Australian New Crops Info 2016
Supported by the Rural Industries Research and Development Corporation

Listing of Interesting Plants of the World:

Nerine sarniensis

 

 

This species is usually known as:

Nerine sarniensis

 

This species has also been known as:

Nerine sarniensis var. corusca, Nerine sarniensis var. curvifolia, Nerine sarniensis f. curvifolia, Nerine sarniensis f. fothergilii, Nerine sarniensis var. moorei, Nerine sarniensis var. plantii, Nerine sarniensis var. profusa, Nerine sarniensis var. rosea, Nerine sarniensis var. venusta

 

Common names:

Guernsey Lily, Jersey Lily

 

 

Trends (five databases) 1901-2013:
[Number of papers mentioning Nerine sarniensis: 29]

 

 

Popularity of Nerine sarniensis over time
[Left-hand Plot: Plot of numbers of papers mentioning Nerine sarniensis (histogram and left hand axis scale of left-hand plot) and line of best fit, 1901 to 2013 (equation and % variation accounted for in box); Right-hand Plot: Plot of a proportional micro index, derived from numbers of papers mentioning Nerine sarniensis as a proportion (scaled by multiplying by one million) of the approximate total number of papers available in databases for that year (frequency polygon and left-hand axis scale of right-hand plot) and line of best fit, 1901 to 2013 (equation and % variation accounted for in box)] 

[For larger charts showing the numbers of papers that have mentioned this species over years, select this link; there are links to come back from there]

 

Keywords

[Total number of keywords included in the papers that mentioned this species: 140]

 

2,4-D (1), Nerine (6), sucrose (5), nerine sarniensis (4), cut flowers (3), Cycloheximide (3), buds (2), Commercialization (2), Consolida ajacis (2), Crop development (2), Foliages (2), In vitro culture (2), inflorescences (2), Postharvest (2), Potted flowers (2), Soluble proteins (2), South African flora (2), Vase life (2), Wet storage (2), Acclimatization (1), Activated charcoal (1), Aeropetes tulbaghia (1), Androgenesis (1), benzyladenine (1), bulb development (1), Cape flora (1), cell membranes (1), cloning (1), Corm induction (1), cultivars (1), culture media (1), Cut flower (1), cut flower preservatives (1), developmental stages (1), dichelostemma multiflorum (1), DNA (1), dose response (1), duration (1), eucrosia radiata (1), explants (1), floriculture crops (1), Gelation (1), genome (1), Gibberella fujikuroi (1), Gladiolus (1), gladiolus grandiflorus (1), Growth regulators (1), haemanthus coccineus (1), Hardening-off (1), Hippeastrum (1), Hyacinthus orientalis (1), hybridization (1), identification (1), incubation (1), indole acetic acid (1), indole butyric acid (1), Kelpak (1), kinetin (1), Liquid medium (1), membrane permeability (1), Micropropagation (1), naphthaleneacetic acid (1), Narcissus (1), Narcissus tazetta (1), Nemestrinidae (1), nerine fothergilli (1), Nerine virus X (1), nerine virus y (1), nerine yellow stripe virus (1), Netherlands (1), ornamental bulbs (1), ornithogalum dubium (1), Paclobutrazol (1), Petal senescence (1), phenolic compounds (1), plant anatomy (1), plant development (1), plant morphology (1), plant propagation (1), plant proteins (1), plant viruses (1), plasmids (1), Pollinator shift (1), Postharvest performance (1), postharvest physiology (1), postharvest treatment (1), probes (equipment) (1), product quality (1), Prosoeca (1), Protea (1), protein content (1), Protoplast culture (1), purification (1), rapid methods (1), regenerative ability (1), Somatic embryos (1), South Africa (1), species (1), Spectral reflectance (1), storage conditions (1), storage temperature (1), storage time (1), sugar content (1), Sugars (1), Synthetic seeds (1), temperature (1), tillage (1), vase solutions (1), vectors (1), yields (1), Zantedeschia aethiopica (1)

 

[If all keywords are not here (as indicated by .....), they can be accessed from this link; there are links to come back from there]

 

 

Most likely scope for crop use/product (%):
[Please note: When there are only a few papers mentioning a species, care should be taken with the interpretation of these crop use/product results; as well, a mention may relate to the use of a species, or the context in which it grows, rather than a product]

 

cut flower (79.81), sweetener (6.94), starch (5.95), charcoal (3.02), model (2.00), medicinal (0.32), timber (0.30), fruit (0.24), poison (0.13), weed (0.08)…..

 

[To see the full list of crop use/product outcomes, from searching abstracts of the papers that have mentioned this species, select this link; details of the analysis process have also been included; there are links to come back from there]

 

 

Recent mentions of this species in the literature:
[since 2012, with links to abstracts; The references from 1901-2013 which have been used for the trend, keyword and crop use/product analyses below, are listed below these references]

 

(2017) Graphical Abstract contents list. Fitoterapia 116, e1-e7. //www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0367326X16309832

Coates R (2017) Nigel of Canterburys Surname(s) and a Specious Link with Guernsey. Notes and Queries, gjw234. http://nq.oxfordjournals.org

Masi M, van der Westhuyzen AE, et al. (2017) Sarniensine, a mesembrine-type alkaloid isolated from Nerine sarniensis, an indigenous South African Amaryllidaceae, with larvicidal and adulticidal activities against Aedes aegypti. Fitoterapia 116, 34-38. //www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0367326X16305664

Cohen M, Kamenetsky R and Yom Din G (2016) Herbaceous peony in warm climate: Modelling stem elongation and growers profit responses to dormancy conditions. Information Processing in Agriculture 3, 175-182. //www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S2214317315300214

(2015) Book Reviews. Curtis’s Botanical Magazine 32, 162-177. http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/curt.12109

(2015) CURTIS’S BOTANICAL MAGAZINE: Index to Volume 32 of this series or Volume 216 of the whole work. Curtis’s Botanical Magazine 32, 388-391. http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/curt.12121

Baskin CC and Baskin JM (2014) Chapter 10 - A Geographical Perspective on Germination Ecology: Temperate and Arctic Zones. In ‘Seeds (Second Edition)’ (Ed.^(Eds  pp. 591-867. (Academic Press: San Diego). //www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/B978012416677600010X

Erel R, Ben-Gal A, Dag A, Schwartz A and Yermiyahu U (2014) Sodium replacement of potassium in physiological processes of olive trees (var. Barnea) as affected by drought. Tree Physiol 34, 1102-1117. http://treephys.oxfordjournals.org/cgi/content/abstract/34/10/1102

Gul F, Tahir I and Shahri W (2014) Improvement in postharvest performance of cut scapes of Nerine sarniensis red by the application of growth regulators. International journal of postharvest technology and innovation. 4, 103-113. http://dx.doi.org/10.1504%2FIJPTI.2014.068705

Johnson SD, Newman E and Anderson B (2012) Preliminary observations of insect pollination in Protea punctata (Proteaceae). South African Journal of Botany 83, 63-67. //www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0254629912000919

 

 

References 1901-2013 (and links to abstracts):
[Number of papers mentioning Nerine sarniensis: 29; Any undated papers have been included at the end]

 

(2011) CURTIS’S BOTANICAL MAGAZINE: Index to Volume 28 of this Series or Volume 212 of the Whole Work. Curtis’s Botanical Magazine 28, 374-377.  http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1467-8748.2011.01764.x

Bennett MD and Leitch IJ (2011) Nuclear DNA amounts in angiosperms: targets, trends and tomorrow. Ann. Bot. 107, 467-590.  http://aob.oxfordjournals.org/cgi/content/abstract/107/3/467

Reinten EY, Coetzee JH and van Wyk BE (2011) The potential of South African indigenous plants for the international cut flower trade. South African Journal of Botany 77, 934-946.  http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0254629911001244

Shahri W and Tahir I (2011) An effective storage protocol for improving the postharvest performance in cut spikes of Consolida ajacis Nieuwl cv. Violet blue. Scientia Horticulturae 129, 154-158.  http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0304423811001166

Whitney HM, Bennett KMV, Dorling M, Sandbach L, Prince D, Chittka L and Glover BJ (2011) Why do so many petals have conical epidermal cells? Ann. Bot. 108, 609-616.  http://aob.oxfordjournals.org/cgi/content/abstract/108/4/609

Whitney HM, Glover BJ, Walker R and Ellis AG (2011) THE CONTRIBUTION OF EPIDERMAL STRUCTURE TO FLOWER COLOUR IN THE SOUTH AFRICAN FLORA. Curtis’s Botanical Magazine 28, 349-371.  http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1467-8748.2011.01762.x

Johnson SD (2010) The pollination niche and its role in the diversification and maintenance of the southern African flora. Phil Trans R Soc B 365, 499-516.  http://rstb.royalsocietypublishing.org/cgi/content/abstract/365/1539/499

Khodorova NV, Miroslavov EA, Shavarda AL, Laberche J-C and Boitel-Conti M (2010) Bud development in corydalis (Corydalis bracteata) requires low temperature: a study of developmental and carbohydrate changes. Ann. Bot. 105, 891-903.  http://aob.oxfordjournals.org/cgi/content/abstract/105/6/891

Tooke F and Battey NH (2010) Temperate flowering phenology. J. Exp. Bot. 61, 2853-2862.  http://jxb.oxfordjournals.org/cgi/content/abstract/61/11/2853

Duncan G (2009) 648. NERINE HUMILIS. Curtis’s Botanical Magazine 26, 200-209.  http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1467-8748.2009.01650.x

Gul F and Tahir I (2009) Effect of cool and wet storage on postharvest performane of Nerine sarniensis cv. red scapes. Acta horticulturae. 847, 847.

Madubanya LA, Makunga NP and Fennell CW (2006) Dierama luteoalbidum: Liquid culture provides an efficient system for the ex situ conservation of an endangered and horticulturally valuable plant. South African Journal of Botany 72, 584-588.  http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0254629906000858

Mohsen K.H E (2004) Comparison, determination and optimizing the conditions required for rhizome and shoot formation, and flowering of in vitro cultured calla explants. Scientia Horticulturae 101, 305-313.  http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0304423803002000

Vishnevetsky J, Zamski E and Ziv M (2003) Enhanced bud and bulblet regeneration from bulbs of Nerine sarniensis cultured in vitro. Plant Cell Rep 21, 645-50.

Ziv M and Lilien-Kipnis H (2000) Bud regeneration from inflorescence explants for rapid propagation of geophytes in vitro. Plant cell reports. 19, 845-850.

AbouHaidar MG and Gellatly D (1999) POTEXVIRUSES. In ‘Encyclopedia of Virology (Second Edition)’ (Ed.^(Eds Editors-in-Chief:   Allan G and Robert GW) pp. 1364-1368. (Elsevier: Oxford). http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/B0122270304000017

Vishnevetsky J (1997) Development of the bulb and inflorescence in outdoor grown Nerine sarniensis. Acta horticulturae. 430, 430.

Theron KI and Jacobs G (1996) Changes in Carbohydrate Composition of the Different Bulb Components of Nerine bowdenii W. Watson (Amaryllidaceae). J. Amer. Soc. Hort. Sci. 121, 343-346.  http://journal.ashspublications.org/cgi/content/abstract/121/2/343

Theron KI and Jacobs G (1994) Periodicity of Inflorescence Initiation and Development in Nerine bowdenii W. Watson (Amaryllidaceae). J. Amer. Soc. Hort. Sci. 119, 1121-1126.  http://journal.ashspublications.org/cgi/content/abstract/119/6/1121

Balasingam G, Ellison N, Milne KS and Forster RLS (1988) Sensitive and specific detection of two filamentous viruses from Nerines using cloned cDNA probes. Acta horticulturae. 234, 234.

Woltering EJ and Van Doorn WG (1988) Role of Ethylene in Senescence of Petals—Morphological and Taxonomical Relationships. J. Exp. Bot. 39, 1605-1616.  http://jxb.oxfordjournals.org/cgi/content/abstract/39/11/1605

Hanks GR (1986) The effect of temperature and duration of incubation on twin-scale propagation of Narcissus and other bulbs. Crop research., 2.

Duncan G (1984) Nerine sarniensis “Kirstenbosch White”—the white sport. Veld & flora. 70, 55.

Muller PJ and Conijn CGM (1984) Prochloraz, a new substance for controlling bulb rot in Nerine , Prochloraz, nieuw middeltegen bolrot in Nerine. Vakblad voor de bloemisterij. 39, 43.

August DH (1974) Principles for forcing tulips, hyacinths, daffodils, Easter lilies and Dutch irises. Scientia Horticulturae 2, 313-355.  http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/0304423874900417

Clarke E (1965) Book Reviews. J Hist Med Allied Sci XX, 295-296.  http://jhmas.oxfordjournals.org

Isaac WE and McGillivray G (1965) A Note on the Water-Storing Seeds of Two Species of Crinum and of Some Other South African Amaryllidaceae (sub-family Amaryllidoidease). Ann. Bot. 29, 739-740.  http://aob.oxfordjournals.org

RUSSELL KF (1965) Book Reviews. J Hist Med Allied Sci XX, 294-295.  http://jhmas.oxfordjournals.org

W.C W (1965) Chapter 9 Alkaloids of the Amaryllidaceae. In ‘The Alkaloids: Chemistry and Physiology’ (Ed.^(Eds Manske RHF) pp. 289-413. (Academic Press). http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1876081308601785

Bede C (1873) HEATHER FOLK-LORE. Notes and Queries s4-XII, 325-d-.  http://nq.oxfordjournals.org

Boreas (1873) PROVINCIALISMS. Notes and Queries s4-XII, 325-f-.  http://nq.oxfordjournals.org

Campkin H (1873) UNUSUAL BAPTISMAL NAME: LONG SERVICES IN THE SAME FAMILY. Notes and Queries s4-XII, 325-e-.  http://nq.oxfordjournals.org

Cornelius J (1873) GUERNSEY LILIES. Notes and Queries s4-XII, 325-b-.  http://nq.oxfordjournals.org

G M (1873) CASPER HANSER. Notes and Queries s4-XII, 325-g-326.  http://nq.oxfordjournals.org

G. M. (1873) CASPER HANSER. Notes and Queries s4-XII, 325-g-326.  http://nq.oxfordjournals.org

Mayhew AL (1873) “BLOODY.”. Notes and Queries s4-XII, 324-b-325.  http://nq.oxfordjournals.org

S. T P (1873) CELTIC NATIONALITY. Notes and Queries s4-XII, 325-a-.  http://nq.oxfordjournals.org

S. T. P. (1873) CELTIC NATIONALITY. Notes and Queries s4-XII, 325-a-.  http://nq.oxfordjournals.org

Y. S M (1873) GUERNSEY LILIES. Notes and Queries s4-XII, 325-c-.  http://nq.oxfordjournals.org

Y. S. M. (1873) GUERNSEY LILIES. Notes and Queries s4-XII, 325-c-.  http://nq.oxfordjournals.org

Bennett MD and Leitch IJ Nuclear DNA amounts in angiosperms: targets, trends and tomorrow. Ann. Bot. 107, 467-590.  http://aob.oxfordjournals.org/cgi/content/abstract/107/3/467

Gul F and Tahir I An effective protocol for improving vaselife and postharvest performance of cut Narcissus tazetta flowers. Journal of the Saudi Society of Agricultural Sciences.  http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1658077X12000148

Johnson SD The pollination niche and its role in the diversification and maintenance of the southern African flora. Phil Trans R Soc B 365, 499-516.  http://rstb.royalsocietypublishing.org/cgi/content/abstract/365/1539/499

Johnson SD, Newman E and Anderson B Preliminary observations of insect pollination in Protea punctata (Proteaceae). South African Journal of Botany 83, 63-67.  http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0254629912000919

Khodorova NV, Miroslavov EA, Shavarda AL, Laberche J-C and Boitel-Conti M Bud development in corydalis (Corydalis bracteata) requires low temperature: a study of developmental and carbohydrate changes. Ann. Bot. 105, 891-903.  http://aob.oxfordjournals.org/cgi/content/abstract/105/6/891

Reinten EY, Coetzee JH and van Wyk BE The potential of South African indigenous plants for the international cut flower trade. South African Journal of Botany 77, 934-946.  http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0254629911001244

Shahri W and Tahir I An effective storage protocol for improving the postharvest performance in cut spikes of Consolida ajacis Nieuwl cv. Violet blue. Scientia Horticulturae 129, 154-158.  http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0304423811001166

T. Dennis T The role of activated charcoal in plant tissue culture. Biotechnology Advances 26, 618-631.  http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0734975008000864

Tooke F and Battey NH Temperate flowering phenology. J. Exp. Bot. 61, 2853-2862.  http://jxb.oxfordjournals.org/cgi/content/abstract/61/11/2853

Whitney HM, Bennett KMV, Dorling M, Sandbach L, Prince D, Chittka L and Glover BJ Why do so many petals have conical epidermal cells? Ann. Bot. 108, 609-616.  http://aob.oxfordjournals.org/cgi/content/abstract/108/4/609

 


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Grateful acknowledgment is made to the following: for plant names: Australian Plant Name Index, Australian National Herbarium http://www.anbg.gov.au/cpbr/databases/apni-search-full.html; ; The International Plant Names Index, Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew/Harvard University Herbaria/Australian National Herbarium http://www.ipni.org/index.html; Plants Database, United States Department of Agriculture, National Resources Conservation Service http://plants.usda.gov/;DJ Mabberley (1997) The Plant Book, Cambridge University Press (Second Edition); JH Wiersma and B Leon (1999) World Economic Plants, CRC Press; RJ Hnatiuk (1990) Census of Australian Vascular Plants, Australian Government Publishing Service; for information: Science Direct http://www.sciencedirect.com/; Wiley Online Library http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/advanced/search; High Wire http://highwire.stanford.edu/cgi/search; Oxford Journals http://services.oxfordjournals.org/search.dtl; USDA National Agricultural Library http://agricola.nal.usda.gov/booleancube/booleancube_search_cit.html; for synonyms: The Plant List http://www.theplantlist.org/; for common names: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page; etc.


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