Australian New Crops Info 2016
Supported by the Rural Industries Research and Development Corporation

Listing of Interesting Plants of the World:

Nymphoides aquatica

 

 

This species is usually known as:

Nymphoides aquatic

 

This species has also been known as:

Villarsia aquatica

 

Common names:

Big Floatingheart, Banana Plant, Banana Lilly

 

 

Trends (five databases) 1901-2013:
[Number of papers mentioning Nymphoides aquatica: 19]

 

 

Popularity of Nymphoides aquatica over time
[Left-hand Plot: Plot of numbers of papers mentioning Nymphoides aquatica (histogram and left hand axis scale of left-hand plot) and line of best fit, 1901 to 2013 (equation and % variation accounted for in box); Right-hand Plot: Plot of a proportional micro index, derived from numbers of papers mentioning Nymphoides aquatica as a proportion (scaled by multiplying by one million) of the approximate total number of papers available in databases for that year (frequency polygon and left-hand axis scale of right-hand plot) and line of best fit, 1901 to 2013 (equation and % variation accounted for in box)] 

[For larger charts showing the numbers of papers that have mentioned this species over years, select this link; there are links to come back from there]

 

Keywords

[Total number of keywords included in the papers that mentioned this species: 131]

 

Everglades (5), Nymphaea odorata (5), nymphoides aquatica (3), peat (3), restoration (3), Amazon River (2), Aquatic plants (2), Aquatic vegetation (2), Australia (2), C and N isotopes (2), Decomposition (2), Development (2), Eleocharis elongata (2), Floc (2), Flocculent (2), Florida (2), Freshwater aquatic plant (2), Hydroecology (2), Isotope (2), Juvenile growth (2), Landscape geomorphology (2), LOES (2), Low oxygen escape syndrome (2), Morphology (2), N:P ratio (2), Nymphaeaceae (2), Nymphoides peltata (2), Palynology (2), Phosphorus (2), Relative sea-level (2), Sediment transport (2), Seed germination (2), Seedling growth (2), Submergence-escape (2), Sympodial (2), Utricularia (2), Water depth (2), Wetland (2), Wetland development (2), wetlands (2), anthropogenic (1), Aquatic angiosperms (1), Aquatic weeds (1), Asterales (1), Bed shear stress (1), Biogeography (1), Biological integrity (1), Biological metrics (1), Classification and regression trees (1), Depressional wetlands (1), Dioecy (1), Drought (1), Exotic species (1), fertilizers (1), Fire (1), Florida Everglades (1), Florida Wetland Condition Index (1), Flow through vegetation (1), Forested wetlands (1), growth (1), Hydrology (1), Hydrophytes (1), Introduction pathways (1), Landscape Development Intensity (1), Marajó Island (1), Marajó Island (1), Mesocosm (1), Model (1), Modeling (1), paleoecology (1), Rapid assessment (1), Risk assessment (1), Self-organization (1), Slough (1), Sympatric (1), tillage (1), Uniform mitigation assessment method (1), Urban wetlands (1), Wading birds (1), Water gardening (1), Water lily (1), Wetland condition (1)

 

[If all keywords are not here (as indicated by .....), they can be accessed from this link; there are links to come back from there]

 

 

Most likely scope for crop use/product (%):
[Please note: When there are only a few papers mentioning a species, care should be taken with the interpretation of these crop use/product results; as well, a mention may relate to the use of a species, or the context in which it grows, rather than a product]

 

aquatic (87.23), ornamental (4.38), insectivorous (4.00), medicinal (0.60), fruit (0.44), poison (0.43), green manure (0.25), starch (0.20), weed (0.15), cereal (0.14)…..

 

[To see the full list of crop use/product outcomes, from searching abstracts of the papers that have mentioned this species, select this link; details of the analysis process have also been included; there are links to come back from there]

 

 

Recent mentions of this species in the literature:
[since 2012, with links to abstracts; The references from 1901-2013 which have been used for the trend, keyword and crop use/product analyses below, are listed below these references]

 

Tucker AO and Janick J (2016) Identification of Phytomorphs in the Voynich Codex. In ‘Horticultural Reviews Volume 44’ (Ed.^(Eds  pp. 1-64. (John Wiley & Sons, Inc.). http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/9781119281269.ch1

Wasekura H, Horie S, Fujii S and Maki M (2016) Molecular identification of alien species of Vallisneria (Hydrocharitaceae) species in Japan with a special emphasis on the commercially traded accessions and the discovery of hybrid between nonindigenous V. spiralis and native V. denseserrulata. Aquatic Botany 128, 1-6. http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0304377015300176

Jensen CD and Gujarathi NP (2015) Characterization of a macrophyte microcosm as a surface water treatment system for antibiotics. Environmental Progress & Sustainable Energy 34, 1605-1612. http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ep.12158

Lo Galbo AM, Zimmerman MS, Hallac D, Reynolds G, Richards JH and Lynch JH (2013) Using hydrologic suitability for native Everglades slough vegetation to assess Everglades restoration scenarios. Ecological Indicators 24, 294-304. http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1470160X12002427

Tippery NP and Les DH (2013) Hybridization and systematics of dioecious North American Nymphoides (N. aquatica and N. cordata; Menyanthaceae). Aquatic Botany 104, 127-137. http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0304377012001325

Richards JH and Cao C (2012) Germination and early growth of Nymphaea odorata at different water depths. Aquatic Botany 98, 12-19. http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0304377011001768

Smith CB, Cohen MCL, Pessenda LCR, França MC and Guimarães JTF (2012) Holocenic proxies of sedimentary organic matter and the evolution of Lake Arari-Amazon Region. CATENA 90, 26-38. http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0341816211001810

Tippery NP, Les DH and Jones CS (2012) Evolution of inflorescence architecture in Nymphoides (Menyanthaceae). Aquatic Botany 99, 11-19. http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0304377012000022

 

 

References 1901-2013 (and links to abstracts):
[Number of papers mentioning Nymphoides aquatica: 19; Any undated papers have been included at the end]

 

Richards JH and Cao C (2012) Germination and early growth of Nymphaea odorata at different water depths. Aquatic Botany 98, 12-19.  http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0304377011001768

Smith CB, Cohen MCL, Pessenda LCR, França MC and Guimarães JTF (2012) Holocenic proxies of sedimentary organic matter and the evolution of Lake Arari-Amazon Region. CATENA 90, 26-38.  http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0341816211001810

Tippery NP, Les DH and Jones CS (2012) Evolution of inflorescence architecture in Nymphoides (Menyanthaceae). Aquatic Botany 99, 11-19.  http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0304377012000022

Harvey JW, Noe GB, Larsen LG, Nowacki DJ and McPhillips LE (2011) Field flume reveals aquatic vegetation’s role in sediment and particulate phosphorus transport in a shallow aquatic ecosystem. Geomorphology 126, 297-313.  http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0169555X10001479

Richards JH, Dow M and Troxler T (2010) Modeling Nymphoides architecture: A morphological analysis of Nymphoides aquatica (Menyanthaceae). Am. J. Botany 97, 1761-1771.  http://www.amjbot.org/cgi/content/abstract/97/11/1761

Larsen LG, Harvey JW and Crimaldi JP (2009) Predicting bed shear stress and its role in sediment dynamics and restoration potential of the Everglades and other vegetated flow systems. Ecological Engineering 35, 1773-1785.  http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0925857409002432

Troxler TG and Richards JH (2009) δ13C, δ15N, carbon, nitrogen and phosphorus as indicators of plant ecophysiology and organic matter pathways in Everglades deep slough, Florida, USA. Aquatic Botany 91, 157-165.  http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0304377009000552

Troxler TG and Richards JH (2009) δ13C, δ15N, carbon, nitrogen and phosphorus as indicators of plant ecophysiology and organic matter pathways in Everglades deep slough, Florida, USA. Aquatic Botany 91, 157-165.  http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0304377009000552

Kelly Chinners R (2006) Florida Wetland Condition Index for depressional forested wetlands. Ecological Indicators 6, 337-352.  http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1470160X0500035X

Cohen MJ, Lane CR, Reiss KC, Surdick JA, Bardi E and Brown MT (2005) Vegetation based classification trees for rapid assessment of isolated wetland condition. Ecological Indicators 5, 189-206.  http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1470160X05000142

Maki K and Galatowitsch S (2004) Movement of invasive aquatic plants into Minnesota (USA) through horticultural trade. Biological Conservation 118, 389-396.  http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0006320703003835

Smith SM, Gawlik DE, Rutchey K, Crozier GE and Gray S (2003) Assessing drought-related ecological risk in the Florida Everglades. Journal of Environmental Management 68, 355-366.  http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0301479703001026

Richards JH (2001) Bladder function in Utricularia purpurea (Lentibulariaceae): is carnivory important? Am. J. Botany 88, 170-176.  http://www.amjbot.org/cgi/content/abstract/88/1/170

Cohen AD, Gage CP, Moore WS and VanPelt RS (1999) Combining organic petrography and palynology to assess anthropogenic impacts on peatlands: Part 2. An example from a Carolina Bay wetland at the Savannah River Site in South Carolina. International Journal of Coal Geology 39, 47-95.  http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0166516298000408

Adey WH, Finn M, Kangas P, Lange L, Luckett C and Spoon DM (1996) A Florida Everglades Mesocosm — model veracity after four years of self-organization. Ecological Engineering 6, 171-224.  http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/0925857495000577

Sutton DL (1994) Culture of banana-lilies. Proceedings of the ... annual meeting of the Florida State Horticultural Society., 106.

Ronald L S (1993) Phytogeographical outline of aquatic and wetland angiosperms in continental eastern North America. Aquatic Botany 44, 259-301.  http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/0304377093900736

Greening HS and Gerritsen J (1987) Changes in macrophyte community structure following drought in the okefenokee swamp, Georgia, U.S.A. Aquatic Botany 28, 113-128.  http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/0304377087900349

W.A W (1980) Late-Quaternary vegetation history at White Pond on the inner Coastal Plain of South Carolina. Quaternary Research 13, 187-199.  http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/0033589480900289

Harvey JW, Noe GB, Larsen LG, Nowacki DJ and McPhillips LE Field flume reveals aquatic vegetation’s role in sediment and particulate phosphorus transport in a shallow aquatic ecosystem. Geomorphology 126, 297-313.  http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0169555X10001479

Lo Galbo AM, Zimmerman MS, Hallac D, Reynolds G, Richards JH and Lynch JH Using hydrologic suitability for native Everglades slough vegetation to assess Everglades restoration scenarios. Ecological Indicators 24, 294-304.  http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1470160X12002427

Richards JH and Cao C Germination and early growth of Nymphaea odorata at different water depths. Aquatic Botany 98, 12-19.  http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0304377011001768

Richards JH, Dow M and Troxler T Modeling Nymphoides architecture: A morphological analysis of Nymphoides aquatica (Menyanthaceae). Am. J. Botany 97, 1761-1771.  http://www.amjbot.org/cgi/content/abstract/97/11/1761

Smith CB, Cohen MCL, Pessenda LCR, França MC and Guimarães JTF Holocenic proxies of sedimentary organic matter and the evolution of Lake Arari-Amazon Region. CATENA 90, 26-38.  http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0341816211001810

Tippery NP and Les DH Hybridization and systematics of dioecious North American Nymphoides (N. aquatica and N. cordata; Menyanthaceae). Aquatic Botany 104, 127-137.  http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0304377012001325

Tippery NP, Les DH and Jones CS Evolution of inflorescence architecture in Nymphoides (Menyanthaceae). Aquatic Botany 99, 11-19.  http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0304377012000022

 


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Grateful acknowledgment is made to the following: for plant names: Australian Plant Name Index, Australian National Herbarium http://www.anbg.gov.au/cpbr/databases/apni-search-full.html; ; The International Plant Names Index, Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew/Harvard University Herbaria/Australian National Herbarium http://www.ipni.org/index.html; Plants Database, United States Department of Agriculture, National Resources Conservation Service http://plants.usda.gov/;DJ Mabberley (1997) The Plant Book, Cambridge University Press (Second Edition); JH Wiersma and B Leon (1999) World Economic Plants, CRC Press; RJ Hnatiuk (1990) Census of Australian Vascular Plants, Australian Government Publishing Service; for information: Science Direct http://www.sciencedirect.com/; Wiley Online Library http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/advanced/search; High Wire http://highwire.stanford.edu/cgi/search; Oxford Journals http://services.oxfordjournals.org/search.dtl; USDA National Agricultural Library http://agricola.nal.usda.gov/booleancube/booleancube_search_cit.html; for synonyms: The Plant List http://www.theplantlist.org/; for common names: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page; etc.


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Latest update March 2017 by: ANCW