Australian New Crops Info 2016
Supported by the Rural Industries Research and Development Corporation

Listing of Interesting Plants of the World:

Quercus pumila

 

 

This species is usually known as:

Quercus pumila

 

This species has also been known as:

Quercus pumila var. sericea

 

Common names:

Running Oak, Runner Oak

 

 

Trends (five databases) 1901-2013:
[Number of papers mentioning Quercus pumila: 18]

 

 

Popularity of Quercus pumila over time
[Left-hand Plot: Plot of numbers of papers mentioning Quercus pumila (histogram and left hand axis scale of left-hand plot) and line of best fit, 1901 to 2013 (equation and % variation accounted for in box); Right-hand Plot: Plot of a proportional micro index, derived from numbers of papers mentioning Quercus pumila as a proportion (scaled by multiplying by one million) of the approximate total number of papers available in databases for that year (frequency polygon and left-hand axis scale of right-hand plot) and line of best fit, 1901 to 2013 (equation and % variation accounted for in box)] 

[For larger charts showing the numbers of papers that have mentioned this species over years, select this link; there are links to come back from there]

 

Keywords

[Total number of keywords included in the papers that mentioned this species: 125]

 

×&#xa0 (4), Fertilization (3), Genotype&#xa0 (3), Silviculture (3), hexazinone (2), imazapyr (2), Longleaf pine (2), restoration (2), shrub control (2), sulfometuron methyl (2), understory (2), Wiregrass (2), Aboveground biomass (1), Aristida stricta Michx. (1), Boyd Tract (1), Canopy disturbance (1), Competition (1), Competition control (1), Density (1), E (1), ecohydrology (1), Edge effect (1), Endangered species (1), environment (1), Even-aged stands (1), everglades (1), Family (1), Fire ecology (1), flood-intolerant vegetation (1), flora (1), foliar nutrients (1), food plants (1), Forest reproduction method (1), forestry (1), freezing-induced embolism (1), Fuel model (1), G&#xa0 (1), Genotype (1), geographical distribution (1), Group selection (1), Group selection silvicultural system (1), Growth declines (1), Growth efficiency (1), hardwood hammocks (1), Herbicide (1), Hurricane ecology (1), Hydraulic conductance (1), Ilex glabra (L) A. Gray (1), Leaf area development (1), Light interception (1), location (1), Mechanical thinning (1), Natural disturbance (1), nitrogen (1), Nutrition (1), Old-growth forest (1), phosphorus (1), pine rocklands (1), Pinus elliottii (1), Pinus palustris ecosystem (1), Pinus palustris Mill. (1), Pinus taeda (1), potassium (1), Prescribed fire (1), Quercus (1), Quercus alba (1), quercus aquatica (1), quercus elliottii (1), Quercus falcata (1), quercus humilis (1), Quercus laevis (1), Quercus leucotrichophora (1), quercus lyrata (1), Quercus marilandica (1), quercus michauxii (1), Quercus montana (1), Quercus nigra (1), Quercus phellos (1), quercus pumila (1), Quercus rubra (1), quercus sempervirens (1), quercus sinuata (1), Quercus stellata (1), quercus villosa (1), Quercus virginiana (1), Red-cockaded woodpecker (1), Regeneration (1), Resin flow (1), soil moisture (1), South Carolina (1), Sporobolus curtissii (Vasey) Small ex Scribn. (1), stable isotopes (1), Stand structure (1), synonyms (1), taxonomy (1), terminology (1), U.S. Coastal Plain (1), Uneven-aged (1), Vaccinium myrsinites Lam. flatwoods (1), Vegetation control (1), vessel diameters (1), vulnerability to cavitation (1), Wade Tract (1), water sources (1), Weed control (1), Wildfire intensity (1), wildlife (1), woody plants (1)

 

[If all keywords are not here (as indicated by .....), they can be accessed from this link; there are links to come back from there]

 

 

Most likely scope for crop use/product (%):
[Please note: When there are only a few papers mentioning a species, care should be taken with the interpretation of these crop use/product results; as well, a mention may relate to the use of a species, or the context in which it grows, rather than a product]

 

green manure (43.31), resin (23.28), cane/bamboo (13.25), timber (11.77), medicinal (1.19), fruit (0.86), poison (0.86), ornamental (0.55), starch (0.39), cereal (0.28)…..

 

[To see the full list of crop use/product outcomes, from searching abstracts of the papers that have mentioned this species, select this link; details of the analysis process have also been included; there are links to come back from there]

 

 

Recent mentions of this species in the literature:
[since 2012, with links to abstracts; The references from 1901-2013 which have been used for the trend, keyword and crop use/product analyses below, are listed below these references]

 

Diamond JM and Heinen JT (2016) Conserving rare plants in locally-protected urban forest fragments: A case study from Miami-Dade County, Florida. Urban Forestry & Urban Greening 20, 1-11. http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1618866716301601

Tschinkel WR and King JR (2016) Ant community and habitat limit colony establishment by the fire ant, Solenopsis invicta. Functional Ecology, n/a-n/a. http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/1365-2435.12794

Fill JM, Platt WJ, Welch SM, Waldron JL and Mousseau TA (2015) Updating models for restoration and management of fiery ecosystems. Forest Ecology and Management 356, 54-63. http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0378112715004028

 

 

References 1901-2013 (and links to abstracts):
[Number of papers mentioning Quercus pumila: 18; Any undated papers have been included at the end]

 

Bohn KK, Minogue PJ and Pieterson EC (2011) Control of Invasive Japanese Climbing Fern (Lygodium japonicum) and Response of Native Ground Cover During Restoration of a Disturbed Longleaf Pine Ecosystem. Ecological Rest. 29, 346-56. http://er.uwpress.org/cgi/content/abstract/29/4/346

Jose S, Ranasinghe S and Ramsey CL (2010) Longleaf Pine (Pinus palustris P. Mill.) Restoration Using Herbicides: Overstory and Understory Vegetation Responses on a Coastal Plain Flatwoods Site in Florida, U.S.A. Restoration Ecology 18, 244-51. http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1526-100X.2008.00440.x

Saha AK, Lobo O’Reilly Sternberg LdS and Miralles-Wilhelm F (2009) Linking water sources with foliar nutrient status in upland plant communities in the Everglades National Park, USA. Ecohydrology 2, 42-54. http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/eco.38

Roth BE, Jokela EJ, Martin TA, Huber DA and White TL (2007) Genotype × environment interactions in selected loblolly and slash pine plantations in the Southeastern United States. Forest Ecology and Management 238, 175-88. http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0378112706010462

Gilliam FS, Platt WJ and Peet RK (2006) Natural disturbances and the physiognomy of pine savannas: A phenomenological model. Applied Vegetation Science 9, 83-96. http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1654-109X.2006.tb00658.x

Gagnon JL, Jokela EJ, Moser WK and Huber DA (2004) Characteristics of gaps and natural regeneration in mature longleaf pine flatwoods ecosystems. Forest Ecology and Management 187, 373-80. http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0378112703003785

Martin TA and Jokela EJ (2004) Stand development and production dynamics of loblolly pine under a range of cultural treatments in north-central Florida USA. Forest Ecology and Management 192, 39-58. http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0378112704000143

Gagnon JL, Jokela EJ, Moser WK and Huber DA (2003) Dynamics of artificial regeneration in gaps within a longleaf pine flatwoods ecosystem. Forest Ecology and Management 172, 133-44. http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0378112701008088

Brose P and Wade D (2002) Potential fire behavior in pine flatwood forests following three different fuel reduction techniques. Forest Ecology and Management 163, 71-84. http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S037811270100528X

Wilbur RL (2002) Thomas Walter’s oaks from the coastal region of South Carolina. Rhodora. 104, 134-50.

Cavender-Bares J and Holbrook NM (2001) Hydraulic properties and freezing-induced cavitation in sympatric evergreen and deciduous oaks with contrasting habitats. Plant, Cell & Environment 24, 1243-56. http://dx.doi.org/10.1046/j.1365-3040.2001.00797.x

Brockway DG and Lewis CE (1997) Long-term effects of dormant-season prescribed fire on plant community diversity, structure and productivity in a longleaf pine wiregrass ecosystem. Forest Ecology and Management 96, 167-83. http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0378112796039394

Ross WG, Kulhavy DL and Conner RN (1997) Stand conditions and tree characteristics affect quality of longleaf pine for red-cockaded woodpecker cavity trees. Forest Ecology and Management 91, 145-54. http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0378112796038947

Gove JH, Patil GP, Swindel BF and Taillie C (1994) 12 Ecological diversity and forest management. In ‘Handbook of Statistics’. (Ed.^(Eds Patil GP and Rao CR) pp. 409-62. (Elsevier). http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0169716105800148

Williams LE, Jr. and Station USSFE (1977) Running oak Quercus pumila Walt.  16, 16.

Colvin TR (1976) N, P and K fertilization of running oak to stimulate mast production. 656-9.

Wall ME, Fenske CS, Garvin JW, Willaman JJ, Jones Q, Schubert BG and Gentry HS (1959) Steroidal sapogenins LV. Survey of plants for steroidal sapogenins and other constituents. Journal of the American Pharmaceutical Association 48, 695-722. http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/jps.3030481206

Harper RM (1906) A PHYTOGEOGRAPHICAL SKETCH OF THE ALTAMAHA GRIT REGION OF THE COASTAL PLAIN OF GEORGIA. Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences 17, 1-414. http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1749-6632.1906.tb56903.x

Bohn KK, Minogue PJ and Pieterson EC Control of Invasive Japanese Climbing Fern (Lygodium japonicum) and Response of Native Ground Cover During Restoration of a Disturbed Longleaf Pine Ecosystem. Ecological Rest. 29, 346-56. http://er.uwpress.org/cgi/content/abstract/29/4/346

Jose S, Ranasinghe S and Ramsey CL Longleaf Pine (Pinus palustris P. Mill.) Restoration Using Herbicides: Overstory and Understory Vegetation Responses on a Coastal Plain Flatwoods Site in Florida, U.S.A. Restoration Ecology 18, 244-51. http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1526-100X.2008.00440.x

 


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Grateful acknowledgment is made to the following: for plant names: Australian Plant Name Index, Australian National Herbarium http://www.anbg.gov.au/cpbr/databases/apni-search-full.html; ; The International Plant Names Index, Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew/Harvard University Herbaria/Australian National Herbarium http://www.ipni.org/index.html; Plants Database, United States Department of Agriculture, National Resources Conservation Service http://plants.usda.gov/;DJ Mabberley (1997) The Plant Book, Cambridge University Press (Second Edition); JH Wiersma and B Leon (1999) World Economic Plants, CRC Press; RJ Hnatiuk (1990) Census of Australian Vascular Plants, Australian Government Publishing Service; for information: Science Direct http://www.sciencedirect.com/; Wiley Online Library http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/advanced/search; High Wire http://highwire.stanford.edu/cgi/search; Oxford Journals http://services.oxfordjournals.org/search.dtl; USDA National Agricultural Library http://agricola.nal.usda.gov/booleancube/booleancube_search_cit.html; for synonyms: The Plant List http://www.theplantlist.org/; for common names: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page; etc.


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Latest update March 2017 by: ANCW