search; High Wire http://highwire.stanford.edu/cgi/search; Oxford Journals http://services.oxfordjournals.org/search.dtl; USDA National Agricultural Library http://agricola.nal.usda.gov/booleancube/booleancube_search_cit.html; for synonyms: The Plant List http://www.theplantlist.org/; for common names: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page; etc.


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