Australian New Crops Info 2016
Supported by the Rural Industries Research and Development Corporation

Listing of Interesting Plants of the World:

Quercus inopina

 

 

This species is usually known as:

Quercus inopina

 

This species has no synonyms in The Plant List

 

Common names:

Sandhill Oak, Inopina Oak

 

 

Trends (five databases) 1901-2013:
[Number of papers mentioning Quercus inopina: 26]

 

 

Popularity of Quercus inopina over time
[Left-hand Plot: Plot of numbers of papers mentioning Quercus inopina (histogram and left hand axis scale of left-hand plot) and line of best fit, 1901 to 2013 (equation and % variation accounted for in box); Right-hand Plot: Plot of a proportional micro index, derived from numbers of papers mentioning Quercus inopina as a proportion (scaled by multiplying by one million) of the approximate total number of papers available in databases for that year (frequency polygon and left-hand axis scale of right-hand plot) and line of best fit, 1901 to 2013 (equation and % variation accounted for in box)] 

[For larger charts showing the numbers of papers that have mentioned this species over years, select this link; there are links to come back from there]

 

Keywords

[Total number of keywords included in the papers that mentioned this species: 133]

 

Florida (6), Lake Wales Ridge (4), Scrub (4), Fruit production (3), Quercus (3), alternate disturbances (2), Consumers (2), Digestible nutrients (2), Florida rosemary scrub (2), Hickory (2), Mantel test (2), Masting (2), Mechanical disturbance (2), Moran's I (2), Oaks (2), Ordination (2), Palmettos (2), Pasture (2), quercus inopina (2), quercus myrtifolia (2), relative growth rate (2), sandhill (2), Shrubland (2), Spatial structure (2), survival (2), Age structure (1), biomass (1), Boundary (1), branches (1), Ceratiola ericoides scrub (1), CO2 (1), Community diversity (1), Community structure (1), conservation (1), Dioecy (1), Dissimilarity coefficient (1), Disturbance ecology (1), elevated CO2 (1), Ephemeral herb (1), establishment (1), Fire effect (1), fire effects (1), fire suppression (1), Fire-return interval (1), fires (1), Flatwoods (1), forest fires (1), forestry (1), Gap dynamics (1), Gap size (1), insect herbivory (1), isozymes (1), Kennedy Space Center (1), Land management (1), Landscape gradient (1), Layering (1), leaf abscission (1), leaf age (1), leaf conductance (1), leaf water potential (1), management (1), metapopulation (1), Minirhizotrons (1), modulus of elasticity (1), Monte Carlo simulation (1), natural regeneration (1), Occupancy (1), osmotic pressure (1), plant biochemistry (1), plant ecology (1), plant organs (1), plant physiology (1), quercus chapmanii (1), quercus geminata (1), rare species (1), Recruitment (1), Reproductive allocation (1), Resprouting (1), Root growth (1), Root length density (1), Root mortality (1), Root turnover (1), Scrubby flatwood (1), seasonal variation (1), Seedling (1), Seedling recruitment (1), Sex ratio (1), shrublands (1), Split moving window (1), Time since fire (1), Transition zone (1), turgor (1), twigs (1), Vegetation change (1), woody plants (1), Wunderlin (1982). (1), Xerophyte (1), xylem water potential (1)

 

[If all keywords are not here (as indicated by .....), they can be accessed from this link; there are links to come back from there]

 

 

Most likely scope for crop use/product (%):
[Please note: When there are only a few papers mentioning a species, care should be taken with the interpretation of these crop use/product results; as well, a mention may relate to the use of a species, or the context in which it grows, rather than a product]

 

cane/bamboo (76.80), green manure (8.72), timber (4.43), fruit (3.05), medicinal (1.12), poison (0.81), weed (0.62), starch (0.37), cereal (0.26), nutraceutical (0.26)…..

 

[To see the full list of crop use/product outcomes, from searching abstracts of the papers that have mentioned this species, select this link; details of the analysis process have also been included; there are links to come back from there]

 

 

Recent mentions of this species in the literature:
[since 2012, with links to abstracts; The references from 1901-2013 which have been used for the trend, keyword and crop use/product analyses below, are listed below these references]

 

Dee JR and Menges ES (2014) Gap ecology in the Florida scrubby flatwoods: effects of time-since-fire, gap area, gap aggregation and microhabitat on gap species diversity. Journal of Vegetation Science 25, 1235-1246. http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/jvs.12170

Schafer JL and Mack MC (2014) Growth, Biomass, and Allometry of Resprouting Shrubs after Fire in Scrubby Flatwoods. American midland naturalist. 172, 266-284. http://dx.doi.org/10.1674%2F0003-0031-172.2.266

Kim T and Holt R (2012) The direct and indirect effects of fire on the assembly of insect herbivore communities: examples from the Florida scrub habitat. Oecologia 168, 997-1012.

Kim TN and Holt RD (2012) The direct and indirect effects of fire on the assembly of insect herbivore communities: examples from the Florida scrub habitat. Oecologia. 168, 997-1012. http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00442-011-2130-x

Navarra JJ and Quintana-Ascencio PF (2012) Spatial pattern and composition of the Florida scrub seed bank and vegetation along an anthropogenic disturbance gradient. Applied Vegetation Science 15, 349-358. http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1654-109X.2011.01176.x

URen JM, Lutzoni F, Miadlikowska J, Laetsch AD and Arnold AE (2012) Host and geographic structure of endophytic and endolichenic fungi at a continental scale. Am. J. Botany 99, 898-914. http://www.amjbot.org/cgi/content/abstract/99/5/898

 

 

References 1901-2013 (and links to abstracts):
[Number of papers mentioning Quercus inopina: 26; Any undated papers have been included at the end]

 

Kim T and Holt R (2012) The direct and indirect effects of fire on the assembly of insect herbivore communities: examples from the Florida scrub habitat. Oecologia 168, 997-1012.

Navarra JJ and Quintana-Ascencio PF (2012) Spatial pattern and composition of the Florida scrub seed bank and vegetation along an anthropogenic disturbance gradient. Applied Vegetation Science 15, 349-58. http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1654-109X.2011.01176.x

U’Ren JM, Lutzoni F, Miadlikowska J, Laetsch AD and Arnold AE (2012) Host and geographic structure of endophytic and endolichenic fungi at a continental scale. Am. J. Botany 99, 898-914. http://www.amjbot.org/cgi/content/abstract/99/5/898

Kulahci IG and Bowman R (2011) Recaching Decisions of Florida Scrub-Jays are Sensitive to Ecological Conditions. Ethology 117, 700-7. http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1439-0310.2011.01924.x

Menges ES, Weekley CW, Clarke GL and Smith SA (2011) Effects of Hurricanes on Rare Plant Demography in Fire-Controlled Ecosystems. Biotropica 43, 450-8. http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1744-7429.2010.00728.x

Weekley CW, Menges ES, Berry-Greenlee D, Rickey MA, Clarke GL and Smith SA (2011) Burning more effective than mowing in restoring Florida scrub. Ecological Rest. 29, 357-73. http://er.uwpress.org/cgi/content/abstract/29/4/357

Menges ES, Craddock A, Salo J, Zinthefer R and Weekley CW (2008) Gap ecology in Florida scrub: Species occurrence, diversity and gap properties. Journal of Vegetation Science 19, 503-14. http://dx.doi.org/10.3170/2008-8-18399

Boughton EA, Quintana-Ascencio AF, Menges ES and Boughton RK (2006) Association of ecotones with relative elevation and fire in an upland Florida landscape. Journal of Vegetation Science 17, 361-8. http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1654-1103.2006.tb02456.x

Grimm EC, Watts WA, Jacobson Jr GL, Hansen BCS, Almquist HR and Dieffenbacher-Krall AC (2006) Evidence for warm wet Heinrich events in Florida. Quaternary Science Reviews 25, 2197-211. http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S027737910600165X

Maliakal-Witt S, Menges ES and Denslow JS (2005) Microhabitat distribution of two Florida scrub endemic plants in comparison to their habitat-generalist congeners. Am. J. Botany 92, 411-21. http://www.amjbot.org/cgi/content/abstract/92/3/411

Abrahamson WG and Layne JN (2002) Relation of ramet size to acorn production in five oak species of xeric upland habitats in south-central Florida. Am. J. Botany 89, 124-31. http://www.amjbot.org/cgi/content/abstract/89/1/124

Dilustro JJ, Day FP, Drake BG and Hinkle CR (2002) Abundance, production and mortality of fine roots under elevated atmospheric CO2 in an oak-scrub ecosystem. Environmental and Experimental Botany 48, 149-59. http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0098847202000205

Johnson AF and Abrahamson WG (2002) Stem turnover in the rhizomatous scrub oak, Quercus inopina, from south-central Florida. American midland naturalist. 147, 237-46.

Stiling P, Cattell M, Moon DC, Rossi A, Hungate BA, Hymus G and Drake B (2002) Elevated atmospheric CO2 lowers herbivore abundance, but increases leaf abscission rates. Global Change Biology 8, 658-67. http://dx.doi.org/10.1046/j.1365-2486.2002.00501.x

Quintana-Ascencio PF and Menges ES (2000) Competitive abilities of three narrowly endemic plant species in experimental neighborhoods along a fire gradient. Am. J. Botany 87, 690-9. http://www.amjbot.org/cgi/content/abstract/87/5/690

Quintana-Ascencio PF, Dolan RW and Menges ES (1998) Hypericum cumulicola demography in unoccupied and occupied Florida scrub patches with different time-since-fire. Journal of Ecology 86, 640-51. http://dx.doi.org/10.1046/j.1420-9101.1996.t01-1-9030381.x

Abrahamson WG and Abrahamson CR (1996) Effects of fire on long-unburned Florida uplands. Journal of Vegetation Science 7, 565-74. http://dx.doi.org/10.2307/3236306

Berry DM and Menges ES (1995) Postfire regeneration and clonal growth strategies of two Florida scrub oaks. General technical report INT / 320, 320.

Gibson DJ and Menges ES (1994) Population structure and spatial pattern in the dioecious shrub Ceratiola ericoides. Journal of Vegetation Science 5, 337-46. http://dx.doi.org/10.2307/3235857

Ostertag R and Menges ES (1994) Patterns of reproductive effort with time since last fire in Florida scrub plants. Journal of Vegetation Science 5, 303-10. http://dx.doi.org/10.2307/3235853

Abrams MD and Menges ES (1992) Leaf ageing and plateau effects on seasonal pressure-volume relationships in three sclerophyllous Quercus species in south-eastern USA. Functional ecology., 3.

McCoy ED and Mushinsky HR (1992) Rarity of Organisms in the Sand Pine Scrub Habitat of Florida

Rareza de los organismos en un hábitat arenoso de pinares enanos en La Florida. Conservation Biology 6, 537-48. http://dx.doi.org/10.1046/j.1523-1739.1992.06040537.x

Anonymous (1990) Subject index. Tree Physiol 7, 349-67. http://treephys.oxfordjournals.org

Weekley CW, Menges ES, Berry-Greenlee D, Rickey MA, Clarke GL and Smith SA (1990) Subject index

Burning more effective than mowing in restoring Florida scrub. Tree Physiol 7, 349-67. http://treephys.oxfordjournals.org

http://er.uwpress.org/cgi/content/abstract/29/4/357

Feiertag JA, Robertson DJ and King T (1989) Slash And Turn. Ecological Rest. 7, 13-7. http://er.uwpress.org

Johnson AF, Abrahamson WG and McCrea KD (1986) Comparison of biomass recovery after fire of a seeder (Ceratiola ericoides) and a sprouter (Quercus inopina) species from South-central Florida. American midland naturalist. 116, 423-8.

Kim TN and Holt RD The direct and indirect effects of fire on the assembly of insect herbivore communities: examples from the Florida scrub habitat. Oecologia.

Kulahci IG and Bowman R Recaching Decisions of Florida Scrub-Jays are Sensitive to Ecological Conditions. Ethology 117, 700-7. http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1439-0310.2011.01924.x

Layne JN and Abrahamson WG Spatiotemporal variation of fruit digestible-nutrient production in Florida’s uplands. Acta Oecologica 36, 675-83. http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1146609X10001153

Layne JN and Abrahamson WG Spatiotemporal variation of fruit digestible-nutrient production in Florida’s uplands. Acta Oecologica 36, 675-83. http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1146609X10001153

Menges ES, Weekley CW, Clarke GL and Smith SA Effects of Hurricanes on Rare Plant Demography in Fire-Controlled Ecosystems. Biotropica 43, 450-8. http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1744-7429.2010.00728.x

Navarra JJ and Quintana-Ascencio PF Spatial pattern and composition of the Florida scrub seed bank and vegetation along an anthropogenic disturbance gradient. Applied Vegetation Science, n/a-n/a. http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1654-109X.2011.01176.x

 


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Grateful acknowledgment is made to the following: for plant names: Australian Plant Name Index, Australian National Herbarium http://www.anbg.gov.au/cpbr/databases/apni-search-full.html; ; The International Plant Names Index, Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew/Harvard University Herbaria/Australian National Herbarium http://www.ipni.org/index.html; Plants Database, United States Department of Agriculture, National Resources Conservation Service http://plants.usda.gov/;DJ Mabberley (1997) The Plant Book, Cambridge University Press (Second Edition); JH Wiersma and B Leon (1999) World Economic Plants, CRC Press; RJ Hnatiuk (1990) Census of Australian Vascular Plants, Australian Government Publishing Service; for information: Science Direct http://www.sciencedirect.com/; Wiley Online Library http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/advanced/search; High Wire http://highwire.stanford.edu/cgi/search; Oxford Journals http://services.oxfordjournals.org/search.dtl; USDA National Agricultural Library http://agricola.nal.usda.gov/booleancube/booleancube_search_cit.html; for synonyms: The Plant List http://www.theplantlist.org/; for common names: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page; etc.


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