Australian New Crops Info 2016
Supported by the Rural Industries Research and Development Corporation

Listing of Interesting Plants of the World:

Nertera granadensis

 

 

This species is usually known as:

Nertera granadensis, Nertera granadensis var. tetrasperma

 

This species has also been known as:

Nertera granadensis var. granadensis, Nertera granadensis var. insularis

 

Common names:

Coral Bead Plant, Pin-Cushion Plant, Coral Moss, English Baby Tears

 

 

Trends (five databases) 1901-2013:
[Number of papers mentioning Nertera granadensis: 13]

 

 

Popularity of Nertera granadensis over time
[Left-hand Plot: Plot of numbers of papers mentioning Nertera granadensis (histogram and left hand axis scale of left-hand plot) and line of best fit, 1901 to 2013 (equation and % variation accounted for in box); Right-hand Plot: Plot of a proportional micro index, derived from numbers of papers mentioning Nertera granadensis as a proportion (scaled by multiplying by one million) of the approximate total number of papers available in databases for that year (frequency polygon and left-hand axis scale of right-hand plot) and line of best fit, 1901 to 2013 (equation and % variation accounted for in box)] 

[For larger charts showing the numbers of papers that have mentioned this species over years, select this link; there are links to come back from there]

 

Keywords

[Total number of keywords included in the papers that mentioned this species: 58]

 

Lizards (3), Aminopeptidase-N (2), Antillanca (2), Butachauques (2), Canopy openness (2), Chiloe (2), Disacharidases (2), Hornopiren (2), seed dispersal (2), Stable isotopes (2), Talcan (2), Valdivian forest (2), Alpine habitats (1), Andes (1), climbing plants (1), Conservation biology (1), Cool–temperate (1), forest understorey (1), frugivory (1), germination patterns (1), Habitat islands (1), Holocene (1), Late glacial (1), Lianas (1), light availability (1), Páramo (1), Phytogeography (1), pioneer species (1), Rainforests (1), Rubiaceae (1), Rubioideae (1), Seed coat (1), Seed deposition (1), Seed germination (1), seed ingestion (1), sMolecular data (1), Southern Chile (1), Species distribution (1), treefall gaps (1), Trellis size (1), Tropical alpine (1), Trunk diameter (1), Vines (1), Warm–dry (1), Westerlies (1)

 

[If all keywords are not here (as indicated by .....), they can be accessed from this link; there are links to come back from there]

 

 

Most likely scope for crop use/product (%):
[Please note: When there are only a few papers mentioning a species, care should be taken with the interpretation of these crop use/product results; as well, a mention may relate to the use of a species, or the context in which it grows, rather than a product]

 

nutraceutical (26.86), fruit (18.31), beverage (14.96), shade (7.45), green manure (5.62), poison (3.27), medicinal (2.54), weed (2.48), ornamental (2.09), starch (1.49)…..

 

[To see the full list of crop use/product outcomes, from searching abstracts of the papers that have mentioned this species, select this link; details of the analysis process have also been included; there are links to come back from there]

 

 

Recent mentions of this species in the literature:
[since 2012, with links to abstracts; The references from 1901-2013 which have been used for the trend, keyword and crop use/product analyses below, are listed below these references]

 

Bravo K, Alzate F and Osorio E (2016) Fruits of selected wild and cultivated Andean plants as sources of potential compounds with antioxidant and anti-aging activity. Industrial Crops and Products 85, 341-352. //www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0926669015306658

Cantley JT, Markey AS, Swenson NG and Keeley SC (2016) Biogeography and evolutionary diversification in one of the most widely distributed and species rich genera of the Pacific. AoB Plants 8, plw043-. http://aobpla.oxfordjournals.org/cgi/content/abstract/8/0/plw043

Villaseñor JL (2016) Checklist of the native vascular plants of Mexico. Revista Mexicana de Biodiversidad 87, 559-902. //www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1870345316300707

Little C, Cuevas JG, Lara A, Pino M and Schoenholtz S (2015) Buffer effects of streamside native forests on water provision in watersheds dominated by exotic forest plantations. Ecohydrology 8, 1205-1217. http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/eco.1575

Baskin CC and Baskin JM (2014) Chapter 10 - A Geographical Perspective on Germination Ecology: Temperate and Arctic Zones. In ‘Seeds (Second Edition)’ (Ed.^(Eds  pp. 591-867. (Academic Press: San Diego). //www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/B978012416677600010X

Cantley JT, Swenson NG, Markey A and Keeley SC (2014) Biogeographic insights on Pacific Coprosma (Rubiaceae) indicate two colonizations to the Hawaiian Islands. Botanical Journal of the Linnean Society 174, 412-424. http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/boj.12130

Matson EC and Bart DJ (2014) Plant–community responses to shrub cover in a páramo grassland released from grazing and burning. Austral Ecology 39, 918-928. http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/aec.12157

Nylinder S, Cronholm B, de Lange PJ, Walsh N and Anderberg AA (2013) Species tree phylogeny and character evolution in the genus Centipeda (Asteraceae): Evidence from DNA sequences from coding and non-coding loci from the plastid and nuclear genomes. Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution 68, 239-250. //www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1055790313001292

Saslis-Lagoudakis CH, Savolainen V, Williamson EM, Forest F, Wagstaff SJ, Baral SR, Watson MF, Pendry CA and Hawkins JA (2012) Phylogenies reveal predictive power of traditional medicine in bioprospecting. PNAS 109, 15835-15840. http://www.pnas.org/cgi/content/abstract/109/39/15835

 

 

References 1901-2013 (and links to abstracts):
[Number of papers mentioning Nertera granadensis: 13; Any undated papers have been included at the end]

 

Saslis-Lagoudakis CH, Savolainen V, Williamson EM, Forest F, Wagstaff SJ, Baral SR, Watson MF, Pendry CA and Hawkins JA (2012) Phylogenies reveal predictive power of traditional medicine in bioprospecting. PNAS 109, 15835-15840.  http://www.pnas.org/cgi/content/abstract/109/39/15835

Gianoli E, Saldaña A, Jiménez-Castillo M and Valladares F (2010) Distribution and abundance of vines along the light gradient in a southern temperate rain forest. Journal of Vegetation Science 21, 66-73.  http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1654-1103.2009.01124.x

Vidal MA and Sabat P (2010) Stable isotopes document mainland–island divergence in resource use without concomitant physiological changes in the lizard Liolaemus pictus. Comparative Biochemistry and Physiology Part B: Biochemistry and Molecular Biology 156, 61-67.  http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1096495910000485

Carrasco-Urra F and Gianoli E (2009) Abundance of climbing plants in a southern temperate rain forest: host tree characteristics or light availability? Journal of Vegetation Science 20, 1155-1162.  http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1654-1103.2009.01115.x

Rydin C, Razafimandimbison SG and Bremer B (2008) Rare and enigmatic genera (Dunnia, Schizocolea, Colletoecema), sisters to species-rich clades: Phylogeny and aspects of conservation biology in the coffee family. Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution 48, 74-83.  http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S105579030800153X

Sklenář P and Balslev H (2005) Superpáramo plant species diversity and phytogeography in Ecuador. Flora - Morphology, Distribution, Functional Ecology of Plants 200, 416-433.  http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0367253005000654

Abarzúa AM, Villagrán C and Moreno PI (2004) Deglacial and postglacial climate history in east-central Isla Grande de Chiloé, southern Chile (43°S). Quaternary Research 62, 49-59.  http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0033589404000626

(2003) Chapter 13 Ice age Southern Andes. In ‘Developments in Quaternary Sciences’ (Ed.^(Eds Heusser CJ) pp. 174-187. (Elsevier). http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1571086603800167

(2003) Chapter 8 Vegetation. In ‘Developments in Quaternary Sciences’ (Ed.^(Eds Heusser CJ) pp. 44-73. (Elsevier). http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1571086603800118

Jansen S, Dessein S, Piesschaert F, Robbrecht E and Smets E (2000) Aluminium Accumulation in Leaves of Rubiaceae: Systematic and Phylogenetic Implications. Ann. Bot. 85, 91-101.  http://aob.oxfordjournals.org/cgi/content/abstract/85/1/91

Bremer B, Jansen RK, Oxelman B, Backlund M, Lantz H and Kim K-J (1999) More Characters or More Taxa for a Robust Phylogeny—Case Study from the Coffee Family (Rubiaceae). Syst Biol 48, 413-435.  http://sysbio.oxfordjournals.org/cgi/content/abstract/48/3/413

Anna T (1998) Effect of seed passage through vertebrate frugivores’ guts on germination: a review. Perspectives in Plant Ecology, Evolution and Systematics 1, 151-190.  http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1433831904700104

Parker T and Donoso C (1993) Natural regeneration of Fitzroya cupressoides in Chile and Argentina. Forest Ecology and Management 59, 63-85.  http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/037811279390071T

Celedón-Neghme C, San Martin LA, Victoriano PF and Cavieres LA Legitimate seed dispersal by lizards in an alpine habitat: The case of Berberis empetrifolia (Berberidaceae) dispersed by Liolaemus belii (Tropiduridae). Acta Oecologica 33, 265-271.  http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1146609X08000131

Vidal MA and Sabat P Stable isotopes document mainland–island divergence in resource use without concomitant physiological changes in the lizard Liolaemus pictus. Comparative Biochemistry and Physiology Part B: Biochemistry and Molecular Biology 156, 61-67.  http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1096495910000485

 


RIRDC Farm Diversity Website: http://www.farmdiversity.com.au/

 

Rural Industries Research and Development Corporation (RIRDC)
Home Page

RIRDC New and Developing Plant Industries
Home Page

includes publications and project reports

RIRDC New Crop Industries Handbook
530 pages
as pdf download


RIRDC
essential oils, tea tree oil, wildflowers and natives, bioenergy, organic farming


Grateful acknowledgment is made to the following: for plant names: Australian Plant Name Index, Australian National Herbarium http://www.anbg.gov.au/cpbr/databases/apni-search-full.html; ; The International Plant Names Index, Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew/Harvard University Herbaria/Australian National Herbarium http://www.ipni.org/index.html; Plants Database, United States Department of Agriculture, National Resources Conservation Service http://plants.usda.gov/;DJ Mabberley (1997) The Plant Book, Cambridge University Press (Second Edition); JH Wiersma and B Leon (1999) World Economic Plants, CRC Press; RJ Hnatiuk (1990) Census of Australian Vascular Plants, Australian Government Publishing Service; for information: Science Direct http://www.sciencedirect.com/; Wiley Online Library http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/advanced/search; High Wire http://highwire.stanford.edu/cgi/search; Oxford Journals http://services.oxfordjournals.org/search.dtl; USDA National Agricultural Library http://agricola.nal.usda.gov/booleancube/booleancube_search_cit.html; for synonyms: The Plant List http://www.theplantlist.org/; for common names: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page; etc.


All information is included in good faith but this website does not warrant or guarantee the accuracy of any information on these pages, nor does the website accept responsibility for any loss arising from the use of this information.  Views and opinions are those of the authors themselves.  Every effort has been made to respect copyright owners' rights. 


Contact: Webmaster, Australian New Crops Website
australiannewcrops@gmail.com
Latest update March 2017 by: ANCW