Australian New Crops Info 2016
Supported by the Rural Industries Research and Development Corporation

Listing of Interesting Plants of the World:

Nephroma helveticum

 

 

This species name was not found in The Plant List

 

This species has no synonyms in The Plant List

 

Common names:

Sipe's Kidney Lichen, Swiss Kidney Lichen

 

 

Trends (five databases) 1901-2013:
[Number of papers mentioning Nephroma helveticum: 19]

 

 

Popularity of Nephroma helveticum over time
[Left-hand Plot: Plot of numbers of papers mentioning Nephroma helveticum (histogram and left hand axis scale of left-hand plot) and line of best fit, 1901 to 2013 (equation and % variation accounted for in box); Right-hand Plot: Plot of a proportional micro index, derived from numbers of papers mentioning Nephroma helveticum as a proportion (scaled by multiplying by one million) of the approximate total number of papers available in databases for that year (frequency polygon and left-hand axis scale of right-hand plot) and line of best fit, 1901 to 2013 (equation and % variation accounted for in box)] 

[For larger charts showing the numbers of papers that have mentioned this species over years, select this link; there are links to come back from there]

 

Keywords

[Total number of keywords included in the papers that mentioned this species: 137]

 

boreal forests (4), epiphytes (4), Lichen (4), Lichen substances (4), Cyanobacteria (3), Lichen-forming fungi (3), litterfall (3), Mountain forests (3), Nostoc (3), Taiga (3), Canopy openness (2), Chlorophyll fluorescence (2), Community structure (2), Cyanolichens (2), Diversity (2), Epiphytic lichen (2), Evergreen broad-leaved forest (2), Heavy metal tolerance (2), Middle-aged oak secondary forest (MOSF) (2), Nephroma (2), Partial-cut harvesting (2), symbiosis (2), Abies sibirica (1), Air pollution (1), Air quality (1), biodegradation (1), biogeochemical cycles (1), British Columbia (1), Butterfly (1), Canonical correspondence analysis (CCA) (1), Canopy lichens (1), Chlorophycota (1), Climate change (1), Coarse woody debris (1), Coccomyxa (1), Decay class (1), Dictyochloropsis (1), Divergence date (1), Dry matter gain (1), Energy conversion efficiency (1), Even-aged stands (1), Extinction (1), Forest health monitoring' (1), Fumarprotocetraric acid (1), Functional group (1), functional guild (1), fungal anatomy (1), Green algae (1), Indicator species analysis (ISA) (1), Inland temperate rainforest (1), Inland-rainforest (1), Insect (1), Internet resource (1), Intrathalline cation transfer (1), Irradiance (1), ITS (1), Leptogium saturninum (1), lichenized fungi (1), lichens (1), Light (1), Light taiga (1), Liverwort (1), Lobaria pulmonaria (1), long-distance dispersal (1), Macaronesia (1), Manganese (1), Meadow steppe (1), Moss (1), Nephroma helveticum (1), nitrogen (1), nitrogen content (1), Old-growth (1), Old-growth lichens (1), Old-growth stands (1), Photoprotection (1), phylogeny (1), phylogeography (1), Picea obovata (1), Pinus sibirica (1), Predictive ecosystem mapping (1), radiation (1), Relative soil moisture (1), Scotland (1), speciation (1), Species composition (1), species differences (1), SSU rDNA (1), Sub-boreal spruce forest (1), Substratum (1), Succession (1), Sulphur dioxide (1), symbionts (1), temperate forests (1), Thuja plicata (1), Transient species (1), Trebouxia (1), Ulmus pumila open woodland (1), Variable retention harvesting (1), Water availability (1), Water relations (1), western North America (1)

 

[If all keywords are not here (as indicated by .....), they can be accessed from this link; there are links to come back from there]

 

 

Most likely scope for crop use/product (%):
[Please note: When there are only a few papers mentioning a species, care should be taken with the interpretation of these crop use/product results; as well, a mention may relate to the use of a species, or the context in which it grows, rather than a product]

 

ornamental (60.06), shade (26.72), medicinal (1.82), timber (1.39), fruit (1.33), weed (1.00), starch (0.60), cereal (0.42), nutraceutical (0.42), grain legume (0.42)…..

 

[To see the full list of crop use/product outcomes, from searching abstracts of the papers that have mentioned this species, select this link; details of the analysis process have also been included; there are links to come back from there]

 

 

Recent mentions of this species in the literature:
[since 2012, with links to abstracts; The references from 1901-2013 which have been used for the trend, keyword and crop use/product analyses below, are listed below these references]

 

Asplund J and Wardle DA (2016) How lichens impact on terrestrial community and ecosystem properties. Biological Reviews, n/a-n/a. http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/brv.12305

Bidussi M and Gauslaa Y (2015) Relative growth rates and secondary compounds in epiphytic lichens along canopy height gradients in forest gaps and meadows in inland British Columbia. Botany. 93, 123-131. http://dx.doi.org/10.1139/cjb-2014-0214

Kobylinski A and Fredeen AL (2014) Vertical distribution and nitrogen content of epiphytic macrolichen functional groups in sub-boreal forests of central British Columbia. Forest Ecology and Management 329, 118-128. //www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0378112714003806

Campbell J, Bengtson P, Fredeen AL, Coxson DS and Prescott CE (2013) Does exogenous carbon extend the realized niche of canopy lichens? Evidence from sub-boreal forests in British Columbia. Ecology 94, 1186-1195. http://dx.doi.org/10.1890/12-1857.1

Kaminsky B, Rosentreter R and DeBolt A (2013) Ecology and Distribution of Coccocarpia filiformis and Other New and Uncommon Florida Lichens. Evansia. 30, 79-89. http://dx.doi.org/10.1639%2F079.030.0302

Li S, Liu W-Y and Li D-W (2013) Bole epiphytic lichens as potential indicators of environmental change in subtropical forest ecosystems in southwest China. Ecological Indicators 29, 93-104. //www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1470160X12004232

McMullin RT, Thompson ID and Newmaster SG (2013) Lichen Conservation in Heavily Managed Boreal Forests. Conservation Biology 27, 1020-1030. http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/cobi.12094

Fedrowitz K, Kaasalainen U and Rikkinen J (2012) Geographic mosaic of symbiont selectivity in a genus of epiphytic cyanolichens. Ecology and Evolution 2, 2291-2303. http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ece3.343

 

 

References 1901-2013 (and links to abstracts):
[Number of papers mentioning Nephroma helveticum: 19; Any undated papers have been included at the end]

 

Fedrowitz K, Kaasalainen U and Rikkinen J (2012) Geographic mosaic of symbiont selectivity in a genus of epiphytic cyanolichens. Ecology and Evolution 2, 2291-2303.  http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ece3.343

Hauck M (2011) Site factors controlling epiphytic lichen abundance in northern coniferous forests. Flora - Morphology, Distribution, Functional Ecology of Plants 206, 81-90.  http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0367253010001076

Li S, Liu W, Wang L, Ma W and Song L (2011) Biomass, diversity and composition of epiphytic macrolichens in primary and secondary forests in the subtropical Ailao Mountains, SW China. Forest Ecology and Management 261, 1760-1770.  http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0378112711000697

Markus H (2011) Site factors controlling epiphytic lichen abundance in northern coniferous forests. Flora - Morphology, Distribution, Functional Ecology of Plants 206, 81-90.  http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0367253010001076

Sérusiaux E, Villarreal A JC, Wheeler T and Goffinet B (2011) Recent origin, active speciation and dispersal for the lichen genus Nephroma (Peltigerales) in Macaronesia. Journal of Biogeography 38, 1138-1151.  http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1365-2699.2010.02469.x

Botting RS and DeLong C (2009) Macrolichen and bryophyte responses to coarse woody debris characteristics in sub-boreal spruce forest. Forest Ecology and Management 258, Supplement, S85-S94.  http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0378112709006136

Hauck M and Javkhlan S (2009) Epiphytic lichen diversity and its dependence on bark chemistry in the northern Mongolian dark taiga. Flora - Morphology, Distribution, Functional Ecology of Plants 204, 278-288.  http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0367253008001242

Radies D, Coxson D, Johnson C and Konwicki K (2009) Predicting canopy macrolichen diversity and abundance within old-growth inland temperate rainforests. Forest Ecology and Management 259, 86-97.  http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0378112709007063

Markus H (2008) Susceptibility to acidic precipitation contributes to the decline of the terricolous lichens Cetraria aculeata and Cetraria islandica in central Europe. Environmental Pollution 152, 731-735.  http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0269749107003247

Coxson DS and Stevenson SK (2007) Growth rate responses of Lobaria pulmonaria to canopy structure in even-aged and old-growth cedar–hemlock forests of central-interior British Columbia, Canada. Forest Ecology and Management 242, 5-16.  http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0378112707000527

Geiser LH and Neitlich PN (2007) Air pollution and climate gradients in western Oregon and Washington indicated by epiphytic macrolichens. Environmental Pollution 145, 203-218.  http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0269749106002120

Hauck M, Dulamsuren C and Mühlenberg M (2007) Lichen diversity on steppe slopes in the northern Mongolian mountain taiga and its dependence on microclimate. Flora - Morphology, Distribution, Functional Ecology of Plants 202, 530-546.  http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0367253007000746

Hauck M, Paul A and Spribille T (2006) Uptake and toxicity of manganese in epiphytic cyanolichens. Environmental and Experimental Botany 56, 216-224.  http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0098847205000341

Paul A and Hauck M (2006) Effects of manganese on chlorophyll fluorescence in epiphytic cyano- and chlorolichens. Flora - Morphology, Distribution, Functional Ecology of Plants 201, 451-460.  http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0367253006000302

Coxson DS and Stevenson SK (2005) Retention of canopy lichens after partial-cut harvesting in wet-belt interior cedar–hemlock forests, British Columbia, Canada. Forest Ecology and Management 204, 99-114.  http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0378112704006504

Philip S (2005) Estimating local extinction rates over successive time-frames. Biological Conservation 121, 281-287.  http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0006320704002010

Lohtander K, Oksanen I and Rikkinen J (2003) Genetic diversity of green algal and cyanobacterial photobionts in Nephroma (Peltigerales). The Lichenologist 35, 325-339.  http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0024282903000513

Taton A, Grubisic S, Brambilla E, De Wit R and Wilmotte A (2003) Cyanobacterial Diversity in Natural and Artificial Microbial Mats of Lake Fryxell (McMurdo Dry Valleys, Antarctica): a Morphological and Molecular Approach. Appl. Envir. Microbiol. 69, 5157-5169.  http://aem.asm.org/cgi/content/abstract/69/9/5157

Lohtander K, Oksanen I and Rikkinen J (2002) A phylogenetic study of Nephroma (lichen-forming Ascomycota). Mycological Research 106, 777-787.  http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0953756208601161

Campbell J, Fredeen AL and Prescott CE Decomposition and nutrient release from four epiphytic lichen litters in sub-boreal spruce forests. Canadian journal of forest research. 40, 1473-1484.  http://dx.doi.org/10.1139/X10-071

Hauck M Site factors controlling epiphytic lichen abundance in northern coniferous forests. Flora - Morphology, Distribution, Functional Ecology of Plants 206, 81-90.  http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0367253010001076

Li S, Liu W, Wang L, Ma W and Song L Biomass, diversity and composition of epiphytic macrolichens in primary and secondary forests in the subtropical Ailao Mountains, SW China. Forest Ecology and Management 261, 1760-1770.  http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0378112711000697

Li S, Liu W-Y and Li D-W Bole epiphytic lichens as potential indicators of environmental change in subtropical forest ecosystems in southwest China. Ecological Indicators 29, 93-104.  http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1470160X12004232

 


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Grateful acknowledgment is made to the following: for plant names: Australian Plant Name Index, Australian National Herbarium http://www.anbg.gov.au/cpbr/databases/apni-search-full.html; ; The International Plant Names Index, Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew/Harvard University Herbaria/Australian National Herbarium http://www.ipni.org/index.html; Plants Database, United States Department of Agriculture, National Resources Conservation Service http://plants.usda.gov/;DJ Mabberley (1997) The Plant Book, Cambridge University Press (Second Edition); JH Wiersma and B Leon (1999) World Economic Plants, CRC Press; RJ Hnatiuk (1990) Census of Australian Vascular Plants, Australian Government Publishing Service; for information: Science Direct http://www.sciencedirect.com/; Wiley Online Library http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/advanced/search; High Wire http://highwire.stanford.edu/cgi/search; Oxford Journals http://services.oxfordjournals.org/search.dtl; USDA National Agricultural Library http://agricola.nal.usda.gov/booleancube/booleancube_search_cit.html; for synonyms: The Plant List http://www.theplantlist.org/; for common names: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page; etc.


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Latest update March 2017 by: ANCW