Australian New Crops Info 2016
Supported by the Rural Industries Research and Development Corporation

Listing of Interesting Plants of the World:

Quercus wislizeni

 

 

This species is usually known as:

Quercus wislizeni, Quercus wislizeni var. frutescens

 

This species has also been known as:

Quercus wislizeni f. extima, Quercus wislizeni var. extima, Quercus wislizeni subsp. frutescens, Quercus wislizeni f. parvula, Quercus wislizeni var. wislizeni

 

Common names:

Interior Live Oak, Sierra Live Oak

 

 

Trends (five databases) 1901-2013:
[Number of papers mentioning Quercus wislizeni: 56]

 

 

Popularity of Quercus wislizeni over time
[Left-hand Plot: Plot of numbers of papers mentioning Quercus wislizeni (histogram and left hand axis scale of left-hand plot) and line of best fit, 1901 to 2013 (equation and % variation accounted for in box); Right-hand Plot: Plot of a proportional micro index, derived from numbers of papers mentioning Quercus wislizeni as a proportion (scaled by multiplying by one million) of the approximate total number of papers available in databases for that year (frequency polygon and left-hand axis scale of right-hand plot) and line of best fit, 1901 to 2013 (equation and % variation accounted for in box)] 

[For larger charts showing the numbers of papers that have mentioned this species over years, select this link; there are links to come back from there]

 

Keywords

[Total number of keywords included in the papers that mentioned this species: 455]

 

Quercus wislizeni (20), California (17), Quercus douglasii (11), Quercus agrifolia (7), Internet resource (5), Pinus sabiniana (4), acorns (3), Ascomycota (3), climate change (3), drought (3), forage (3), host preference (3), hybridization (3), hypogeous fungi (3), phylogeny (3), Pinus (3), rangelands (3), beef cattle (2), biodiversity (2), biogeography (2), botanical composition (2), canopy (2), Carbon loads (2), <ARROW chemotaxonomy (2), disease risk spread (2), ectomycorrhizal fungal communities (2), foliar necrosis (2), General circulation model (2), Genetic adaptation (2), Growth and yield (2), growth rate (2), hazel (2), height (2), hornbeam (2), internal transcribed spacer DNA sequence (2), internal transcribed spacers (2), invasive biology (2), ITS rDNA (2), ITS sequencing (2), larvae (2), life cycle (organisms) (2), nitrate nitrogen (2), oak woodland (2), oomycete (2), pastures (2), Pezizales (2), Phytophthora ramorum (2), plant characteristics (2), plant communities (2), plant ecology (2), plant–pathogen interaction (2), Quercus (2), Quercus douglasii (blue oak) (2), Quercus lobata (2), Quercus wislizeni (interior live oak) (2), resistance (2), seasonal variation (2), Site index (2), soil organic matter (2), soil properties (2), Species composition (2), Stand dynamics (2), streams (2), Tuber (2), Tuber aestivum (2), Tuber orchard (2), water stress (2), watersheds (2), wet season (2), wood decay (2), woodlandDOWN> grasslands (2), woodlands (2), xylem (2),  amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) (1), alleles (1), ammonium nitrogen (1), anatomy and morphology (1), annual grasslands (1), Anon. (1993) for conifers (1), Arctostaphylos (1), Arctostaphylos patula (1), arctostaphylos viscida (1), avatars (1), basal sprouting (1), biological development (1), biomass production (1), bog oak (1), Braun-Blanquet approach (1), Bromus (1), bulk density (1), Burden (1), California black oak (1)…..

 

[If all keywords are not here (as indicated by .....), they can be accessed from this link; there are links to come back from there]

 

 

Most likely scope for crop use/product (%):
[Please note: When there are only a few papers mentioning a species, care should be taken with the interpretation of these crop use/product results; as well, a mention may relate to the use of a species, or the context in which it grows, rather than a product]

 

timber (74.13), ornamental (4.26), beverage (3.82), medicinal (2.68), poison (1.94), weed (1.48), starch (0.89), cereal (0.63), nutraceutical (0.62), grain legume (0.62)…..

 

[To see the full list of crop use/product outcomes, from searching abstracts of the papers that have mentioned this species, select this link; details of the analysis process have also been included; there are links to come back from there]

 

 

Recent mentions of this species in the literature:
[since 2012, with links to abstracts; The references from 1901-2013 which have been used for the trend, keyword and crop use/product analyses below, are listed below these references]

 

Krofcheck DJ, Hurteau MD, Scheller RM and Loudermilk EL (2017) Restoring surface fire stabilizes forest carbon under extreme fire weather in the Sierra Nevada. Ecosphere 8, n/a-n/a. http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ecs2.1663

Peguero-Pina JJ, Sisó S, Flexas J, Galmés J, García-Nogales A, Niinemets Ü, Sancho-Knapik D, Saz MÁ and Gil-Pelegrín E (2017) Cell-level anatomical characteristics explain high mesophyll conductance and photosynthetic capacity in sclerophyllous Mediterranean oaks. New Phytologist, n/a-n/a. http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/nph.14406

Bonal R, Espelta JM, Muñoz A, Ortego J, Aparicio JM, Gaddis K and Sork VL (2016) Diversity in insect seed parasite guilds at large geographical scale: the roles of host specificity and spatial distance. Journal of Biogeography 43, 1620-1630. http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/jbi.12733

Casas Á, García M, Siegel RB, Koltunov A, Ramírez C and Ustin S (2016) Burned forest characterization at single-tree level with airborne laser scanning for assessing wildlife habitat. Remote Sensing of Environment 175, 231-241. http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0034425715302662

Chen Y, Dallara PL, Nelson LJ, Coleman TW, Hishinuma SM, Carrillo D and Seybold SJ (2016) Comparative morphometric and chemical analyses of phenotypes of 2 invasive ambrosia beetles (Euwallacea spp.) in the United States. Insect Science, n/a-n/a. http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/1744-7917.12329

Gwenzi D, Lefsky MA, Suchdeo VP and Harding DJ (2016) Prospects of the ICESat-2 laser altimetry mission for savanna ecosystem structural studies based on airborne simulation data. ISPRS Journal of Photogrammetry and Remote Sensing 118, 68-82. http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0924271616300491

Jacobsen AL, Tobin MF, Toschi HS, Percolla MI and Pratt RB (2016) Structural determinants of increased susceptibility to dehydration-induced cavitation in post-fire resprouting chaparral shrubs. Plant, Cell & Environment 39, 2473-2485. http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/pce.12802

Ricker M, Valencia-Avalos S, Hernández HM, Gómez-Hinostrosa C, Martínez-Salas EM, Alvarado-Cárdenas LO, Wallnöfer B, Ramos CH and Mendoza PE (2016) Tree and tree-like species of Mexico: Apocynaceae, Cactaceae, Ebenaceae, Fagaceae, and Sapotaceae. Revista Mexicana de Biodiversidad 87, 1189-1202. http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1870345316301191

Roth KL, Casas A, Huesca M, Ustin SL, Alsina MM, Mathews SA and Whiting ML (2016) Leaf spectral clusters as potential optical leaf functional types within California ecosystems. Remote Sensing of Environment 184, 229-246. http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0034425716302723

Serra-Diaz JM, Franklin J, Dillon WW, Syphard AD, Davis FW and Meentemeyer RK (2016) California forests show early indications of both range shifts and local persistence under climate change. Global Ecology and Biogeography 25, 164-175. http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/geb.12396

(2015) Subject Index. In Developments in Earth Surface Processes. (Ed.^(Eds John RG and Chris H) pp. 629-649. (Elsevier). http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/B9780444633699000215

Reddy SN (2015) Feeding family and ancestors: Persistence of traditional Native American lifeways during the Mission Period in coastal Southern California. Journal of Anthropological Archaeology 37, 48-66. http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0278416514000920

Sun L, Spencer RGM, Hernes PJ, Dyda RY and Mopper K (2015) A comparison of a simplified cupric oxide oxidation HPLC method with the traditional GC-MS method for characterization of lignin phenolics in environmental samples. Limnology and Oceanography: Methods 13, 1-8. http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/lom3.10001

White T, Brantley S, Banwart S, Chorover J, Dietrich W, Derry L, Lohse K, Anderson S, Aufdendkampe A, Bales R, Kumar P, Richter D and McDowell B (2015) Chapter 2 - The Role of Critical Zone Observatories in Critical Zone Science. In Developments in Earth Surface Processes. (Ed.^(Eds John RG and Chris H) pp. 15-78. (Elsevier). http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/B9780444633699000021

Dolanc CR, Safford HD, Dobrowski SZ and Thorne JH (2014) Twentieth century shifts in abundance and composition of vegetation types of the Sierra Nevada, CA, US. Applied Vegetation Science 17, 442-455. http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/avsc.12079

Dolanc CR, Safford HD, Thorne JH and Dobrowski SZ (2014) Changing forest structure across the landscape of the Sierra Nevada, CA, USA, since the 1930s. Ecosphere 5, 1-26. http://dx.doi.org/10.1890/ES14-00103.1

Hodson AK, Ferris H, Hollander AD and Jackson LE (2014) Nematode food webs associated with native perennial plant species and soil nutrient pools in California riparian oak woodlands. Geoderma 228–229, 182-191. http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0016706113002577

Karlik JF and Chojnacky DC (2014) Biomass and carbon data from blue oaks in a California oak savanna. Biomass and Bioenergy 62, 228-232. http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0961953413004935

Kim H, Bishop JKB, Dietrich WE and Fung IY (2014) Process dominance shift in solute chemistry as revealed by long-term high-frequency water chemistry observations of groundwater flowing through weathered argillite underlying a steep forested hillslope. Geochimica et Cosmochimica Acta 140, 1-19. http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0016703714003408

Link P, Simonin K, Maness H, Oshun J, Dawson T and Fung I (2014) Species differences in the seasonality of evergreen tree transpiration in a Mediterranean climate: Analysis of multiyear, half-hourly sap flow observations. Water Resources Research 50, 1869-1894. http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/2013WR014023

Pearse IS, Cobb RC and Karban R (2014) The phenology–substrate-match hypothesis explains decomposition rates of evergreen and deciduous oak leaves. Journal of Ecology 102, 28-35. http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/1365-2745.12182

Serra-Diaz JM, Franklin J, Ninyerola M, Davis FW, Syphard AD, Regan HM and Ikegami M (2014) Bioclimatic velocity: the pace of species exposure to climate change. Diversity and Distributions 20, 169-180. http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/ddi.12131

Simonin KA, Link P, Rempe D, Miller S, Oshun J, Bode C, Dietrich WE, Fung I and Dawson TE (2014) Vegetation induced changes in the stable isotope composition of near surface humidity. Ecohydrology 7, 936-949. http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/eco.1420

Cheng D, Vigil K, Schanes P, Brown RN and Zhong J (2013) Prevalence and burden of two rickettsial phylotypes (G021 and G022) in Ixodes pacificus from California by real-time quantitative PCR. Ticks and Tick-borne Diseases 4, 280-287. http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1877959X1300023X

Gao C, Shi N-N, Liu Y-X, Peay KG, Zheng Y, Ding Q, Mi X-C, Ma K-P, Wubet T, Buscot F and Guo L-D (2013) Host plant genus-level diversity is the best predictor of ectomycorrhizal fungal diversity in a Chinese subtropical forest. Molecular Ecology 22, 3403-3414. http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/mec.12297

Tobin MF, Pratt RB, Jacobsen AL and De Guzman ME (2013) Xylem vulnerability to cavitation can be accurately characterised in species with long vessels using a centrifuge method. Plant Biology 15, 496-504. http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1438-8677.2012.00678.x

Cullingham CI, James PMA, Cooke JEK and Coltman DW (2012) Characterizing the physical and genetic structure of the lodgepole pine × jack pine hybrid zone: mosaic structure and differential introgression. Evolutionary Applications, n/a-n/a. http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1752-4571.2012.00266.x

Cullingham CI, James PMA, Cooke JEK and Coltman DW (2012) Characterizing the physical and genetic structure of the lodgepole pine × jack pine hybrid zone: mosaic structure and differential introgression. Evolutionary Applications 5, 879-891. http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1752-4571.2012.00266.x

Hüberli D, Hayden KJ, Calver M and Garbelotto M (2012) Intraspecific variation in host susceptibility and climatic factors mediate epidemics of sudden oak death in western US forests. Plant Pathology 61, 579-592. http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1365-3059.2011.02535.x

Salve R, Rempe DM and Dietrich WE (2012) Rain, rock moisture dynamics, and the rapid response of perched groundwater in weathered, fractured argillite underlying a steep hillslope. Water Resources Research 48, W11528. http://dx.doi.org/10.1029/2012WR012583

Tobin MF, Pratt RB, Jacobsen AL and De Guzman ME (2012) Xylem vulnerability to cavitation can be accurately characterised in species with long vessels using a centrifuge method. Plant Biology, n/a-n/a. http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1438-8677.2012.00678.x

 

 

References 1901-2013 (and links to abstracts):
[Number of papers mentioning Quercus wislizeni: 56; Any undated papers have been included at the end]

 

Cullingham CI, James PMA, Cooke JEK and Coltman DW (2012) Characterizing the physical and genetic structure of the lodgepole pine × jack pine hybrid zone: mosaic structure and differential introgression. Evolutionary Applications, n/a-n/a. http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1752-4571.2012.00266.x

Hüberli D, Hayden KJ, Calver M and Garbelotto M (2012) Intraspecific variation in host susceptibility and climatic factors mediate epidemics of sudden oak death in western US forests. Plant Pathology 61, 579-92. http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1365-3059.2011.02535.x

Tobin MF, Pratt RB, Jacobsen AL and De Guzman ME (2012) Xylem vulnerability to cavitation can be accurately characterised in species with long vessels using a centrifuge method. Plant Biology, n/a-n/a. http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1438-8677.2012.00678.x

Benucci GMN, Raggi L, Albertini E, Grebenc T, Bencivenga M, Falcinelli M and Di Massimo G (2011) Ectomycorrhizal communities in a productive Tuber aestivum Vittad. orchard: composition, host influence and species replacement. FEMS Microbiology Ecology 76, 170-84. http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1574-6941.2010.01039.x

Swarowsky A, Dahlgren RA, Tate KW, Hopmans JW and O’Geen AT (2011) Catchment-Scale Soil Water Dynamics in a Mediterranean-Type Oak Woodland. Vadose Zone Journal 10, 800-15. http://vzj.geoscienceworld.org/cgi/content/abstract/10/3/800

Bonito GM, Gryganskyi AP, Trappe JM and Vilgalys R (2010) A global meta-analysis of Tuber ITS rDNA sequences: species diversity, host associations and long-distance dispersal. Molecular Ecology 19, 4994-5008. http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1365-294X.2010.04855.x

Crookston NL, Rehfeldt GE, Dixon GE and Weiskittel AR (2010) Addressing climate change in the forest vegetation simulator to assess impacts on landscape forest dynamics. Forest Ecology and Management 260, 1198-211. http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0378112710003853

Hynes M, Smith M, Zasoski R and Bledsoe C (2010) A molecular survey of ectomycorrhizal hyphae in a California Quercus-Pinus woodland. Mycorrhiza 20, 265-74.

Rodriguez-Trejo DA and Myers RL (2010) Using Oak Characteristics to Guide Fire Regime Restoration in Mexican Pine-Oak and Oak Forests. Ecological Rest. 28, 304-23. http://er.uwpress.org/cgi/content/abstract/28/3/304

Allen MF (2009) Bidirectional water flows through the soil–fungal–plant mycorrhizal continuum. New Phytologist 182, 290-3. http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1469-8137.2009.02815.x

Austin AT (2009) Planning for connections in the long-term in Patagonia. New Phytologist 182, 299-302. http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1469-8137.2009.02816.x

Chow AT, Lee S-T, O’Geen AT, Orozco T, Beaudette D, Wong P-K, Hernes PJ, Tate KW and Dahlgren RA (2009) Litter Contributions to Dissolved Organic Matter and Disinfection Byproduct Precursors in California Oak Woodland Watersheds. Journal of environmental quality. 38, 2334-43. http://dx.doi.org/10.2134/jeq2008.0394

López-Juez E (2009) Steering the solar panel: plastids influence development. New Phytologist 182, 287-90. http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1469-8137.2009.02808.x

Smith ME, Douhan GW, Fremier AK and Rizzo DM (2009) Are true multihost fungi the exception or the rule? Dominant ectomycorrhizal fungi on Pinus sabiniana differ from those on co-occurring Quercus species. New Phytologist 182, 295-9. http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1469-8137.2009.02801.x

Syphard AD and Franklin J (2009) Differences in spatial predictions among species distribution modeling methods vary with species traits and environmental predictors. Ecography 32, 907-18. http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1600-0587.2009.05883.x

Wilson P (2009) Striking example of avatars evolving together among local communities. New Phytologist 182, 293-5. http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1469-8137.2009.02814.x

Adams JM, Green WA and Zhang Y (2008) Leaf margins and temperature in the North American flora: Recalibrating the paleoclimatic thermometer. Global and Planetary Change 60, 523-34. http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0921818107001166

Dodd RS, Hüberli D, Mayer W, Harnik TY, Afzal-Rafii Z and Garbelotto M (2008) Evidence for the role of synchronicity between host phenology and pathogen activity in the distribution of sudden oak death canker disease. New Phytologist 179, 505-14. http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1469-8137.2008.02450.x

Guglielmo F, Gonthier P, Garbelotto M and Nicolotti G (2008) A PCR-based method for the identification of important wood rotting fungal taxa within Ganoderma, Inonotus s.l. and Phellinus s.l. FEMS Microbiology Letters 282, 228-37. http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1574-6968.2008.01132.x

Morris MH, Smith ME, Rizzo DM, RejmÁnek M and Bledsoe CS (2008) Contrasting ectomycorrhizal fungal communities on the roots of co-occurring oaks (Quercus spp.) in a California woodland. New phytologist. 178, 167-76. http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1469-8137.2007.02348.x

Morris MH, Smith ME, Rizzo DM, Rejmanek M and Bledsoe CS (2008) Contrasting ectomycorrhizal fungal communities on the roots of co-occurring oaks (Quercus spp.) in a California woodland. New Phytol 178, 167-76.

Morris MH, Smith ME, Rizzo DM, Rejmánek M and Bledsoe CS (2008) Contrasting ectomycorrhizal fungal communities on the roots of co-occurring oaks (Quercus spp.) in a California woodland. New Phytologist 178, 167-76. http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1469-8137.2007.02348.x

Ripple WJ and Beschta RL (2008) Trophic cascades involving cougar, mule deer, and black oaks in Yosemite National Park. Biological Conservation 141, 1249-56. http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0006320708000852

Baldocchi DD and Xu L (2007) What limits evaporation from Mediterranean oak woodlands – The supply of moisture in the soil, physiological control by plants or the demand by the atmosphere? Advances in Water Resources 30, 2113-22. http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0309170807000577

Guglielmo F, Bergemann SE, Gonthier P, Nicolotti G and Garbelotto M (2007) A multiplex PCR-based method for the detection and early identification of wood rotting fungi in standing trees. Journal of Applied Microbiology 103, 1490-507. http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1365-2672.2007.03378.x

Smith ME, Douhan GW and Rizzo DM (2007) Ectomycorrhizal community structure in a xeric Quercus woodland based on rDNA sequence analysis of sporocarps and pooled roots. New Phytologist 174, 847-63. http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1469-8137.2007.02040.x

Grivet D, Deguilloux M-F, Petit RJ and Sork VL (2006) Contrasting patterns of historical colonization in white oaks (Quercus spp.) in California and Europe. Molecular Ecology 15, 4085-93. http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1365-294X.2006.03083.x

Lewis DJ, Singer MJ, Dahlgren RA and Tate KW (2006) Nitrate and Sediment Fluxes from a California Rangeland Watershed. Journal of environmental quality. 35, 2202-11. http://dx.doi.org/10.2134/jeq2006.0042

Smith ME, Trappe JM and Rizzo DM (2006) Genea, Genabea and Gilkeya gen. nov.: ascomata and ectomycorrhiza formation in a Quercus woodland. Mycologia. 98, 699-716. http://www.mycologia.org/

Anonymous (2005) Appendix - Common and scientific names for plants, vertebrates, and selected invertebrates. In ‘Rivers of North America’. (Ed.^(Eds Arthur CB and Colbert EC) pp. 1105-34. (Academic Press: Burlington). http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/B9780120882533500286

Anonymous (2005) Oak Trees. In ‘Van Nostrand’s Scientific Encyclopedia’. (Ed.^(Eds  pp. (John Wiley & Sons, Inc.). http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/0471743984.vse5183

Dodd RS, Hüberli D, Douhovnikoff V, Harnik TY, Afzal-Rafii Z and Garbelotto M (2005) Is variation in susceptibility to Phytophthora ramorum correlated with population genetic structure in coast live oak (Quercus agrifolia)? New Phytologist 165, 203-14. http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1469-8137.2004.01200.x

Dodd RS and Afzal-Rafii Z (2004) Selection and dispersal in a multispecies oak hybrid zone. Evolution 58, 261-9.

Dodd RS and Kashani N (2003) Molecular differentiation and diversity among the California red oaks (Fagaceae; Quercus section Lobatae). Theor Appl Genet 107, 884-92.

Kelly NM and Tuxen K (2003) WebGIS for Monitoring “Sudden Oak Death” in coastal California. Computers, Environment and Urban Systems 27, 527-47. http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0198971502000650

George MR, Larsen RE, McDougald NK, Tate KW, Gerlach JD, Jr. and Fulgham KO (2002) Influence of grazing on channel morphology of intermittent streams. Journal of range management. 55, 551-7. http://uvalde.tamu.edu/jrm/jrmhome.htm

Brooks CN and Merenlender AM (2001) Determining the Pattern of Oak Woodland Regeneration for a Cleared Watershed in Northwest California: A Necessary First Step for Restoration. Restoration Ecology 9, 1-12. http://dx.doi.org/10.1046/j.1526-100x.2001.009001001.x

Matzner SL, Rice KJ and Richards JH (2001) Intra-specific variation in xylem cavitation in interior live oak (Quercus wislizenii A. DC.). Journal of experimental botany. 52, 783-9.

Gadau J, Brady SG and Ward PS (1999) Systematics, distribution, and ecology of an endemic California Camponotus quercicola (Hymenoptera:Formicidae). Annals of the Entomological Society of America. 92, 514-22.

Peinado M, Aguirre JL and Delgadillo J (1997) Phytosociological, bioclimatic and biogeographical classification of woody climax communities of western North America. Journal of Vegetation Science 8, 505-28. http://dx.doi.org/10.2307/3237202

Haggerty PK (1994) Damage and recovery in southern Sierra Nevada foothill oak woodland after a severe ground fire. Madroño. 41, 185-98.

Hamilton RW (1994) New life cycle data for two western North American weevils (Coleoptera: Rhynchitidae), with a summary of North American rhynchitid biology. Coleopterists’ bulletin. 48, 331-43.

White SD and Sawyer JO, Jr. (1994) Dynamics of Quercus wislizenii forest and shrubland in the San Bernardino Mountains, California. Madroño. 41, 302-15.

Dodd RS, Rafii ZA and Bojovic S (1993) Chemosystematic study of hybridization in Californian live oak: acorn steroids. Biochemical systematics and ecology. 21, 467-73.

Dodd RS, Rafii ZA and Zavarin E (1993) Chemosystematic variation in acorn fatty acids of Californian live oaks (Quercus agrifolia and Q. wislizenii). Biochemical systematics and ecology. 21, 279-95.

Nason JD, Ellstrand NC and Arnold ML (1992) Patterns of hybridization and introgression in populations of oaks, manzanitas, and irises. American journal of botany. 79, 101-11.

Frost WE and Edinger SB (1991) Effects of tree canopies on soil characteristics of annual rangeland. Journal of range management. 44, 286-8.

Ratliff RD, Duncan DA and Westfall SE (1991) California oak-woodland overstory species affect herbage understory: management implications. Journal of range management. 44, 306-10.

Frost WE and McDougald NK (1989) Tree canopy effects on herbaceous production of annual rangeland during drought. Journal of range management. 42, 281-3.

Hickman GW, Caprile J and Perry E (1989) Oak tree hazard evaluation. Journal of arboriculture. 15, 177-84.

Standiford RB and Howitt RE (1988) Oak stand growth on California’s hardwood rangelands. California agriculture - California Agricultural Experiment Station. 42, 23-4.

Larew HG (1987) Two cynipid wasp acorn galls preserved in the La Brea Tar Pits (early holocene). Proceedings of the Entomological Society of Washington. 89, 831-3.

Lytle DJ and Finch SJ (1987) Relating cordwood production to soil series. USDA Forest Service general technical report PSW - United States, Pacific Southwest Forest and Range Experiment Station. 100, 100.

Irvine JL (1982) Native oaks and urban sprawl. Pacific horticulture. 43, 13-7.

A.H R (1932) Botanical survey of San Joaquin County in central California. Journal of Allergy 3, 375-88. http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0021870732902342

Anonymous (1914) INTERNATIONAL PHYTOGEOGRAPHIC EXCURSION (I.P.E.) IN AMERICA, 1913. New Phytologist 13, 268-75. http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1469-8137.1914.tb05756.x

Benucci GMN, Raggi L, Albertini E, Grebenc T, Bencivenga M, Falcinelli M and Di Massimo G Ectomycorrhizal communities in a productive Tuber aestivum Vittad. orchard: composition, host influence and species replacement. FEMS Microbiology Ecology 76, 170-84. http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1574-6941.2010.01039.x

Bonito GM, Gryganskyi AP, Trappe JM and Vilgalys R A global meta-analysis of Tuber ITS rDNA sequences: species diversity, host associations and long-distance dispersal. Molecular Ecology 19, 4994-5008. http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1365-294X.2010.04855.x

Cheng D, Vigil K, Schanes P, Brown RN and Zhong J Prevalence and burden of two rickettsial phylotypes (G021 and G022) in Ixodes pacificus from California by real-time quantitative PCR. Ticks and Tick-borne Diseases. http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1877959X1300023X

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Grateful acknowledgment is made to the following: for plant names: Australian Plant Name Index, Australian National Herbarium http://www.anbg.gov.au/cpbr/databases/apni-search-full.html; ; The International Plant Names Index, Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew/Harvard University Herbaria/Australian National Herbarium http://www.ipni.org/index.html; Plants Database, United States Department of Agriculture, National Resources Conservation Service http://plants.usda.gov/;DJ Mabberley (1997) The Plant Book, Cambridge University Press (Second Edition); JH Wiersma and B Leon (1999) World Economic Plants, CRC Press; RJ Hnatiuk (1990) Census of Australian Vascular Plants, Australian Government Publishing Service; for information: Science Direct http://www.sciencedirect.com/; Wiley Online Library http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/advanced/search; High Wire http://highwire.stanford.edu/cgi/search; Oxford Journals http://services.oxfordjournals.org/search.dtl; USDA National Agricultural Library http://agricola.nal.usda.gov/booleancube/booleancube_search_cit.html; for synonyms: The Plant List http://www.theplantlist.org/; for common names: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page; etc.


All information is included in good faith but this website does not warrant or guarantee the accuracy of any information on these pages, nor does the website accept responsibility for any loss arising from the use of this information.  Views and opinions are those of the authors themselves.  Every effort has been made to respect copyright owners' rights. 


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