Australian New Crops Info 2016
Supported by the Rural Industries Research and Development Corporation

Listing of Interesting Plants of the World:

Quercus prinoides

 

 

This species is usually known as:

Quercus prinoides

 

This species has also been known as:

Quercus prinoides var. acuminata, Quercus prinoides f. alexanderi, Quercus prinoides var. prinoides, Quercus prinoides var. rufescens, Quercus prinoides f. rufescens

 

Common names:

Dwarf Chinkapin Oak, Dwarf Chinquapin Oak, Dwarf Chestnut Oak, Scrub Chestnut Oak

 

 

Trends (five databases) 1901-2013:
[Number of papers mentioning Quercus prinoides: 27]

 

 

Popularity of Quercus prinoides over time
[Left-hand Plot: Plot of numbers of papers mentioning Quercus prinoides (histogram and left hand axis scale of left-hand plot) and line of best fit, 1901 to 2013 (equation and % variation accounted for in box); Right-hand Plot: Plot of a proportional micro index, derived from numbers of papers mentioning Quercus prinoides as a proportion (scaled by multiplying by one million) of the approximate total number of papers available in databases for that year (frequency polygon and left-hand axis scale of right-hand plot) and line of best fit, 1901 to 2013 (equation and % variation accounted for in box)] 

[For larger charts showing the numbers of papers that have mentioned this species over years, select this link; there are links to come back from there]

 

Keywords

[Total number of keywords included in the papers that mentioned this species: 120]

 

New England (3), Quercus (3), vegetation (3), Albany Pine Bush (2), barrens (2), Charcoal (2), composition (2), Deciduous forest (2), early succession (2), Forest herb (2), heathlands (2), Iron furnace (2), management (2), Massachusetts (2), northeast US (2), Quercus ilicifolia (2), sandplain grassland (2), shrubland (2), Spatial structure (2), species richness (2), Succession (2), 137Cs (1), buds (1), Buffalo National River (1), Canonical correspondence analysis (1), Cape Cod (1), Carex pensylvanica (1), CCA (1), chronosequence (1), clearcut logging (1), climate change (1), coastal dunes (1), coastal oak forest (1), coastal sandplain (1), Comptonia peregrina (1), conservation and management (1), Conservation biology (1), DCA (1), development time (1), Disturbance history (1), dune stability (1), Environmental characteristics (1), exotic pest (1), Exotic species (1), fire (1), Fire Gradient analyses (1), forest disturbance (1), forest ecology (1), frost injury (1), frost resistance (1), Gaylussacia baccata (1), height (1), hybrids (1), intergeneric hybridization (1), laboratory assay (1), Land use history (1), Landscape (1), land-use (1), leaves (1), Lepidoptera (1), Michigan (1), microclimate (1), northern Italy (1), oak (1), oak lace bug (1), Ordination (1), Ozarks (1), patterns (1), phenology (1), Pine barrens (1), pine–oak woodland (1), Pinus rigida (1), pitch pine (1), Plant biogeography (1), plant characteristics (1), Plant community ecology (1), plants (1), Prescribed burning (1), Quercus macrocarpa (1), quercus macrocarpa x quercus prinoides (1), quercus prinoides (1), Redundancy analysis (1), Restoration (1), Riparian zone (1), Sandplain shrubland (1), sandy soils (1), Schizachyrium scoparium (1), seasonal variation (1), shrublands (1), soil (1), soils (1), Spatial scale (1), temperature profiles (1), Vaccinium angustifolium (1), vaccinium pallidum (1), vegetation dynamics (1)

 

[If all keywords are not here (as indicated by .....), they can be accessed from this link; there are links to come back from there]

 

 

Most likely scope for crop use/product (%):
[Please note: When there are only a few papers mentioning a species, care should be taken with the interpretation of these crop use/product results; as well, a mention may relate to the use of a species, or the context in which it grows, rather than a product]

 

boundary (17.67), timber (17.51), ornamental (14.69), honey (6.12), medicinal (5.83), wastewater treatment (5.27), resin (4.61), shade (4.07), cereal (1.98), starch (1.92)…..

 

[To see the full list of crop use/product outcomes, from searching abstracts of the papers that have mentioned this species, select this link; details of the analysis process have also been included; there are links to come back from there]

 

 

Recent mentions of this species in the literature:
[since 2012, with links to abstracts; The references from 1901-2013 which have been used for the trend, keyword and crop use/product analyses below, are listed below these references]

 

Fahey RT (2016) Variation in responsiveness of woody plant leaf out phenology to anomalous spring onset. Ecosphere 7, n/a-n/a. http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ecs2.1209

Bried JT, Patterson WA and Gifford NA (2014) Why Pine Barrens Restoration Should Favor Barrens Over Pine. Restoration Ecology 22, 442-446. http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/rec.12097

Bried JT, Jog SK and Matthews JW (2013) Floristic quality assessment signals human disturbance over natural variability in a wetland system. Ecological Indicators 34, 260-267. http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1470160X13002173

Bried JT and Dillon AM (2012) Bee diversity in scrub oak patches 2 years after mow and herbicide treatment. Insect Conservation and Diversity 5, 237-243. http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1752-4598.2011.00154.x

Hougen KE and Matlack GR (2012) Long-term effects in vegetation and soils at two 19th century iron furnace sites in southeastern Ohio, USA. Forest Ecology and Management 269, 279-292. http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0378112712000047

 

 

References 1901-2013 (and links to abstracts):
[Number of papers mentioning Quercus prinoides: 27; Any undated papers have been included at the end]

 

Bried JT and Dillon AM (2012) Bee diversity in scrub oak patches 2 years after mow and herbicide treatment. Insect Conservation and Diversity 5, 237-43. http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1752-4598.2011.00154.x

Hougen KE and Matlack GR (2012) Long-term effects in vegetation and soils at two 19th century iron furnace sites in southeastern Ohio, USA. Forest Ecology and Management 269, 279-92. http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0378112712000047

Kirchoff BK, Leggett R, Her V, Moua C, Morrison J and Poole C (2011) Principles of visual key construction-with a visual identification key to the Fagaceae of the southeastern United States. AoB Plants 2011, plr005-. http://aobpla.oxfordjournals.org/cgi/content/abstract/2011/0/plr005

Wilks B (2011) Marine Streets—A Living Marine Edge. Ecological Rest. 29, 292-7. http://er.uwpress.org

Clarke GL and Patterson Iii WA (2007) The distribution of disturbance-dependent rare plants in a coastal Massachusetts sandplain: Implications for conservation and management. Biological Conservation 136, 4-16. http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0006320706004769

Neill C, Von Holle B, Kleese K, Ivy KD, Colllins AR, Treat C and Dean M (2007) Historical influences on the vegetation and soils of the Martha’s Vineyard, Massachusetts coastal sandplain: Implications for conservation and restoration. Biological Conservation 136, 17-32. http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0006320706004800

Bernardinelli I (2006) Potential host plants of Corythucha arcuata (Het., Tingidae) in Europe: a laboratory study. Journal of Applied Entomology 130, 480-4. http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1439-0418.2006.01098.x

Lezberg AL, Buresch K, Neill C and Chase T (2006) Mechanical Land Clearing to Promote Establishment of Coastal Sandplain Grassland and Shrubland Communities. Restoration Ecology 14, 220-32. http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1526-100X.2006.00124.x

Grand J and Mello MJ (2004) A multi-scale analysis of species–environment relationships: rare moths in a pitch pine–scrub oak (Pinus rigida–Quercus ilicifolia) community. Biological Conservation 119, 495-506. http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0006320704000151

Von Holle B and Simberloff D (2004) Testing Fox’s assembly rule: does plant invasion depend on recipient community structure? Oikos 105, 551-63. http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.0030-1299.2004.12597.x

Motzkin G, Ciccarello SC and Foster DR (2002) Frost pockets on a level sand plain: dose variation in microclimate help maintain persistent vegetation patterns? Journal of the Torrey Botanical Society. 129, 154-63.

Motzkin G, Eberhardt R, Hall B, Foster DR, Harrod J and MacDonald D (2002) Vegetation variation across Cape Cod, Massachusetts: environmental and historical determinants. Journal of Biogeography 29, 1439-54. http://dx.doi.org/10.1046/j.1365-2699.2002.00800.x

Dvorin DJ, Lee JJ, Belecanech GA, Goldstein MF and Dunsky EH (2001) A comparative, volumetric survey of airborne pollen in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (1991–1997) and Cherry Hill, New Jersey (1995–1997). Annals of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology 87, 394-404. http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1081120610629213

Vanden Bygaart AJ and Protz R (2001) Bomb-fallout 137Cs as a marker of geomorphic stability in dune sands and soils, Pinery Provincial Park, Ontario, Canada. Earth Surface Processes and Landforms 26, 689-700. http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/esp.215

Blake JG and Schuette B (2000) Restoration of an oak forest in east-central Missouri: Early effects of prescribed burning on woody vegetation. Forest Ecology and Management 139, 109-26. http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0378112799003382

Sagers CL and Lyon J (1997) Gradient analysis in a riparian landscape: contrasts among forest layers. Forest Ecology and Management 96, 13-26. http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0378112797000509

Drayton B and Primack RB (1996) Plant Species Lost in an Isolated Conservation Area in Metropolitan Boston from 1894 to 1993

La pérdida de especies de plantas desde 1894 a 1993 en un área de conservación aislada dentro de la zona metropolitana de Boston. Conservation Biology 10, 30-9. http://dx.doi.org/10.1046/j.1523-1739.1996.10010030.x

Jarvis DI, Leopold EB and Liu Y (1992) Distinguishing the pollen of deciduous oaks, evergreen oaks, and certain rosaceous species of southwestern Sichuan Province, China. Review of Palaeobotany and Palynology 75, 259-71. http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/003466679290019D

Gaynor BD (1987) Hybridization in Michigan white oaks (Quercus subg. Lepidobalanus) with emphasis on two new hybrids. Michigan botanist. 26, 63-77.

Anonymous (1984) Index to taxa and terms. Review of Palaeobotany and Palynology 42, 365-9. http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/003466678490068X

Van Benthem F, Clarke GCS and Punt W (1984) Fagaceae. Review of Palaeobotany and Palynology 42, 87-110. http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/0034666784900630

Wolgast LJ (1979) Acorn yield in a mixed stand of bear oak and dwarf chinkapin oak. Wildlife Society bulletin. 7, 176-7.

Anonymous (1971) References. Review of Palaeobotany and Palynology 12, 7-188. http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0034666771800015

Stanley EA and Kremp GOW (1959) Some observations on the geniculus in the pollen of Quercus prinoides. Micropaleontology 5, 351-4. http://micropal.geoscienceworld.org/cgi/content/abstract/5/3/351

Wall ME, Fenske CS, Garvin JW, Willaman JJ, Jones Q, Schubert BG and Gentry HS (1959) Steroidal sapogenins LV. Survey of plants for steroidal sapogenins and other constituents. Journal of the American Pharmaceutical Association 48, 695-722. http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/jps.3030481206

Harshberger JW (1925) THE DIFFERENTIALS EFFECTIVE IN THE DISTRIBUTION OF PLANTS IN THE COASTAL PLAIN. Science 61, 529-31. http://www.sciencemag.org

Webber HJ (1905) THE BOTANICAL SOCIETY OF WASHINGTON. Science 22, 14-a-6. http://www.sciencemag.org

Bried JT and Dillon AM Bee diversity in scrub oak patches 2 years after mow and herbicide treatment. Insect Conservation and Diversity, no-no. http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1752-4598.2011.00154.x

Hougen KE and Matlack GR Long-term effects in vegetation and soils at two 19th century iron furnace sites in southeastern Ohio, USA. Forest Ecology and Management 269, 279-92. http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0378112712000047

Wilks B Marine Streets—A Living Marine Edge. Ecological Rest. 29, 292-7. http://er.uwpress.org

 


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Grateful acknowledgment is made to the following: for plant names: Australian Plant Name Index, Australian National Herbarium http://www.anbg.gov.au/cpbr/databases/apni-search-full.html; ; The International Plant Names Index, Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew/Harvard University Herbaria/Australian National Herbarium http://www.ipni.org/index.html; Plants Database, United States Department of Agriculture, National Resources Conservation Service http://plants.usda.gov/;DJ Mabberley (1997) The Plant Book, Cambridge University Press (Second Edition); JH Wiersma and B Leon (1999) World Economic Plants, CRC Press; RJ Hnatiuk (1990) Census of Australian Vascular Plants, Australian Government Publishing Service; for information: Science Direct http://www.sciencedirect.com/; Wiley Online Library http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/advanced/search; High Wire http://highwire.stanford.edu/cgi/search; Oxford Journals http://services.oxfordjournals.org/search.dtl; USDA National Agricultural Library http://agricola.nal.usda.gov/booleancube/booleancube_search_cit.html; for synonyms: The Plant List http://www.theplantlist.org/; for common names: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page; etc.


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