Australian New Crops Info 2016
Supported by the Rural Industries Research and Development Corporation

Listing of Interesting Plants of the World:

Quercus parvula

 

 

This species is usually known as:

Quercus parvula, Quercus parvula var. shrevei

 

This species has also been known as:

Quercus parvula var. parvula

 

Common names:

Coast Oak, Interior Live Oak, Sierra Live Oak, Santa Cruz Island Oak, Shreve Oak, Tamalpais Oak

 

 

Trends (five databases) 1901-2013:
[Number of papers mentioning Quercus parvula: 21]

 

 

Popularity of Quercus parvula over time
[Left-hand Plot: Plot of numbers of papers mentioning Quercus parvula (histogram and left hand axis scale of left-hand plot) and line of best fit, 1901 to 2013 (equation and % variation accounted for in box); Right-hand Plot: Plot of a proportional micro index, derived from numbers of papers mentioning Quercus parvula as a proportion (scaled by multiplying by one million) of the approximate total number of papers available in databases for that year (frequency polygon and left-hand axis scale of right-hand plot) and line of best fit, 1901 to 2013 (equation and % variation accounted for in box)] 

[For larger charts showing the numbers of papers that have mentioned this species over years, select this link; there are links to come back from there]

 

Keywords

[Total number of keywords included in the papers that mentioned this species: 144]

 

Phytophthora ramorum (8), sudden oak death (5), Quercus agrifolia (4), Coast live oak (3), emerging infectious disease (3), invasive species (3), Biomass (2), California (2), Chaparral (2), Community ordination (2), Douglas-fir (2), Forest carbon (2), Forest inventory (2), Landscape disease pattern (2), Landscape epidemiology (2), Lithocarpus densiflorus (2), Mediterranean climate forest (2), Natural disaster (2), Quercus parvula var. shrevei (2), Shreve's Oak (2), Spatial autocorrelation (2), Species distribution model (2), Species distribution models (2), Tanoak (2), Tree diversity (2), Tree mortality (2), University of California Santa Cruz - Forest Ecology Research Plot (2), Vegetation analysis (2),  amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) (1), Ambrosia and bark beetles (1), attraction (1), Big Sur (1), Blue gum (1), branches (1), cankers (1), chloroplast DNA (1), clinal variation (1), Coleoptera (1), community structure (1), comparative phylogeography (1), connectivity (1), conservation genetics (1), crown (1), disease outbreaks (1), Disease spread (1), disease susceptibility (1), Early-detection monitoring (1), ecological niche model (1), Environmental monitoring (1), Environmental niche modeling (1), evolution (1), experimental infections (1), forest ecology (1), forest trees (1), fragmentation (1), fungal diseases of plants (1), gene pool management (1), genetic algorithm for rule-set prediction (1), genetic diversity (1), Geographic information systems (1), GIS (1), glaciation (1), Growth (1), host colonization (1), hybridization (1), interacting disturbances (1), Internet (1), Internet resource (1), invasive forest pathogen (1), landscape pathology (1), microsatellite DNA (1), migration (1), Modeling (1), molecular marker (1), molecular sequence data (1), mortality (1), Oak mortality (1), pathogenicity (1), permethrin (1), Pinus radiata (1), plant communities (1), population structure (1), Pseudotsuga menziesii (1), Quercus (1), Quercus kelloggii (1), Risk modeling (1), roots (1), sap (1), Scolytidae (1), Selection management (1), Silviculture (1), spatial distribution (1), speciation (1), species diversity (1), Stand dynamics (1), Stand structure (1), sudden oak death (SOD) (1), symptoms (1), temperate forests (1), tropical forests (1), Umbellularia californica (1), wildfire (1)

 

[If all keywords are not here (as indicated by .....), they can be accessed from this link; there are links to come back from there]

 

 

Most likely scope for crop use/product (%):
[Please note: When there are only a few papers mentioning a species, care should be taken with the interpretation of these crop use/product results; as well, a mention may relate to the use of a species, or the context in which it grows, rather than a product]

 

timber (40.13), ornamental (39.52), medicinal (2.66), fruit (1.94), poison (1.93), shade (1.86), weed (1.46), starch (0.88), cereal (0.62), nutraceutical (0.61)…..

 

[To see the full list of crop use/product outcomes, from searching abstracts of the papers that have mentioned this species, select this link; details of the analysis process have also been included; there are links to come back from there]

 

 

Recent mentions of this species in the literature:
[since 2012, with links to abstracts; The references from 1901-2013 which have been used for the trend, keyword and crop use/product analyses below, are listed below these references]

 

Chen G, Metz MR, Rizzo DM, Dillon WW and Meentemeyer RK (2015) Object-based assessment of burn severity in diseased forests using high-spatial and high-spectral resolution MASTER airborne imagery. ISPRS Journal of Photogrammetry and Remote Sensing 102, 38-47. http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0924271615000210

Elliott M, Shamoun SF and Sumampong G (2015) Effects of systemic and contact fungicides on life stages and symptom expression of Phytophthora ramorum in vitro and in planta. Crop Protection 67, 136-144. http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0261219414003202

Kelly S and Boston K (2015) Chapter 19 - Garcia River Forest, California, United States of America. In ‘Forest Plans of North America’. (Ed.^(Eds  pp. 159-167. (Academic Press: San Diego). http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/B9780127999364000199

Ferchaw VAL, Goldsworthy E, Pinkerton J, Yun DI, Lund UJ, Mark W, Valkonen S and Piirto DD (2013) Management strategies for pitch canker infected Año Nuevo stands of Monterey pine. Forest Ecology and Management 308, 101-115. http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S037811271300474X

Jones RC, Steane DA, Lavery M, Vaillancourt RE and Potts BM (2013) Multiple evolutionary processes drive the patterns of genetic differentiation in a forest tree species complex. Ecology and Evolution 3, 1-17. http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ece3.421

Beh MM, Metz MR, Frangioso KM and Rizzo DM (2012) The key host for an invasive forest pathogen also facilitates the pathogen’s survival of wildfire in California forests. New Phytologist 196, 1145-1154. http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1469-8137.2012.04352.x

Jones RC, Steane DA, Lavery M, Vaillancourt RE and Potts BM (2012) Multiple evolutionary processes drive the patterns of genetic differentiation in a forest tree species complex. Ecology and Evolution, n/a-n/a. http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ece3.421

Metz MR, Frangioso KM, Wickland AC, Meentemeyer RK and Rizzo DM (2012) An emergent disease causes directional changes in forest species composition in coastal California. Ecosphere 3, 1-23. http://dx.doi.org/10.1890/ES12-00107.1

 

 

References 1901-2013 (and links to abstracts):
[Number of papers mentioning Quercus parvula: 21; Any undated papers have been included at the end]

 

Beh MM, Metz MR, Frangioso KM and Rizzo DM (2012) The key host for an invasive forest pathogen also facilitates the pathogen’s survival of wildfire in California forests. New Phytologist 196, 1145-54. http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1469-8137.2012.04352.x

Jones RC, Steane DA, Lavery M, Vaillancourt RE and Potts BM (2012) Multiple evolutionary processes drive the patterns of genetic differentiation in a forest tree species complex. Ecology and Evolution, n/a-n/a. http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ece3.421

Moran EV, Willis J and Clark JS (2012) Genetic evidence for hybridization in red oaks (Quercus sect. Lobatae, Fagaceae). Am. J. Botany 99, 92-100. http://www.amjbot.org/cgi/content/abstract/99/1/92

Kovacs K, Václavík T, Haight RG, Pang A, Cunniffe NJ, Gilligan CA and Meentemeyer RK (2011) Predicting the economic costs and property value losses attributed to sudden oak death damage in California (2010–2020). Journal of Environmental Management 92, 1292-302. http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0301479710004627

Lamsal S, Cobb RC, Hall Cushman J, Meng Q, Rizzo DM and Meentemeyer RK (2011) Spatial estimation of the density and carbon content of host populations for Phytophthora ramorum in California and Oregon. Forest Ecology and Management 262, 989-98. http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0378112711003203

Davis FW, Borchert M, Meentemeyer RK, Flint A and Rizzo DM (2010) Pre-impact forest composition and ongoing tree mortality associated with sudden oak death in the Big Sur region; California. Forest Ecology and Management 259, 2342-54. http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0378112710001532

Gilbert GS, Howard E, Ayala-Orozco B, Bonilla-Moheno M, Cummings J, Langridge S, Parker IM, Pasari J, Schweizer D and Swope S (2010) Beyond the tropics: forest structure in a temperate forest mapped plot. Journal of Vegetation Science 21, 388-405. http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1654-1103.2009.01151.x

McPherson BA, Erbilgin N, Wood DL, Svihra P, Storer AJ and Standiford RB (2008) Attraction of ambrosia and bark beetles to coast live oaks infected by Phytophthora ramorum. Agricultural and Forest Entomology 10, 315-21. http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1461-9563.2008.00386.x

Condeso TE and Meentemeyer RK (2007) Effects of landscape heterogeneity on the emerging forest disease sudden oak death. Journal of Ecology 95, 364-75. http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1365-2745.2006.01206.x

Kelly M, Guo Q, Liu D and Shaari D (2007) Modeling the risk for a new invasive forest disease in the United States: An evaluation of five environmental niche models. Computers, Environment and Urban Systems 31, 689-710. http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0198971506000913

Kluza DA, Vieglais DA, Andreasen JK and Peterson AT (2007) Sudden oak death: geographic risk estimates and predictions of origins. Plant Pathology 56, 580-7. http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1365-3059.2007.01602.x

Grivet D, Deguilloux M-F, Petit RJ and Sork VL (2006) Contrasting patterns of historical colonization in white oaks (Quercus spp.) in California and Europe. Molecular Ecology 15, 4085-93. http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1365-294X.2006.03083.x

Anonymous (2005) Appendix - Common and scientific names for plants, vertebrates, and selected invertebrates. In ‘Rivers of North America’. (Ed.^(Eds Arthur CB and Colbert EC) pp. 1105-34. (Academic Press: Burlington). http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/B9780120882533500286

Dodd RS, Hüberli D, Douhovnikoff V, Harnik TY, Afzal-Rafii Z and Garbelotto M (2005) Is variation in susceptibility to Phytophthora ramorum correlated with population genetic structure in coast live oak (Quercus agrifolia)? New Phytologist 165, 203-14. http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1469-8137.2004.01200.x

Piirto DD and Valkonen S (2005) Structure and development of pitch canker infected Monterey pine stands at Año Nuevo, California. Forest Ecology and Management 213, 160-74. http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0378112705002227

Henricot B and Prior C (2004) Phytophthora ramorum, the cause of sudden oak death or ramorum leaf blight and dieback. Mycologist 18, 151-6. http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0269915X04004148

Ivors KL, Hayden KJ, Bonants PJM, Rizzo DM and Garbelotto M (2004) AFLP and phylogenetic analyses of North American and European populations of Phytophthora ramorum. Mycological Research 108, 378-92. http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0953756208615609

Meentemeyer R, Rizzo D, Mark W and Lotz E (2004) Mapping the risk of establishment and spread of sudden oak death in California. Forest Ecology and Management 200, 195-214. http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0378112704004463

Dodd RS and Kashani N (2003) Molecular differentiation and diversity among the California red oaks (Fagaceae; Quercus section Lobatae). Theor Appl Genet 107, 884-92.

Kelly NM and Tuxen K (2003) WebGIS for Monitoring “Sudden Oak Death” in coastal California. Computers, Environment and Urban Systems 27, 527-47. http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0198971502000650

Rizzo DM, Garbelotto M, Davidson JM, Slaughter GW and Koike ST (2002) Phytophthora ramorum as the cause of extensive mortality of Quercus spp. and Lithocarpus densiflorus in California. Plant disease. 86, 205-14.

Davis FW, Borchert M, Meentemeyer RK, Flint A and Rizzo DM Pre-impact forest composition and ongoing tree mortality associated with sudden oak death in the Big Sur region; California. Forest Ecology and Management 259, 2342-54. http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0378112710001532

Gilbert GS, Howard E, Ayala-Orozco B, Bonilla-Moheno M, Cummings J, Langridge S, Parker IM, Pasari J, Schweizer D and Swope S Beyond the tropics: forest structure in a temperate forest mapped plot. Journal of Vegetation Science 21, 388-405. http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1654-1103.2009.01151.x

Gilbert GS, Howard E, Ayala-Orozco Br, Bonilla-Moheno M, Cummings J, Langridge S, Parker IM, Pasari J, Schweizer D and Swope S Beyond the tropics: forest structure in a temperate forest mapped plot. Journal of vegetation science. 21, 388-405. http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1654-1103.2009.01151.x

Kovacs K, VÁclavÍk TÅ, Haight RG, Pang A, Cunniffe NJ, Gilligan CA and Meentemeyer RK Predicting the economic costs and property value losses attributed to sudden oak death damage in California (2010–2020). Journal of Environmental Management 92, 1292-302. http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0301479710004627

Lamsal S, Cobb RC, Hall Cushman J, Meng Q, Rizzo DM and Meentemeyer RK Spatial estimation of the density and carbon content of host populations for Phytophthora ramorum in California and Oregon. Forest Ecology and Management 262, 989-98. http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0378112711003203

Moran EV, Willis J and Clark JS Genetic evidence for hybridization in red oaks (Quercus sect. Lobatae, Fagaceae). Am. J. Botany 99, 92-100. http://www.amjbot.org/cgi/content/abstract/99/1/92

 


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Grateful acknowledgment is made to the following: for plant names: Australian Plant Name Index, Australian National Herbarium http://www.anbg.gov.au/cpbr/databases/apni-search-full.html; ; The International Plant Names Index, Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew/Harvard University Herbaria/Australian National Herbarium http://www.ipni.org/index.html; Plants Database, United States Department of Agriculture, National Resources Conservation Service http://plants.usda.gov/;DJ Mabberley (1997) The Plant Book, Cambridge University Press (Second Edition); JH Wiersma and B Leon (1999) World Economic Plants, CRC Press; RJ Hnatiuk (1990) Census of Australian Vascular Plants, Australian Government Publishing Service; for information: Science Direct http://www.sciencedirect.com/; Wiley Online Library http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/advanced/search; High Wire http://highwire.stanford.edu/cgi/search; Oxford Journals http://services.oxfordjournals.org/search.dtl; USDA National Agricultural Library http://agricola.nal.usda.gov/booleancube/booleancube_search_cit.html; for synonyms: The Plant List http://www.theplantlist.org/; for common names: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page; etc.


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