Australian New Crops Info 2016
Supported by the Rural Industries Research and Development Corporation

Listing of Interesting Plants of the World:

Nymphaea X

 

 

This species name was not found in The Plant List

 

This species has no synonyms in The Plant List

 

No common names have been found

 

 

Trends (five databases) 1901-2013:
[Number of papers mentioning Nymphaea X: 13]

 

 

Popularity of Nymphaea X over time
[Left-hand Plot: Plot of numbers of papers mentioning Nymphaea X (histogram and left hand axis scale of left-hand plot) and line of best fit, 1901 to 2013 (equation and % variation accounted for in box); Right-hand Plot: Plot of a proportional micro index, derived from numbers of papers mentioning Nymphaea X as a proportion (scaled by multiplying by one million) of the approximate total number of papers available in databases for that year (frequency polygon and left-hand axis scale of right-hand plot) and line of best fit, 1901 to 2013 (equation and % variation accounted for in box)] 

[For larger charts showing the numbers of papers that have mentioned this species over years, select this link; there are links to come back from there]

 

Keywords

[Total number of keywords included in the papers that mentioned this species: 89]

 

chemical constituents of plants (3), chemical structure (3), leaves (3), nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (3), Nymphaea (3), 2D NMR (2), Alkaloids (2), Aminoalkaloids (2), anthocyanins (2), Aquatic plants (2), Biological assessment (2), color (2), European Mistletoe (2), IBI (2), Macophytes (2), Minnesota lakes (2), spectral analysis (2), Viscum album L. (2), 13C-NMR (1), 1H–15N HMBC (1), 1H–15N HMBC (1), 4,5,4′,5′-Tetrahydroxy-3,3′-iminodibenzoic acid (1), 4,5,4′-Trihydroxy-3,3′-iminodibenzoic acid (1), 4,5,4′,5′-Tetrahydroxy-3,3′-iminodibenzoic acid (1), 4,5,4′-Trihydroxy-3,3′-iminodibenzoic acid (1), 5-glycosyl isoflavones (1), Active components (1), Antioxidant activity (1), Australopithecus (1), Benthic foraminifera (1), Catechins (1), corolla (1), Cuba (1), cultivars (1), derivatives (1), Diet (1), flavonoids (1), flavonol 3′-xylosides (1), Flavonol glycosides (1), flavonols (1), flowers (1), Holocene (1), Hominid ecology (1), Hominid evolution (1), India (1), Last common ancestor (1), Mangroves (1), Mole-rats (1), MS (1), myricetin3-rhamnosyl(1→6)galactoside (1), N. elegans (1), N. gracilis (1), N. pulchella (1), Nymphaea ampla (1), Nymphaéa x marliacea (1), Nymphaeaceae (1), Nymphaéaceae (1), Paranthropus (1), Pollen (1), quercetin (1), Roots (1), Sea level (1), Taxonomic character (1), Tea (Camellia sinensis) flower (1), Tubers (1), water lilies (1)

 

[If all keywords are not here (as indicated by .....), they can be accessed from this link; there are links to come back from there]

 

 

Most likely scope for crop use/product (%):
[Please note: When there are only a few papers mentioning a species, care should be taken with the interpretation of these crop use/product results; as well, a mention may relate to the use of a species, or the context in which it grows, rather than a product]

 

aquatic (48.14), chewing (41.21), beverage (6.60), charcoal (2.11), weed (0.18), ornamental (0.15), timber (0.13), starch (0.11), fruit (0.08), cereal (0.08)…..

 

[To see the full list of crop use/product outcomes, from searching abstracts of the papers that have mentioned this species, select this link; details of the analysis process have also been included; there are links to come back from there]

 

 

Recent mentions of this species in the literature:
[since 2012, with links to abstracts; The references from 1901-2013 which have been used for the trend, keyword and crop use/product analyses below, are listed below these references]

 

Lukács BA, Vojtkó AE, Mesterházy A, Molnár V A, Süveges K, Végvári Z, Brusa G and Cerabolini BEL (2017) Growth-form and spatiality driving the functional difference of native and alien aquatic plants in Europe. Ecology and Evolution 7, 950-963. http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ece3.2703

Overballe-Petersen MV, Nielsen AB, Hannon GE, Halsall K and Bradshaw RH (2013) Long-term forest dynamics at Gribskov, eastern Denmark with early-Holocene evidence for thermophilous broadleaved tree species. The Holocene 23, 243-254. http://hol.sagepub.com/cgi/content/abstract/23/2/243

Radomski P and Perleberg D (2012) Application of a versatile aquatic macrophyte integrity index for Minnesota lakes. Ecological Indicators 20, 252-268. http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1470160X12000581

 

 

References 1901-2013 (and links to abstracts):
[Number of papers mentioning Nymphaea X: 13; Any undated papers have been included at the end]

 

Overballe-Petersen MV, Nielsen AB, Hannon GE, Halsall K and Bradshaw RH (2013) Long-term forest dynamics at Gribskov, eastern Denmark with early-Holocene evidence for thermophilous broadleaved tree species. The Holocene 23, 243-254.  http://hol.sagepub.com/cgi/content/abstract/23/2/243

Radomski P and Perleberg D (2012) Application of a versatile aquatic macrophyte integrity index for Minnesota lakes. Ecological Indicators 20, 252-268.  http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1470160X12000581

Yang Z, Tu Y, Baldermann S, Dong F, Xu Y and Watanabe N (2009) Isolation and identification of compounds from the ethanolic extract of flowers of the tea (Camellia sinensis) plant and their contribution to the antioxidant capacity. LWT - Food Science and Technology 42, 1439-1443.  http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0023643809000942

Peros MC, Reinhardt EG and Davis AM (2007) A 6000-year record of ecological and hydrological changes from Laguna de la Leche, north coastal Cuba. Quaternary Research 67, 69-82.  http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0033589406001062

Laden G and Wrangham R (2005) The rise of the hominids as an adaptive shift in fallback foods: Plant underground storage organs (USOs) and australopith origins. Journal of Human Evolution 49, 482-498.  http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S004724840500093X

Marquina S, Bonilla-Barbosa J and Alvarez L (2005) Comparative phytochemical analysis of four Mexican Nymphaea species. Phytochemistry 66, 921-927.  http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0031942205000919

Fossen T, Åge Frøystein N and Andersen ØM (1998) Myricetin 3-rhamnosyl(1→6)galactoside from Nymphaéa x marliacea. Phytochemistry 49, 1997-2000.  http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0031942298004208

Fossen T, Froystein NA and Andersen OM (1998) Myricetin 3-rhamnosyl(1 leads to 6) galactoside from Nymphaea X marliacea. Phytochemistry. 49, 1997-2000.

Fossen T, Larsen A and Andersen OM (1998) Anthocyanins from flowers and leaves of Nymphaea x marliaceae cultivars. Phytochemistry. 48, 823-827.

(1997) Subject index. Phytochemistry 46, xxv-xxxii.  http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0031942297864011

Fossen T and Andersen OM (1997) Acylated anthocyanins from leaves of the water lily, Nymphaea x marliacea. Phytochemistry. 46, 353-357.

Fossen T and Andersen ØM (1997) Acylated anthocyanins from leaves of the water lily, Nymphaéa × marliacea. Phytochemistry 46, 353-357.  http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0031942297002938

Subrahmanyam GV (1980) Meiotic behaviour in Nymphaea x daubeniana Hort. Indian journal of horticulture. 37, 314-315.

Amer B, Juvik OJ, Dupont F, Francis GW and Fossen T Novel aminoalkaloids from European mistletoe (Viscum album L.). Phytochemistry Letters.  http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S187439001200136X

Amer B, Juvik OJ, Dupont Fdr, Francis GW and Fossen T Novel aminoalkaloids from European mistletoe (Viscum album L.). Phytochemistry Letters 5, 677-681.  http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S187439001200136X

Radomski P and Perleberg D Application of a versatile aquatic macrophyte integrity index for Minnesota lakes. Ecological Indicators 20, 252-268.  http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1470160X12000581

 


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Grateful acknowledgment is made to the following: for plant names: Australian Plant Name Index, Australian National Herbarium http://www.anbg.gov.au/cpbr/databases/apni-search-full.html; ; The International Plant Names Index, Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew/Harvard University Herbaria/Australian National Herbarium http://www.ipni.org/index.html; Plants Database, United States Department of Agriculture, National Resources Conservation Service http://plants.usda.gov/;DJ Mabberley (1997) The Plant Book, Cambridge University Press (Second Edition); JH Wiersma and B Leon (1999) World Economic Plants, CRC Press; RJ Hnatiuk (1990) Census of Australian Vascular Plants, Australian Government Publishing Service; for information: Science Direct http://www.sciencedirect.com/; Wiley Online Library http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/advanced/search; High Wire http://highwire.stanford.edu/cgi/search; Oxford Journals http://services.oxfordjournals.org/search.dtl; USDA National Agricultural Library http://agricola.nal.usda.gov/booleancube/booleancube_search_cit.html; for synonyms: The Plant List http://www.theplantlist.org/; for common names: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page; etc.


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Latest update March 2017 by: ANCW