Australian New Crops Info 2016
Supported by the Rural Industries Research and Development Corporation

Listing of Interesting Plants of the World:

Quercus hemisphaerica

 

 

This species is usually known as:

Quercus hemisphaerica

 

This species has also been known as:

Quercus hemisphaerica var. maritima, Quercus hemisphaerica var. nana

 

Common names:

Darlington Oak, Sand Laurel Oak, Laurel Oak, Laurel-Leaf Oak

 

 

Trends (five databases) 1901-2013:
[Number of papers mentioning Quercus hemisphaerica: 31]

 

 

Popularity of Quercus hemisphaerica over time
[Left-hand Plot: Plot of numbers of papers mentioning Quercus hemisphaerica (histogram and left hand axis scale of left-hand plot) and line of best fit, 1901 to 2013 (equation and % variation accounted for in box); Right-hand Plot: Plot of a proportional micro index, derived from numbers of papers mentioning Quercus hemisphaerica as a proportion (scaled by multiplying by one million) of the approximate total number of papers available in databases for that year (frequency polygon and left-hand axis scale of right-hand plot) and line of best fit, 1901 to 2013 (equation and % variation accounted for in box)] 

[For larger charts showing the numbers of papers that have mentioned this species over years, select this link; there are links to come back from there]

 

Keywords

[Total number of keywords included in the papers that mentioned this species: 201]

 

Quercus (5), Species richness (4), Longleaf pine (3), Pinus taeda (3), quercus hemisphaerica (3), Wetlands (3), Alabama (2), Biodiversity (2), clearcutting (2), Decomposition (2), Fire frequency (2), Fire management (2), Florida (2), Groundwater (2), Hardwood (2), Italy (2), leaf conductance (2), LIDAR (2), Litter quality (2), Microbial community (2), Most-frequent fire hypothesis (2), Phospholipid <ARROW fatty acids (PLFA) (2), Pine tree (2), Pinus echinata (2), Pinus pinaster (2), Pinus pinea (2), Ravenna (2), Salinity tolerance (2), Saltwater intrusion (2), Saturation hypothesis (2), Savanna (2), Simulation model (2), South Carolina (2), species differences (2), Succession (2), transpiration (2), acetic acid (1), additive partitioning (1), application rate (1), arthropod pests (1), artificial regeneration (1), bacteria (1), beta diversity (1), biomarkers (1), bog oak (1), Boreioglycaspis (1), botanical composition (1), butyric acid (1), calcium (1), carbohydrates (1), carbon offset (1), chemical composition (1), chemical constituents of plants (1), Coastal Plain (1), Competition index (1), costs and returns (1), diameter (1), disease course (1), disturbance (1), diurnal variation (1), ecoinformatics (1), Ecological classification (1), Ecological restoration (1), evapotranspiration (1), fertilizers (1), Fire strategy (1), Flammability (1), Forest floor (1), forest litter (1), forest management (1), forest product markets (DOWN>1), forest succession (1), forestry (1), Functions (1), gas exchange (1), golf course (1), habitat diversity (1), habitat selection (1), Harvests (1), height (1), Host range (1), Individual-based approach (1), infection (1), inorganic ions (1), invasive hardwoods (1), ions (1), Joyce Kilmer-Slickrock Wilderness (1), Land units (1), Ligustrum japonicum (1), Longleaf pine ecosystems (1), longleaf pine forests (1), longleaf pine restoration (1), lumber (1), magnesium (1), Melaleuca (1), methane (1), Mississippi (1)…..

 

[If all keywords are not here (as indicated by .....), they can be accessed from this link; there are links to come back from there]

 

 

Most likely scope for crop use/product (%):
[Please note: When there are only a few papers mentioning a species, care should be taken with the interpretation of these crop use/product results; as well, a mention may relate to the use of a species, or the context in which it grows, rather than a product]

 

timber (70.79), ornamental (4.19), medicinal (2.98), turf (2.49), shade (1.84), poison (1.76), fruit (1.42), weed (1.25), starch (0.98), cereal (0.70)…..

 

[To see the full list of crop use/product outcomes, from searching abstracts of the papers that have mentioned this species, select this link; details of the analysis process have also been included; there are links to come back from there]

 

 

Recent mentions of this species in the literature:
[since 2012, with links to abstracts; The references from 1901-2013 which have been used for the trend, keyword and crop use/product analyses below, are listed below these references]

 

Cherry MJ, Warren RJ and Mike Conner L (2016) Fear, fire, and behaviorally mediated trophic cascades in a frequently burned savanna. Forest Ecology and Management 368, 133-139. http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0378112716300706

Slack AW, Zeibig-Kichas NE, Kane JM and Varner JM (2016) Contingent resistance in longleaf pine (Pinus palustris) growth and defense 10 years following smoldering fires. Forest Ecology and Management 364, 130-138. http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0378112716000153

Andruk CM, Schwope C and Fowler NL (2014) The joint effects of fire and herbivory on hardwood regeneration in central Texas woodlands. Forest Ecology and Management 334, 193-200. http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0378112714005362

Baber O, Slot M, Celis G and Kitajima K (2014) Diel patterns of leaf carbohydrate concentrations differ between seedlings and mature trees of two sympatric oak species. Botany. 92, 535-540. http://dx.doi.org/10.1139/cjb-2014-0032

Vaughn RM, Hostetler M, Escobedo FJ and Jones P (2014) The influence of subdivision design and conservation of open space on carbon storage and sequestration. Landscape and Urban Planning 131, 64-73. http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0169204614001790

Bray SR, Kitajima K and Mack MC (2012) Temporal dynamics of microbial communities on decomposing leaf litter of 10 plant species in relation to decomposition rate. Soil Biology and Biochemistry 49, 30-37. http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0038071712000612

Glitzenstein JS, Streng DR, Masters RE, Robertson KM and Hermann SM (2012) Fire-frequency effects on vegetation in north Florida pinelands: Another look at the long-term Stoddard Fire Research Plots at Tall Timbers Research Station. Forest Ecology and Management 264, 197-209. http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0378112711006281

 

 

References 1901-2013 (and links to abstracts):
[Number of papers mentioning Quercus hemisphaerica: 31; Any undated papers have been included at the end]

 

Bray SR, Kitajima K and Mack MC (2012) Temporal dynamics of microbial communities on decomposing leaf litter of 10 plant species in relation to decomposition rate. Soil Biology and Biochemistry 49, 30-7. http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0038071712000612

Glitzenstein JS, Streng DR, Masters RE, Robertson KM and Hermann SM (2012) Fire-frequency effects on vegetation in north Florida pinelands: Another look at the long-term Stoddard Fire Research Plots at Tall Timbers Research Station. Forest Ecology and Management 264, 197-209. http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0378112711006281

Kirchoff BK, Leggett R, Her V, Moua C, Morrison J and Poole C (2011) Principles of visual key construction-with a visual identification key to the Fagaceae of the southeastern United States. AoB Plants 2011, plr005-. http://aobpla.oxfordjournals.org/cgi/content/abstract/2011/0/plr005

Loudermilk EL, Cropper Jr WP, Mitchell RJ and Lee H (2011) Longleaf pine (Pinus palustris) and hardwood dynamics in a fire-maintained ecosystem: A simulation approach. Ecological Modelling 222, 2733-50. http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0304380011002626

Antonellini M and Mollema PN (2010) Impact of groundwater salinity on vegetation species richness in the coastal pine forests and wetlands of Ravenna, Italy. Ecological Engineering 36, 1201-11. http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S092585740900353X

Broschat TK and Moore KA (2010) Effects of Fertilization on the Growth and Quality of Container-grown Areca Palm and Chinese Hibiscus during Establishment in the Landscape. HortTechnology 20, 389-94. http://horttech.ashspublications.org/cgi/content/abstract/20/2/389

Brockway DG, Outcalt KW, Estes BL and Rummer RB (2009) Vegetation response to midstorey mulching and prescribed burning for wildfire hazard reduction and longleaf pine (Pinus palustris Mill.) ecosystem restoration. Forestry 82, 299-314. http://forestry.oxfordjournals.org/cgi/content/abstract/82/3/299

Dilcher DL, Kowalski EA, Wiemann MC, Hinojosa LF and Lott TA (2009) A climatic and taxonomic comparison between leaf litter and standing vegetation from a Florida swamp woodland. Am. J. Botany 96, 1108-15. http://www.amjbot.org/cgi/content/abstract/96/6/1108

Broschat TK, Sandrock DR, Elliott ML and Gilman EF (2008) Effects of Fertilizer Type on Quality and Nutrient Content of Established Landscape Plants in Florida. HortTechnology 18, 278-85. http://horttech.ashspublications.org/cgi/content/abstract/18/2/278

Kane JM, Varner JM and Hiers JK (2008) The burning characteristics of southeastern oaks: Discriminating fire facilitators from fire impeders. Forest Ecology and Management 256, 2039-45. http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0378112708005884

Condon B and Putz FE (2007) Countering the Broadleaf Invasion: Financial and Carbon Consequences of Removing Hardwoods during Longleaf Pine Savanna Restoration. Restoration Ecology 15, 296-303. http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1526-100X.2007.00212.x

Fridley JD, Vandermast DB, Kuppinger DM, Manthey M and Peet RK (2007) Co-occurrence based assessment of habitat generalists and specialists: a new approach for the measurement of niche width. Journal of Ecology 95, 707-22. http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1365-2745.2007.01236.x

Greipsson S and DiTommaso A (2006) Invasive Non-native Plants Alter the Occurrence of Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Fungi and Benefit from This Association. Ecological Rest. 24, 236-41. http://er.uwpress.org/cgi/content/abstract/24/4/236

Zhao D, Borders B, Wilson M and Rathbun SL (2006) Modeling neighborhood effects on the growth and survival of individual trees in a natural temperate species-rich forest. Ecological Modelling 196, 90-102. http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0304380006000585

Anonymous (2005) Oak Trees. In ‘Van Nostrand’s Scientific Encyclopedia’. (Ed.^(Eds  pp. (John Wiley & Sons, Inc.). http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/0471743984.vse5183

Vose JM, Harvey GJ, Elliott KJ and Clinton BD (2005) Measuring and Modeling Tree and Stand Level Transpiration. In ‘Water Encyclopedia’. (Ed.^(Eds  pp. (John Wiley & Sons, Inc.). http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/047147844X.aw2207

Stanturf JA, Conner WH, Gardiner ES, Schweitzer CJ and Ezell AW (2004) Recognizing and Overcoming Difficult Site Conditions for Afforestation of Bottomland Hardwoods. Ecological Rest. 22, 183-93. http://er.uwpress.org

Cupp EW, Klingler K, Hassan HK, Viguers LM and Unnasch TR (2003) TRANSMISSION OF EASTERN EQUINE ENCEPHALOMYELITIS VIRUS IN CENTRAL ALABAMA. Am J Trop Med Hyg 68, 495-500. http://www.ajtmh.org/cgi/content/abstract/68/4/495

Heuberger KA and Putz FE (2003) Fire in the Suburbs: Ecological Impacts of Prescribed Fire in Small Remnants of Longleaf Pine (Pinus palustris) Sandhill. Restoration Ecology 11, 72-81. http://dx.doi.org/10.1046/j.1526-100X.2003.09982.x

Spritzer MD and Brazeau D (2003) Direct vs. Indirect Benefits of Caching by Gray Squirrels (Sciurus carolinensis). Ethology 109, 559-75. http://dx.doi.org/10.1046/j.1439-0310.2003.00897.x

Wineriter SA, Buckingham GR and Howard Frank J (2003) Host range of Boreioglycaspis melaleucae Moore (Hemiptera: Psyllidae), a potential biocontrol agent of Melaleuca quinquenervia (Cav.) S.T. Blake (Myrtaceae), under quarantine. Biological Control 27, 273-92. http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1049964403000252

Harcombe PA, Bill CJ, Fulton M, Glitzenstein JS, Marks PL and Elsik IS (2002) Stand dynamics over 18 years in a southern mixed hardwood forest, Texas, USA. Journal of Ecology 90, 947-57. http://dx.doi.org/10.1046/j.1365-2745.2002.00735.x

Xu Z, Leininger TD, Lee AWC and Tainter FH (2001) Chemical properties associated with bacterial wetwood in red oaks. Wood and fiber science : journal of the Society of Wood Science and Technology. 33, 76-83.

Jones RH, Glover GR and Kimbrell JW (2000) Three methods for low-cost regeneration of pine-hardwood stands in the Gulf Coastal Plain. Southern journal of applied forestry. 24, 37-44.

Provencher L, Herring BJ, Gordon DR, Rodgers HL, Tanner GW, Brennan LA and Hardesty JL (2000) Restoration of Northwest Florida Sandhills Through Harvest of Invasive Pinus clausa. Restoration Ecology 8, 175-85. http://dx.doi.org/10.1046/j.1526-100x.2000.80025.x

Carter RE, MacKenzie MD and H. Gjerstad D (1999) Ecological land classification in the Southern Loam Hills of south Alabama. Forest Ecology and Management 114, 395-404. http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0378112798003703

Lockaby BG, Stanturf JA and Messina MG (1997) Effects of silvicultural activity on ecological processes in floodplain forests of the southern United States: a review of existing reports. Forest Ecology and Management 90, 93-100. http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0378112796038972

Messina MG, Schoenholtz SH, Lowe MW, Wang Z, Gunter DK and Londo AJ (1997) Initial responses of woody vegetation, water quality, and soils to harvesting intensity in a Texas bottomland hardwood ecosystem. Forest Ecology and Management 90, 201-15. http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0378112796038959

Vaitkus MR and McLeod KW (1995) Photosynthesis and water-use efficiency of two sandhill oaks following additions of water and nutrients. Bulletin of the Torrey Botanical Club. 122, 30-9.

Gilman EF and Yeager TH (1991) Fertilizer type and nitrogen rate affects field-grown laurel oak and Japanese ligustrum. Proceedings of the ... annual meeting of the Florida State Horticulture Society., 103.

Faeth SH, Mopper S and Simberloff D (1981) Abundances and diversity of leaf-mining insects on three oak host species : effects of host-plant phenology and nitrogen content of leaves. Oikos. 37, 238-51.

Antonellini M and Mollema PN Impact of groundwater salinity on vegetation species richness in the coastal pine forests and wetlands of Ravenna, Italy. Ecological Engineering 36, 1201-11. http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S092585740900353X

Bray SR, Kitajima K and Mack MC Temporal dynamics of microbial communities on decomposing leaf litter of 10 plant species in relation to decomposition rate. Soil Biology and Biochemistry 49, 30-7. http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0038071712000612

Broschat TK and Moore KA Effects of Fertilization on the Growth and Quality of Container-grown Areca Palm and Chinese Hibiscus during Establishment in the Landscape. HortTechnology 20, 389-94. http://horttech.ashspublications.org/cgi/content/abstract/20/2/389

Glitzenstein JS, Streng DR, Masters RE, Robertson KM and Hermann SM Fire-frequency effects on vegetation in north Florida pinelands: Another look at the long-term Stoddard Fire Research Plots at Tall Timbers Research Station. Forest Ecology and Management 264, 197-209. http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0378112711006281

Kirchoff BK, Leggett R, Her V, Moua C, Morrison J and Poole C Principles of visual key construction-with a visual identification key to the Fagaceae of the southeastern United States. AoB Plants 2011, plr005-. http://aobpla.oxfordjournals.org/cgi/content/abstract/2011/0/plr005

Loudermilk EL, Cropper Jr WP, Mitchell RJ and Lee H Longleaf pine (Pinus palustris) and hardwood dynamics in a fire-maintained ecosystem: A simulation approach. Ecological Modelling 222, 2733-50. http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0304380011002626

 


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Grateful acknowledgment is made to the following: for plant names: Australian Plant Name Index, Australian National Herbarium http://www.anbg.gov.au/cpbr/databases/apni-search-full.html; ; The International Plant Names Index, Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew/Harvard University Herbaria/Australian National Herbarium http://www.ipni.org/index.html; Plants Database, United States Department of Agriculture, National Resources Conservation Service http://plants.usda.gov/;DJ Mabberley (1997) The Plant Book, Cambridge University Press (Second Edition); JH Wiersma and B Leon (1999) World Economic Plants, CRC Press; RJ Hnatiuk (1990) Census of Australian Vascular Plants, Australian Government Publishing Service; for information: Science Direct http://www.sciencedirect.com/; Wiley Online Library http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/advanced/search; High Wire http://highwire.stanford.edu/cgi/search; Oxford Journals http://services.oxfordjournals.org/search.dtl; USDA National Agricultural Library http://agricola.nal.usda.gov/booleancube/booleancube_search_cit.html; for synonyms: The Plant List http://www.theplantlist.org/; for common names: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page; etc.


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