Australian New Crops Info 2016
Supported by the Rural Industries Research and Development Corporation

Listing of Interesting Plants of the World:

Nowellia curvifolia

 

 

This species is usually known as:

Nowellia curvifolia

 

This species has also been known as:

Nowellia curvifolia var. aciliata

 

No common names have been found

 

 

Trends (five databases) 1901-2013:
[Number of papers mentioning Nowellia curvifolia: 25]

 

 

Popularity of Nowellia curvifolia over time
[Left-hand Plot: Plot of numbers of papers mentioning Nowellia curvifolia (histogram and left hand axis scale of left-hand plot) and line of best fit, 1901 to 2013 (equation and % variation accounted for in box); Right-hand Plot: Plot of a proportional micro index, derived from numbers of papers mentioning Nowellia curvifolia as a proportion (scaled by multiplying by one million) of the approximate total number of papers available in databases for that year (frequency polygon and left-hand axis scale of right-hand plot) and line of best fit, 1901 to 2013 (equation and % variation accounted for in box)] 

[For larger charts showing the numbers of papers that have mentioned this species over years, select this link; there are links to come back from there]

 

Keywords

[Total number of keywords included in the papers that mentioned this species: 90]

 

Bryophytes (4), Indicator species (3), Biodiversity (2), Bryophyta (2), Coarse woody debris (2), Conservation (2), Dead wood (2), Fungi (2), Germinability (2), Lichens (2), Liverworts (2), Lophozia ascendens (2), Lophozia longiflora (2), Lophozia ventricosa (2), mosses and liverworts (2), Vegetative reproduction (2), Algae (1), bibenzyls (1), Biofuel harvest (1), cell walls (1), chemotaxonomy. (1), Coarse woody debris (CWD) (1), Conifer plantations (1), Deadwood (1), Decay stage (1), Diameter class (1), Disturbance (1), divergence times (1), Diversity (1), Epixylic species (1), Fagus sylvatica (1), Forest (1), Forest age (1), Forest management (1), fossombronia foveolata (1), France (1), galactans (1), gymnocolea inflata (1), haplomitrium mnioides (1), Hepaticae (1), Hepaticopsida (1), histochemistry (1), Hydrangea macrophylla (1), jungermannia leiantha (1), land plants (1), Log (1), Lorraine / mossball / chorology / bryological inventories (1), Lorraine / mousse en boule / chorologie / inventaires bryologiques (1), lunularic acid (1), lunularin (1), Management (1), Microclimate (1), molecular clock (1), Mosses (1), nowellia curvifolia (1), phylogeny (1), plant development (1), plant morphology (1), protein content (1), Red-listed species (1), Refugia (1), riccardia sinuata (1), Riccia (1), riccia duplex (1), Saxifragaceae (1), scapania nemorosa (1), stilbenes (1), Stump (1), taxonomy (1), Temperate broadleaved deciduous forest (1), Woodland key habitats (1)

 

[If all keywords are not here (as indicated by .....), they can be accessed from this link; there are links to come back from there]

 

 

Most likely scope for crop use/product (%):
[Please note: When there are only a few papers mentioning a species, care should be taken with the interpretation of these crop use/product results; as well, a mention may relate to the use of a species, or the context in which it grows, rather than a product]

 

timber (76.54), boundary (7.76), medicinal (2.20), fruit (1.60), poison (1.59), biofuel (1.03), starch (0.72), cereal (0.51), nutraceutical (0.50), grain legume (0.50)…..

 

[To see the full list of crop use/product outcomes, from searching abstracts of the papers that have mentioned this species, select this link; details of the analysis process have also been included; there are links to come back from there]

 

 

Recent mentions of this species in the literature:
[since 2012, with links to abstracts; The references from 1901-2013 which have been used for the trend, keyword and crop use/product analyses below, are listed below these references]

 

Cooper ED, Henwood MJ and Brown EA (2012) Are the liverworts really that old? Cretaceous origins and Cenozoic diversifications in Lepidoziaceae reflect a recurrent theme in liverwort evolution. Biological Journal of the Linnean Society 107, 425-441. http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1095-8312.2012.01946.x

 

 

References 1901-2013 (and links to abstracts):
[Number of papers mentioning Nowellia curvifolia: 25; Any undated papers have been included at the end]

 

Cooper ED, Henwood MJ and Brown EA (2012) Are the liverworts really that old? Cretaceous origins and Cenozoic diversifications in Lepidoziaceae reflect a recurrent theme in liverwort evolution. Biological Journal of the Linnean Society 107, 425-441.  http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1095-8312.2012.01946.x

Holá E, Kučera J and Těšitel J (2011) Comparison of gemma production among three Lophozia species during the growing season. Flora - Morphology, Distribution, Functional Ecology of Plants 206, 763-768.  http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0367253011000740

Rajandu E, Kikas K and Paal J (2009) Bryophytes and decaying wood in Hepatica site-type boreo-nemoral Pinus sylvestris forests in Southern Estonia. Forest Ecology and Management 257, 994-1003.  http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0378112708008244

Paltto H, Nordén B and Götmark F (2008) Partial cutting as a conservation alternative for oak (Quercus spp.) forest—Response of bryophytes and lichens on dead wood. Forest Ecology and Management 256, 536-547.  http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0378112708003861

Nordén B, Paltto H, Götmark F and Wallin K (2007) Indicators of biodiversity, what do they indicate? – Lessons for conservation of cryptogams in oak-rich forest. Biological Conservation 135, 369-379.  http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0006320706004307

Ódor P, Heilmann-Clausen J, et al. (2006) Diversity of dead wood inhabiting fungi and bryophytes in semi-natural beech forests in Europe. Biological Conservation 131, 58-71.  http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0006320706000577

Fenton NJ and Frego KA (2005) Bryophyte (moss and liverwort) conservation under remnant canopy in managed forests. Biological Conservation 122, 417-430.  http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0006320704003982

Gustafsson L, Hylander K and Jacobson C (2004) Uncommon bryophytes in Swedish forests—key habitats and production forests compared. Forest Ecology and Management 194, 11-22.  http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0378112704001148

Kottke I, Beiter A, Weiss M, Haug I, Oberwinkler F and Nebel M (2003) Heterobasidiomycetes form symbiotic associations with hepatics: Jungermanniales have sebacinoid mycobionts while Aneura pinguis (Metzgeriales) is associated with a Tulasnella species. Mycological Research 107, 957-968.  http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0953756208612873

Humphrey JW, Davey S, Peace AJ, Ferris R and Harding K (2002) Lichens and bryophyte communities of planted and semi-natural forests in Britain: the influence of site type, stand structure and deadwood. Biological Conservation 107, 165-180.  http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0006320702000575

(2001) Index du tome 22. Cryptogamie Bryologie 22, 291-301.  http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1290079601890076

Rice SK, Collins D and Anderson AM (2001) Functional significance of variation in bryophyte canopy structure. Am. J. Botany 88, 1568-1576.  http://www.amjbot.org/cgi/content/abstract/88/9/1568

Vanderpoorten A, Sotiaux A and Sotiaux O (2001) Integrating bryophytes into a forest management plan: lessons from grid-mapping in the forest of Soignes (Belgium). Cryptogamie Bryologie 22, 217-230.  http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1290079601900069

Schnittler M, Stephenson SL and Novozhilov YK (2000) Ecology and world distribution of Barbeyella minutissima (Myxomycetes). Mycological Research 104, 1518-1523.  http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0953756208615166

Sanna L (1992) The threatened epixylic bryophytes in old primeval forests in Finland. Biological Conservation 59, 151-154.  http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/0006320792905758

Basile DV and Basile MR (1987) The occurrence of cell wall-associated arabinogalactan proteins in the Hepaticae. Bryologist. 90, 400-404.

Meininger CA, Uetz GW and Snider JA (1985) Variation in epiphytic microcommunities (tardigrade-lichen-bryophyte assemblages) of the Cincinnati, Ohio area. Urban Ecology 9, 45-61.  http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/0304400985900166

John G (1977) Lunularic acid and related compounds in liverworts, algae and Hydrangea. Phytochemistry 16, 249-253.  http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0031942200867953

Leconinte A and Foucault Bd (1977) The Nowellia curvifolia (Dicks.) Mitt. and the bryological associations on decaying wood in the Bois de la Tour, near Falaise (Calvados Lower Normandy) Le Nowellia curvifolia (Dicks.) Mitt. et les associations bryologiques des bois pourrissants dans le Bois de la Tour, pres de Falaise (Calvados Basse normandie). Revue bryologique et lichenologique 43, 2.

Schertler MM (1977) Morphology and developmental anatonmy in the leafy hepatic Nowellia curvifolia (Dicks.) Mitt. Journal of the Hattori Botanical Laboratory. 42, 42.

Brown JB (1975) REVIEWS. Forestry 48, 218-220.  http://forestry.oxfordjournals.org

I BH (1975) The possible significance of variations in the mitotic systems of the aquatic fungi (phycomycetes). Biosystems 7, 351-359.  http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/0303264775900143

Jones EW (1975) REVIEWS. Forestry 48, 216-218.  http://forestry.oxfordjournals.org

Basile DV (1970) Hydroxy-L-proline- and 2,2’-Dipyridyl-Induced Phenovariations in the Liverwort Nowellia curvifolia. Science 170, 1218-1220.  http://www.sciencemag.org/cgi/content/abstract/170/3963/1218

Zbar B, Bernstein I, Tanaka T and Rapp HJ (1970) Tumor Immunity Produced by the Intradermal Inoculation of Living Tumor Cells and Living Mycobacterium bovis (Strain BCG). Science 170, 1217-1218.  http://www.sciencemag.org/cgi/content/abstract/170/3963/1217

Index du tome 21. Cryptogamie Bryologie 21, 349-360.  http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1290079601800109

HolÁ E, KuCera J and TÄ›Šitel J Comparison of gemma production among three Lophozia species during the growing season. Flora - Morphology, Distribution, Functional Ecology of Plants 206, 763-768.  http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0367253011000740

Thierry M Contribution ŕ l’étude de la bryoflore Lorraine. Cryptogamie Bryologie 21, 247-256.  http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S129007960080005X

 


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Grateful acknowledgment is made to the following: for plant names: Australian Plant Name Index, Australian National Herbarium http://www.anbg.gov.au/cpbr/databases/apni-search-full.html; ; The International Plant Names Index, Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew/Harvard University Herbaria/Australian National Herbarium http://www.ipni.org/index.html; Plants Database, United States Department of Agriculture, National Resources Conservation Service http://plants.usda.gov/;DJ Mabberley (1997) The Plant Book, Cambridge University Press (Second Edition); JH Wiersma and B Leon (1999) World Economic Plants, CRC Press; RJ Hnatiuk (1990) Census of Australian Vascular Plants, Australian Government Publishing Service; for information: Science Direct http://www.sciencedirect.com/; Wiley Online Library http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/advanced/search; High Wire http://highwire.stanford.edu/cgi/search; Oxford Journals http://services.oxfordjournals.org/search.dtl; USDA National Agricultural Library http://agricola.nal.usda.gov/booleancube/booleancube_search_cit.html; for synonyms: The Plant List http://www.theplantlist.org/; for common names: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page; etc.


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Latest update March 2017 by: ANCW