Australian New Crops Info 2016
Supported by the Rural Industries Research and Development Corporation

Listing of Interesting Plants of the World:

Nigella hispanica

 

 

This species is usually known as:

Nigella hispanica

 

This species has also been known as:

Nigella hispanica subsp. atlantica

 

Common names:

Spanish Fennel

 

 

Trends (five databases) 1901-2013:
[Number of papers mentioning Nigella hispanica: 16]

 

 

Popularity of Nigella hispanica over time
[Left-hand Plot: Plot of numbers of papers mentioning Nigella hispanica (histogram and left hand axis scale of left-hand plot) and line of best fit, 1901 to 2013 (equation and % variation accounted for in box); Right-hand Plot: Plot of a proportional micro index, derived from numbers of papers mentioning Nigella hispanica as a proportion (scaled by multiplying by one million) of the approximate total number of papers available in databases for that year (frequency polygon and left-hand axis scale of right-hand plot) and line of best fit, 1901 to 2013 (equation and % variation accounted for in box)] 

[For larger charts showing the numbers of papers that have mentioned this species over years, select this link; there are links to come back from there]

 

Keywords

[Total number of keywords included in the papers that mentioned this species: 27]

 

Bioprospecting (2), Dioscorides (2), History (2), Materia medica (2), New drug discovery (2), Traditional medicine (2), aconicarpyrazine A and B (1), Aconitum carmichaelii (1), Chemotaxonomy (1), Consolida regalis (1), Delphinium elatum (1), Essential oils (1), Fatty acids (1), new taxa (1), Nigella (1), Nigella hispanica (1), Nigella nigellastrum (1), nigella papillosa subsp. atlantica (1), pyrazines (1), taxonomy (1), Terpenes (1)

 

[If all keywords are not here (as indicated by .....), they can be accessed from this link; there are links to come back from there]

 

 

Most likely scope for crop use/product (%):
[Please note: When there are only a few papers mentioning a species, care should be taken with the interpretation of these crop use/product results; as well, a mention may relate to the use of a species, or the context in which it grows, rather than a product]

 

medicinal (76.19), essential oil (6.79), timber (2.25), fruit (1.80), poison (1.78), weed (1.36), ornamental (1.14), nutraceutical (0.57), grain legume (0.56), oilseed/fat (0.55)…..

 

[To see the full list of crop use/product outcomes, from searching abstracts of the papers that have mentioned this species, select this link; details of the analysis process have also been included; there are links to come back from there]

 

 

Recent mentions of this species in the literature:
[since 2012, with links to abstracts; The references from 1901-2013 which have been used for the trend, keyword and crop use/product analyses below, are listed below these references]

 

Farag MA, Gad HA, Heiss AG and Wessjohann LA (2014) Metabolomics driven analysis of six Nigella species seeds via UPLC-qTOF-MS and GC–MS coupled to chemometrics. Food Chemistry 151, 333-342. //www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0308814613016567

(2012) Subject Index. Chemistry & Biodiversity 9, 2875-2921. http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/cbdv.201290014

(2012) Author Index. Chemistry & Biodiversity 9, 2855-2874. http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/cbdv.201290013

Kokoska L, Urbanova K, et al. (2012) Essential Oils in the Ranunculaceae Family: Chemical Composition of Hydrodistilled Oils from Consolida regalis, Delphinium elatum, Nigella hispanica, and N. nigellastrum Seeds. Chemistry & Biodiversity 9, 151-161. http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/cbdv.201100048

 

 

References 1901-2013 (and links to abstracts):
[Number of papers mentioning Nigella hispanica: 16; Any undated papers have been included at the end]

 

Kokoska L, Urbanova K, et al. (2012) Essential Oils in the Ranunculaceae Family: Chemical Composition of Hydrodistilled Oils from Consolida regalis, Delphinium elatum, Nigella hispanica, and N. nigellastrum Seeds. Chemistry & Biodiversity 9, 151-161.  http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/cbdv.201100048

Kokoska L, Urbanova K, et al. (2012) Essential oils in the ranunculaceae family: chemical composition of hydrodistilled oils from Consolida regalis, Delphinium elatum, Nigella hispanica, and N. nigellastrum seeds. Chem Biodivers 9, 151-61.

Paula DV (2010) European materia medica in historical texts: Longevity of a tradition and implications for future use. Journal of Ethnopharmacology 132, 28-47.  http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0378874110003557

Landa P, Marsik P, Havlik J, Kloucek P, Vanek T and Kokoska L (2009) Evaluation of antimicrobial and anti-inflammatory activities of seed extracts from six Nigella species. J Med Food 12, 408-15.

Tashiro S, Tian C-e, Watahiki MK and Yamamoto KT (2009) Changes in growth kinetics of stamen filaments cause inefficient pollination in massugu2, an auxin insensitive, dominant mutant of Arabidopsis thaliana. Physiologia Plantarum 137, 175-187.  http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1399-3054.2009.01271.x

Cayenne Engel E and Irwin RE (2003) Linking pollinator visitation rate and pollen receipt. Am. J. Botany 90, 1612-1618.  http://www.amjbot.org/cgi/content/abstract/90/11/1612

Escaravage N, Flubacker E, Pornon A, Doche B and Till-Bottraud I (2001) Stamen dimorphism in Rhododendron ferrugineum (Ericaceae): development and function. Am. J. Botany 88, 68-75.  http://www.amjbot.org/cgi/content/abstract/88/1/68

Lobello G, Fambrini M, Baraldi R, Lercari B and Pugliesi C (2000) Hormonal influence on photocontrol of the protandry in the genus Helianthus. J. Exp. Bot. 51, 1403-1412.  http://jxb.oxfordjournals.org/cgi/content/abstract/51/349/1403

Heslop-Harrison JS, Heslop-Harrison Y and Reger BJ (1987) Anther-filament Extension in Lilium: Potassium lon Movement and Some Anatomical Features. Ann. Bot. 59, 505-515.  http://aob.oxfordjournals.org/cgi/content/abstract/59/5/505

Lopez Gonzalez G (1984) Nigella hispanica L. and new problems derived from Article 39 of the International Code of Botanical Nomenclature. Nigella hispanica L. y nuevos problemas derivados del Articulo 9.3 del ICBN. Anales del Jardin Botanico de Madrid., 2.

Lord EM and Mayers AM (1982) Effects of Gibberellic Acid on Floral Development in vivo and in vitro in the Cleistogamous Species, Lamium amplexicaule L. Ann. Bot. 50, 301-307.  http://aob.oxfordjournals.org/cgi/content/abstract/50/3/301

Rao IVR and Ram HYM (1982) Specificity of Gibberellin and Sucrose-promoted Flower Bud Growth in Gladiolus. Ann. Bot. 50, 473-479.  http://aob.oxfordjournals.org/cgi/content/abstract/50/4/473

LORD EM (1979) Physiological Controls on the Production of Cleistogamous and Chasmogamous Flowers in Lamium amplexicaule L. Ann. Bot. 44, 757-766.  http://aob.oxfordjournals.org/cgi/content/abstract/44/6/757

Murakami Y (1975) The role of gibberellins in the growth of floral organs of Mirabilis jalapa. Plant Cell Physiol. 16, 337-345.  http://pcp.oxfordjournals.org/cgi/content/abstract/16/2/337

Blake J (1969) The Effect of Environmental and Nutritional Factors on the Development of Flower Apices Cultured in vitro. J. Exp. Bot. 20, 113-123.  http://jxb.oxfordjournals.org/cgi/content/abstract/20/1/113

Blackburn KB (1917) On the Vascular Anatomy of the Young Epicotyl in some Ranalean Forms. Ann. Bot. os-31, 151-180.  http://aob.oxfordjournals.org

De Vos P European materia medica in historical texts: Longevity of a tradition and implications for future use. Journal of Ethnopharmacology 132, 28-47.  http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0378874110003557

Guo L, Peng C, Dai O, Geng Z, Guo Y-P, Xie X-F, He C-J and Li X-H Two new pyrazines from the parent roots of Aconitum carmichaelii. Biochemical Systematics and Ecology 48, 92-95.  http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0305197812002724

 


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Grateful acknowledgment is made to the following: for plant names: Australian Plant Name Index, Australian National Herbarium http://www.anbg.gov.au/cpbr/databases/apni-search-full.html; ; The International Plant Names Index, Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew/Harvard University Herbaria/Australian National Herbarium http://www.ipni.org/index.html; Plants Database, United States Department of Agriculture, National Resources Conservation Service http://plants.usda.gov/;DJ Mabberley (1997) The Plant Book, Cambridge University Press (Second Edition); JH Wiersma and B Leon (1999) World Economic Plants, CRC Press; RJ Hnatiuk (1990) Census of Australian Vascular Plants, Australian Government Publishing Service; for information: Science Direct http://www.sciencedirect.com/; Wiley Online Library http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/advanced/search; High Wire http://highwire.stanford.edu/cgi/search; Oxford Journals http://services.oxfordjournals.org/search.dtl; USDA National Agricultural Library http://agricola.nal.usda.gov/booleancube/booleancube_search_cit.html; for synonyms: The Plant List http://www.theplantlist.org/; for common names: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page; etc.


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