Australian New Crops Info 2016
Supported by the Rural Industries Research and Development Corporation

Listing of Interesting Plants of the World:

Nepenthes mirabilis

 

 

This species is usually known as:

Nepenthes mirabilis, Nepenthes mirabilis var. echinostoma

 

This species has no synonyms in The Plant List

 

Common names:

Common Swamp Pitcher-Plant

 

 

Trends (five databases) 1901-2013:
[Number of papers mentioning Nepenthes mirabilis: 36]

 

 

Popularity of Nepenthes mirabilis over time
[Left-hand Plot: Plot of numbers of papers mentioning Nepenthes mirabilis (histogram and left hand axis scale of left-hand plot) and line of best fit, 1901 to 2013 (equation and % variation accounted for in box); Right-hand Plot: Plot of a proportional micro index, derived from numbers of papers mentioning Nepenthes mirabilis as a proportion (scaled by multiplying by one million) of the approximate total number of papers available in databases for that year (frequency polygon and left-hand axis scale of right-hand plot) and line of best fit, 1901 to 2013 (equation and % variation accounted for in box)] 

[For larger charts showing the numbers of papers that have mentioned this species over years, select this link; there are links to come back from there]

 

Keywords

[Total number of keywords included in the papers that mentioned this species: 134]

 

Carnivorous plants (8), Nepenthes (6), Digestion fluid (3), Hydrolytic enzymes (3), Nepenthes spp. (3), phylogeny (3), Pitcher trap (3), PR proteins (3), nepenthes mirabilis (2), nitrogen (2), Aedes (1), Aedes dybasi (1), Aedes hensilli (1), Aedes maehleri (1), Aedes palauensis (1), Ammonium (1), animal morphology (1), animal taxonomy (1), Antibacterial activity (1), Antifungal activity (1), Attachment system (1), Bemisia tabaci (1), bioavailability (1), biochemical systematics (1), body measurements (1), Borneo, carnivory, Nepenthes albomarginata, Nepenthes rafflesiana, photosynthesis, stable isotopes, termites (1), breeding sites (1), Brunei (1), cell walls, lignin (1), China (1), chlorophyll fluorescence (1), commensalism (1), Composite structure (1), conservation (1), cost-benefit models (1), Cytoimmunochemistry (1), Cytosol (1), demography (1), diferulic acid (1), divergent evolution (1), Ecology (1), ecophysiology (1), fecundity (1), Federated States of Micronesia (1), ferulic acid (1), Glutamate dehydrogenase (1), Grain yield (1), host plant (1), Insect (1), insect development (1), insect ecology (1), insect reproduction (1), Internet resource (1), larvae (1), larval development (1), Magnoliatae (1), mating behavior (1), microhabitats (1), Mitochondria (1), molecular sequence data (1), molecular systematics (1), morphometry (1), natural enemy (1), nectar secretion (1), nectaries (1), Nematoda (1), nepenthes albomarginata (1), nepenthes bicalcarata (1), nepenthes gracilis (1), nepenthes mirabilis var. echinostoma (1), nepenthes rafflesiana (1), new genus (1), new species (1), nitrogen sequestration (1), nucleotide sequences (1), Nutrient uptake (1), nutrition (1), Palau (1), Panagrolaimidae (1), patterns (1), p-coumaric acid (1), phenolic acids (1), Phloem (1), photosynthesis (1), p-hydroxybenzoic acid (1), Phylloplane fungi (1), pitcher fluid (1), pitcher plant (1), Pitcher plants (1), Pitcher surface (1), plant morphology (1), plant nutrition (1), Plants of Malaysia (1), pollination (1), predator-prey interactions (1), ribosomal DNA (1), Stegomyia (1), survey (1), symbiosis (1), Thailand (1), traits (1), trap geometry (1), tree shrew (1), trophic relationships (1), ultrastructure (1), UV fluorescence microscopy (1), Yap (1), Yeasts (1)

 

[If all keywords are not here (as indicated by .....), they can be accessed from this link; there are links to come back from there]

 

 

Most likely scope for crop use/product (%):
[Please note: When there are only a few papers mentioning a species, care should be taken with the interpretation of these crop use/product results; as well, a mention may relate to the use of a species, or the context in which it grows, rather than a product]

 

insectivorous (99.69), nutraceutical (0.10), hemiparasite (0.03), timber (0.02), fruit (0.02), medicinal (0.02), weed (0.01), ornamental (0.01), starch (0.01), grain legume (0.01)…..

 

[To see the full list of crop use/product outcomes, from searching abstracts of the papers that have mentioned this species, select this link; details of the analysis process have also been included; there are links to come back from there]

 

 

Recent mentions of this species in the literature:
[since 2012, with links to abstracts; The references from 1901-2013 which have been used for the trend, keyword and crop use/product analyses below, are listed below these references]

 

Paniw M, Gil-Cabeza E and Ojeda F (2017) Plant carnivory beyond bogs: reliance on prey feeding in Drosophyllum lusitanicum (Drosophyllaceae) in dry Mediterranean heathland habitats. Ann. Bot., mcw247. http://aob.oxfordjournals.org/cgi/content/abstract/mcw247v1

Butts CT, Bierma JC and Martin RW (2016) Novel proteases from the genome of the carnivorous plant Drosera capensis: Structural prediction and comparative analysis. Proteins: Structure, Function, and Bioinformatics 84, 1517-1533. http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/prot.25095

Gaume L, Bazile V, Huguin M and Bonhomme V (2016) Different pitcher shapes and trapping syndromes explain resource partitioning in Nepenthes species. Ecology and Evolution 6, 1378-1392. http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ece3.1920

Leroy C, Carrias J-F, Cereghino R and Corbara B (2016) The contribution of microorganisms and metazoans to mineral nutrition in bromeliads. J Plant Ecol 9, 241-255. http://jpe.oxfordjournals.org/cgi/content/abstract/9/3/241

Miguel S, Biteau F, Mignard B, Marais A, Candresse T, Theil S, Bourgaud F and Hehn A (2016) Beet western yellows virus infects the carnivorous plant Nepenthes mirabilis. Archives of virology. 161, 2273-2278. http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00705-016-2891-y

Rottloff S, Miguel S, et al. (2016) Proteome analysis of digestive fluids in Nepenthes pitchers. Ann. Bot. 117, 479-495. http://aob.oxfordjournals.org/cgi/content/abstract/117/3/479

Schöner CR, Schöner MG, Grafe TU, Clarke CM, Dombrowski L, Tan MC and Kerth G (2016) Ecological outsourcing: a pitcher plant benefits from transferring pre-digestion of prey to a bat mutualist. Journal of Ecology, n/a-n/a. http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/1365-2745.12653

Schwallier R, Raes N, de Boer HJ, Vos RA, van Vugt RR and Gravendeel B (2016) Phylogenetic analysis of niche divergence reveals distinct evolutionary histories and climate change implications for tropical carnivorous pitcher plants. Diversity and Distributions 22, 97-110. http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/ddi.12382

Trinh BTD, Staerk D and Jäger AK (2016) Screening for potential α-glucosidase and α-amylase inhibitory constituents from selected Vietnamese plants used to treat type 2 diabetes. Journal of Ethnopharmacology 186, 189-195. //www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S037887411630174X

Yilamujiang A, Reichelt M, Mitho, #x and fer A (2016) Slow food: insect prey and chitin induce phytohormone accumulation and gene expression in carnivorous Nepenthes plants. Ann. Bot. 118, 369-375. http://aob.oxfordjournals.org/cgi/content/abstract/118/2/369

(2015) Contents (graphical abstracts and research highlights). Phytochemistry Letters 11, v-xxiv. //www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1874390015000439

Amin R, Edraki M, Mulligan DR and Gultom TH (2015) Chromium and nickel accumulation in the macrophytes of the Kawasi wetland on Obi Island, North Maluku Province, Indonesia. Australian journal of botany. 63, 7. http://dx.doi.org/10.1071/BT15066

Chou LY, Wilson RF, Dykes GA and Clarke CM (2015) Why are Aedes mosquitoes rare colonisers of Nepenthes pitcher plants? Ecological Entomology 40, 603-611. http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/een.12222

Kant MR, Jonckheere W, et al. (2015) Mechanisms and ecological consequences of plant defence induction and suppression in herbivore communities. Ann. Bot. 115, 1015-1051. http://aob.oxfordjournals.org/cgi/content/abstract/115/7/1015

Pavlovi, #x010D,  A and Saganova M (2015) A novel insight into the cost-benefit model for the evolution of botanical carnivory. Ann. Bot. 115, 1075-1092. http://aob.oxfordjournals.org/cgi/content/abstract/115/7/1075

Thanh NV, Thao NP, et al. (2015) Naphthoquinone and flavonoid constituents from the carnivorous plant Nepenthes mirabilis and their anti-osteoporotic and antioxidant activities. Phytochemistry Letters 11, 254-259. //www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1874390015000105

(2014) Graphical Contents List. Phytochemistry 100, 1-5. //www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0031942214000855

Baskin CC and Baskin JM (2014) Chapter 11 - Germination Ecology of Plants with Specialized Life Cycles and/or Habitats. In ‘Seeds (Second Edition)’ (Ed.^(Eds  pp. 869-1004. (Academic Press: San Diego). //www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/B9780124166776000111

Buch F, Pauchet Y, Rott M and Mithöfer A (2014) Characterization and heterologous expression of a PR-1 protein from traps of the carnivorous plant Nepenthes mirabilis. Phytochemistry 100, 43-50. //www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0031942214000387

Chou LY, Clarke CM and Dykes GA (2014) Bacterial communities associated with the pitcher fluids of three Nepenthes (Nepenthaceae) pitcher plant species growing in the wild. Archives of microbiology. 196, 709-717. http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00203-014-1011-1

Leroy C, Carrias J-F, Corbara B, Pelozuelo L, Dezerald O, Brouard O, Dejean A and Cereghino R (2013) Mutualistic ants contribute to tank-bromeliad nutrition. Ann. Bot. 112, 919-926. http://aob.oxfordjournals.org/cgi/content/abstract/112/5/919

Moran JA, Gray LK, Clarke C and Chin L (2013) Capture mechanism in Palaeotropical pitcher plants (Nepenthaceae) is constrained by climate. Ann. Bot., mct195. http://aob.oxfordjournals.org/cgi/content/abstract/mct195v1

Nishi AH, Vasconcellos-Neto J and Romero GQ (2013) The role of multiple partners in a digestive mutualism with a protocarnivorous plant. Ann. Bot. 111, 143-150. http://aob.oxfordjournals.org/cgi/content/abstract/111/1/143

Arsova B, Kierszniowska S and Schulze WX (2012) The use of heavy nitrogen in quantitative proteomics experiments in plants. Trends in Plant Science 17, 102-112. http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1360138511002330

Renner T and Specht CD (2012) Molecular and Functional Evolution of Class I Chitinases for Plant Carnivory in the Caryophyllales. Mol. Biol. Evol. 29, 2971-2985. http://mbe.oxfordjournals.org/cgi/content/abstract/29/10/2971

 

 

References 1901-2013 (and links to abstracts):
[Number of papers mentioning Nepenthes mirabilis: 36; Any undated papers have been included at the end]

 

Leroy C, Carrias J-F, Corbara B, Pelozuelo L, Dezerald O, Brouard O, Dejean A and Cereghino R (2013) Mutualistic ants contribute to tank-bromeliad nutrition. Ann. Bot. 112, 919-926.  http://aob.oxfordjournals.org/cgi/content/abstract/112/5/919

Moran JA, Gray LK, Clarke C and Chin L (2013) Capture mechanism in Palaeotropical pitcher plants (Nepenthaceae) is constrained by climate. Ann. Bot., mct195.  http://aob.oxfordjournals.org/cgi/content/abstract/mct195v1

Nishi AH, Vasconcellos-Neto J and Romero GQ (2013) The role of multiple partners in a digestive mutualism with a protocarnivorous plant. Ann. Bot. 111, 143-150.  http://aob.oxfordjournals.org/cgi/content/abstract/111/1/143

Arsova B, Kierszniowska S and Schulze WX (2012) The use of heavy nitrogen in quantitative proteomics experiments in plants. Trends in Plant Science 17, 102-112.  http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1360138511002330

Renner T and Specht CD (2012) Molecular and Functional Evolution of Class I Chitinases for Plant Carnivory in the Caryophyllales. Mol. Biol. Evol. 29, 2971-2985.  http://mbe.oxfordjournals.org/cgi/content/abstract/29/10/2971

Adlassnig W, Peroutka M and Lendl T (2011) Traps of carnivorous pitcher plants as a habitat: composition of the fluid, biodiversity and mutualistic activities. Ann. Bot. 107, 181-194.  http://aob.oxfordjournals.org/cgi/content/abstract/107/2/181

Axel M (2011) Carnivorous pitcher plants: Insights in an old topic. Phytochemistry 72, 1678-1682.  http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0031942210004450

Li S-J, Xue X, Ahmed MZ, Ren S-X, Du Y-Z, Wu J-H, Cuthbertson AGS and Qiu B-L (2011) Host plants and natural enemies of Bemisia tabaci (Hemiptera: Aleyrodidae) in China. Insect Science 18, 101-120.  http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1744-7917.2010.01395.x

Mithöfer A (2011) Carnivorous pitcher plants: Insights in an old topic. Phytochemistry 72, 1678-1682.  http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0031942210004450

PavloviČ A, SlovÁKovÁ Ľ and ŠAntrŮČEk J (2011) Nutritional benefit from leaf litter utilization in the pitcher plant Nepenthes ampullaria. Plant, Cell & Environment 34, 1865-1873.  http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1365-3040.2011.02382.x

Chin L, Moran JA and Clarke C (2010) Trap geometry in three giant montane pitcher plant species from Borneo is a function of tree shrew body size. New Phytologist 186, 461-470.  http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1469-8137.2009.03166.x

Moran JA, Hawkins BJ, Gowen BE and Robbins SL (2010) Ion fluxes across the pitcher walls of three Bornean Nepenthes pitcher plant species: flux rates and gland distribution patterns reflect nitrogen sequestration strategies. J. Exp. Bot. 61, 1365-1374.  http://jxb.oxfordjournals.org/cgi/content/abstract/61/5/1365

Scholz I, Buckins M, et al. (2010) Slippery surfaces of pitcher plants: Nepenthes wax crystals minimize insect attachment via microscopic surface roughness. J. Exp. Biol. 213, 1115-1125.  http://jeb.biologists.org/cgi/content/abstract/213/7/1115

Adlassnig W, Steinhauser G, Peroutka M, Musilek A, Sterba JH, Lichtscheidl IK and Bichler M (2009) Expanding the menu for carnivorous plants: Uptake of potassium, iron and manganese by carnivorous pitcher plants. Applied Radiation and Isotopes 67, 2117-2122.  http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0969804309003686

Gaume L and Di Giusto B (2009) Adaptive significance and ontogenetic variability of the waxy zone in Nepenthes rafflesiana. Ann. Bot. 104, 1281-1291.  http://aob.oxfordjournals.org/cgi/content/abstract/104/7/1281

Pavlovic A, Singerova L, Demko V and Hudak J (2009) Feeding enhances photosynthetic efficiency in the carnivorous pitcher plant Nepenthes talangensis. Ann. Bot. 104, 307-314.  http://aob.oxfordjournals.org/cgi/content/abstract/104/2/307

Wang L, Zhou Q, Zheng Y and Xu S (2009) Composite structure and properties of the pitcher surface of the carnivorous plant Nepenthes and its influence on the insect attachment system. Progress in Natural Science 19, 1657-1664.  http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1002007109002998

Osunkoya OO, Daud SD and Wimmer FL (2008) Longevity, Lignin Content and Construction Cost of the Assimilatory Organs of Nepenthes Species. Ann. Bot. 102, 845-853.  http://aob.oxfordjournals.org/cgi/content/abstract/102/5/845

Osunkoya OO, Daud SD, Di-Giusto B, Wimmer FL and Holige TM (2007) Construction Costs and Physico-chemical Properties of the Assimilatory Organs of Nepenthes Species in Northern Borneo. Ann. Bot. 99, 895-906.  http://aob.oxfordjournals.org/cgi/content/abstract/99/5/895

Pavlovic A, Masarovicova E and Hudak J (2007) Carnivorous Syndrome in Asian Pitcher Plants of the Genus Nepenthes. Ann. Bot. 100, 527-536.  http://aob.oxfordjournals.org/cgi/content/abstract/100/3/527

(2005) Volume 75 (2004). Fitoterapia 76, 134-141.  http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0367326X04002497

Ellison AM and Farnsworth EJ (2005) The cost of carnivory for Darlingtonia californica (Sarraceniaceae): evidence from relationships among leaf traits. Am. J. Botany 92, 1085-1093.  http://www.amjbot.org/cgi/content/abstract/92/7/1085

Gorb E, Haas K, Henrich A, Enders S, Barbakadze N and Gorb S (2005) Composite structure of the crystalline epicuticular wax layer of the slippery zone in the pitchers of the carnivorous plant Nepenthes alata and its effect on insect attachment. J. Exp. Biol. 208, 4651-4662.  http://jeb.biologists.org/cgi/content/abstract/208/24/4651

Terce-Laforgue T, Dubois F, Ferrario-Mery S, Pou de Crecenzo M-A, Sangwan R and Hirel B (2004) Glutamate Dehydrogenase of Tobacco Is Mainly Induced in the Cytosol of Phloem Companion Cells When Ammonia Is Provided Either Externally or Released during Photorespiration. Plant Physiology 136, 4308-4317.  http://www.plantphysiol.org/cgi/content/abstract/136/4/4308

Wiart C, Mogana S, Khalifah S, Mahan M, Ismail S, Buckle M, Narayana AK and Sulaiman M (2004) Antimicrobial screening of plants used for traditional medicine in the state of Perak, Peninsular Malaysia. Fitoterapia 75, 68-73.  http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0367326X03002089

Bert W, Tandingan De Ley I, Driessche Rv, Segers H and De Ley P (2003) Baujardia mirabilis gen. n., sp. n. from pitcher plants and its phylogenetic position within Panagrolaimidae (Nematoda: Rhabditida). Nematology : international journal of fundamental and applied nematological research., 3.

Dubois F, Tercé-Laforgue T, Gonzalez-Moro M-B, Estavillo J-M, Sangwan R, Gallais A and Hirel B (2003) Glutamate dehydrogenase in plants: is there a new story for an old enzyme? Plant Physiology and Biochemistry 41, 565-576.  http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0981942803000755

Ellison AM and Gotelli NJ (2001) Evolutionary ecology of carnivorous plants. Trends in Ecology & Evolution 16, 623-629.  http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0169534701022698

Merbach MA, Zizka G, Fiala B, Maschwitz U and Booth WE (2001) Patterns of nectar secretion in five Nepenthes species from Brunei Darussalam, Northwest Borneo, and implications for ant-plant relationships. Flora : Morphologie, Geobotanik, Oekophysiologie., 2.

Moran JA, Merbach MA, Livingston NJ, Clarke CM and Booth WE (2001) Termite Prey Specialization in the Pitcher Plant Nepenthes albomarginata—Evidence from Stable Isotope Analysis. Annals of Botany 88, 307-311.  http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S030573640191460X

Moran JA, Merbach MA, Livingston NJ, Clarke CM and Booth WE (2001) Termite Prey Specialization in the Pitcher Plant Nepenthes albomarginata—Evidence from Stable Isotope Analysis. Ann. Bot. 88, 307-311.  http://aob.oxfordjournals.org/cgi/content/abstract/88/2/307

Schulze W, Schulze ED, Schulze I and Oren R (2001) Quantification of insect nitrogen utilization by the venus fly trap Dionaea muscipula catching prey with highly variable isotope signatures. J. Exp. Bot. 52, 1041-1049.  http://jxb.oxfordjournals.org/cgi/content/abstract/52/358/1041

Baskin CC and Baskin JM (1998) Chapter 11 - Germination Ecology of Plants with Specialized Life Cycles and/or Habitats. In ‘Seeds’ (Ed.^(Eds  pp. 459-557. (Academic Press: San Diego). http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/B9780120802609500117

Schulze W, Schulze ED, Pate JS and Gillison AN (1997) The nitrogen supply from soils and insects during growth of the pitcher plants Nepenthes mirabilis, Cephalotus follicularis and Darlingtonia californica. Oecologia., 4.

Shivas RG and Brown JF (1989) Yeasts associated with fluid in pitchers of Nepenthes. Mycological Research 93, 96-100.  http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0953756289801431

Hartley RD and Harris PJ (1981) Phenolic Constituents of the cell walls of dicotyledons. Biochemical Systematics and Ecology 9, 189-203.  http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/0305197881900405

Adlassnig W, Peroutka M and Lendl T Traps of carnivorous pitcher plants as a habitat: composition of the fluid, biodiversity and mutualistic activities. Ann. Bot. 107, 181-194.  http://aob.oxfordjournals.org/cgi/content/abstract/107/2/181

Arsova B, Kierszniowska S and Schulze WX The use of heavy nitrogen in quantitative proteomics experiments in plants. Trends in Plant Science 17, 102-112.  http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1360138511002330

MithÖfer A Carnivorous pitcher plants: Insights in an old topic. Phytochemistry 72, 1678-1682.  http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0031942210004450

Mogi M Unusual Life History Traits of Aedes (Stegomyia) Mosquitoes (Diptera: Culicidae) Inhabiting Nepenthes Pitchers. Annals of the Entomological Society of America., 4.  http://dx.doi.org/10.1603/AN10028

Moran JA, Hawkins BJ, Gowen BE and Robbins SL Ion fluxes across the pitcher walls of three Bornean Nepenthes pitcher plant species: flux rates and gland distribution patterns reflect nitrogen sequestration strategies. J. Exp. Bot. 61, 1365-1374.  http://jxb.oxfordjournals.org/cgi/content/abstract/61/5/1365

Scholz I, Buckins M, et al. Slippery surfaces of pitcher plants: Nepenthes wax crystals minimize insect attachment via microscopic surface roughness. J. Exp. Biol. 213, 1115-1125.  http://jeb.biologists.org/cgi/content/abstract/213/7/1115

 


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Grateful acknowledgment is made to the following: for plant names: Australian Plant Name Index, Australian National Herbarium http://www.anbg.gov.au/cpbr/databases/apni-search-full.html; ; The International Plant Names Index, Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew/Harvard University Herbaria/Australian National Herbarium http://www.ipni.org/index.html; Plants Database, United States Department of Agriculture, National Resources Conservation Service http://plants.usda.gov/;DJ Mabberley (1997) The Plant Book, Cambridge University Press (Second Edition); JH Wiersma and B Leon (1999) World Economic Plants, CRC Press; RJ Hnatiuk (1990) Census of Australian Vascular Plants, Australian Government Publishing Service; for information: Science Direct http://www.sciencedirect.com/; Wiley Online Library http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/advanced/search; High Wire http://highwire.stanford.edu/cgi/search; Oxford Journals http://services.oxfordjournals.org/search.dtl; USDA National Agricultural Library http://agricola.nal.usda.gov/booleancube/booleancube_search_cit.html; for synonyms: The Plant List http://www.theplantlist.org/; for common names: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page; etc.


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